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Full text of "Virginia Beach sun"



lf#Myginia 








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Is Beach Music Under Avalanche Of 'Snow'? 



_ 



By Mike Gooding 
Sun Staff WritCT 

Hie inuige of the enteTtaininent industry in 
Virginia Beach will suffer no damage because of 
the recent arrest of Beach musidan WIBiaiii F. 
Deal of BUI Deal and tiic Bhoadeb oo drug- 
related chvges, leaders in the field say. 

"I don't see that his arrest will have any impact 
CO the entertaiunent busiiwss," said Mkhacl 
ChrMaa. proprietor of Mtcfeacl 
Square Shopping Ceitter. "Ihe only 
might reflect on is Bill Deal with a iHoblem 

Deal was arrested last week in Richifiond on a 
charge of possessing cocaine with intent to 
distribute. Ihree other persons were arrested 
with Deal, including a Virginia Beach public 
schoolteacher. The four were arrested as police 
seized $8,280 in cash and about three and one-half 
ounces of the drug. Deal, released under a $6,100 
bond, was unavailiU>le for comment despite 
repeated efforts to reach him at his home. If 
convicted. Deal would fiace from five to 40 years 
incarceration and up to $23,000 in fines. 

"I don't think Dpal's arrest has any effect on 
the rest (rf us," .said BUfy Dntluit, president of 
Virginia Beaen's "WhUper Coacerta. "The arrest 
reflects on the individual. We don't do drugs. If 
other people do, they're the ones who get caught. 

"I don't see drugs as being widespread in 
Virginia Beach," Douthat continued. "Drugs are 
no wone here than anywhere else. We assume 
some people are into it, but it is just like booze or 
anything else. Some individuals simply can't 
handle it." 




r SaiU MICnaCI /»»cuuc, »ays v«A4Uu« ta»i wvuvi uiuga WW Tvij 

•s in the Hilltop ^^"-a^BAble in Virginia Beach. "I think the dru| 
3nly thing thtt ity^ problem is pretty prevclent here," she said. "If « 
I a intiblein " y^ musician came in from out of town, I would no 



Nucy Faatooc, general manager of the Jewish 
Mother, a restaurant and nightdub on Padfic 
Avenue, says cooune and other drugs are very 
ble in Virginia Beach. "I think the drug 

ra* 

not 

think it would be too difficult for him to get 
drugs." Fantone said marijuana and cocaine are 
the drugs most available in Virginia Be^h, 
adding. "I don't know anyone who does heroin, 
though. 

"Hie Jewish Mother completely discourages 
drug use1}yits entertainers." Fantone continued. 
"We have had some problems in the past. If any 
drugs were ever taken on the premises by 
musicians and we found out about it. we wouldn't 
allow them back." 

Christian said Michael's has a similar policy. 
"Everybody who plays here knows my feelings on 
the subject," he said. "One can definitely not get 
any drugs in my establishment. If I ever saw 
anybody in my club doing drugs. I'd call the cops 
immediatdy and they'd go to jail. " 

Virginia Beach police say drug traffic on the* 
local entertainment front is light. "We cannot 
document with any certainty any local band 
members involved in narcotics," said Capt. E. F. 
Buzy, and administrative aide to Chief Charles 



R. WaU. "And as far as locations or nightclubs, 
we have no cases against any of them . ' ' 

Cecil Hooker, fiddle player for the Virginia 
Beach rock group, Sanff, says entertainers have 
been un&iriy pcrtnyed by the media. "It's too 
bad that musicians get sterotyped as being into 
drugs." he said. "To me. it's not worth it fcv a 
musician to get involved in a situation which could 
arrest his career." Hooker added that drug use is 
strictly forbade among members of his band. 

"It's just not worth it," said Douthat. " Ychi can 
get caught and jeopardize your business and your 
4iveli|iood... and for what? Eventually, using 
drugs is going to catch up with you. If ycHi're a 
musician and you're on a 100-day tour, you have 
to be physically fit." 

Douthat. who has promoted such internation- 
ally-known perfonners as The Rolling Stones, said 
musicians turn to drug use as a meaiu of escape. 
"They make millions of dollars and they get to the 
point where nothing matters anymore." he said. 
"Once you get high-rdling'^like some of these 
guys in the business, reality just isn't there 
anymore." 

"People in the entertainment industry ^e 
different from the rest of us." offered Fantone. 
"They have an extremely high energy level. They 
are not in a nine-to-five syndrome. For the most 



part, they are ymng and single. And for them to 
always be at their peak is difficult. 

"Most pec^le kind of think of drugs as going 
right aloig with entertainment." she added. 

"Drugs are not headquartered or centered in 
entertainment," said Christian. "There is a drug 
problem in the United States, and there is one 
here in Virginia Beach, but it's not limited to the 
music industry." 

Deal, 38. founded the band 23 years ago. In the 
late i960's. the group hit the national charts with 
thfee songs, "I've Been Hurt," "May I." and 
"What Kind Of Fool (Do You TTiink I Arti?)". all 
remakes of tunes recorded by soul music groups 
earlier in the decade. The lO-member band's 
brand of song-styling, known as "Beach Music," 
is a cross between soul and rock and roll. The 
Rhondels have maintained popularity on the 
nightclub and college circuit, performing regular- 
ly in Virginia and North Carolina. 

Everyone interviewed about Deal expressed 
surprise over his arrest. 

"The problem with Bill Deal was the scene in 
Richmraid he was invdved in," said Hooker, who 
said he feld Deal is innocent. "It was an isolated 
inddent." 

"1 knew Bill Deal casually, and I can't really say 
whether he does or does not do drugs," said Fan- 
tone. "I am surprised, though. I've never been 
around him when he did drugs. 

"I've known Bill Deal on and off for a while." 
said Christian. "I don't know him that well to say 
whether he uses drugs, and if I did, I probably 

SeeYHEY, Page6 



TT 



Yarby 
iShow At 
Center 

Margaret Yerby. the 
featured artist in the Feb- 
ruary Munidi»l Center 
Art S^unr. is one e^^oaple 
tri^imasr. ffeoox^u^way 
termed l^uis "a moveabte 
feast." Yerby spent a year 
in tlw Cky of light in 1933 
wiiere slw studied at the 
Louve ~ tl» national 
museum of art. Today, 
she paints sceiws of the 
French capital from 
memories. 

'*I didn't actually begin 
to paint until 13 years 
afc^said Yerby. "But 
the eiqMsure to art in 
Paris developed my inte- 
rest and served as tlw 
motivation when I later 
began to paint." 

Yerby is exhibiting 13 
oil and acrylic paindi^s in 
the show sponsored by the 
^^ginia Beach Arts Cen- 
ter. Tl» scene from Paris 
is a rendition (rfthe Mule- 
line Oathedral on the Rue 
Royale. Memories (rf* her 
travels are also evident in 
"Bavarian Village," an an 
acrylic work <tf a riverside 
street in a German .mill 
town limd with timbered 
houses. "Premier Per- 
formance." an oil palm- 
ing, portrays a youthful 
balferina dter her fint 
stage appearance, 
another memory. 

"I used to dance. In the 
painting, I iraated to 
bring out tltt enuitian of 
that first recital. I recalled 

te VIRGINIA. Pate 6 




Is Chief Against The Wall? 

Colleagues Rebuff Press Criticisms 



Present at the gronadbreaklng was the Fort Eostb Honor Guard . 

, Ckound was broken recently for a new $8.5 million 

barracks and dining hall at Fort Story. 

Present at the ceremonies was Rep. G. William 
Whitehurst. R-2nd IXstrict. 

With Whitehurst wctc Maj. Gen. Harold I. Small, 
ctmimanda of the U.S. Transportation Center at Fort 
Eustis, and Col. James C. Blewster, commander of Fort 
story. Attending the groundbreaking was Cd. J.T. 
Sprague Jr.. who retired last summer as commander of 
Fort Story. 

Hull-ibzard Inc. of Syracuse, N.Y., is building the 
barracks complex at a cost <tf $8,479,000. 

The new facility will consist of three barracks 
buildings with attached company administration and 
supply rooms, as well as a dining haU. Each three-story 
barracks will house two companies (tf up to 1 12 sddiers 
eadi. 

Fort Story houses nearly 2,000 military pawMinel, in- 
duding reaves who use the Army facility. 

Architectural firm for the barracks is Shriver and 
Holland Associates, Norfolk. 



Fort 
Story 
Gets 
New 
Barracks 



ByGregGoldfarb 

"Here are commerio frdm some Virginia Beach city 
officials on CMef Oiarles R. Wall, Virginia Beadi 
Pdice Department. 

"I have found Charles Wall to be a very capable and 
competent administrator," said Oty Manager Thomas 
MacMenbeck, the man who hired, and can fire Wall, 
"hi the short time he's been here he has gained the 
confidence of the community and of the persainel 
within his department." 

Yirglola Beach Conunaowealth's Attorney Paul 
Sdortlao, the dty's chief prosecutor and a man with 
whom Wall confers regularly, said: "He's done very 
well. He's terrific. The cooperation between his office 
and us is better than I've ever seen. I'm delighted 
working with him. My people think he's an outstanding 
individual and doing an outstanding job. We're about 
as happy as we can be with him." 

Although not a dty official, Vbglaia Beach Police 
Officer A. F. Zncaro, a three and one half year member 
of the V.B.P.D., notes that Wall has "made a large im- 
pact on police officers as far as increasing D.U.I, 
(driving under the influence) arrests. He can be contac- 
ted when needed, and is fair, objective and very com- 
petent." 

FiguraUvely speaking. Wall is the King of law 
enforcement dficen in Virginia Beach. He came to 
Virginia Beach m Oct., 1981, after serving for three 
years as chief of police in Mwgantown. West Virginia. 
He succeeds former Virginia Beach Police Chief 
William Davis, and has a total of 26 years of law 



enforcement experience. 

Even in light of Wall's accomplishments, a reant 
editorial by Dermis Hartig in the Jan. 9, 1983 issue of 
the ^0£«n, suggests that Wall does not have a Ann 
handle on the wOTkings of his department. (See Sun 
Commentary, Page 2 for more). Ammg other items,' 
Hartig states that "laxness" and "mismanagement" 



'7 don''t expect my 
people ta be perfect. If an 
officer is active he will 
make mistakes. But I will 
back my people unless 
they continue to make the 
same mistakes" - Wall 




Chief Wall 

may be creeping into the upper levels of the Virainia 
Beach PoUce E>epartment. "I don't know the answer," 
he writes regarding his own allegations . 

S«e UNDERMINING, Page 7 



Free Tax Aid For Virginia Beach Senior Citizens 



"Tax Akte" is a free tu counxling service ffx 
Virginia Beach residoits 60 years of age and older. The 
{»t^ram is sponswed by<the Ammcan Association of 
Retired Poions and the National R^ired Teachers 
ifVssodation in coordlnatitMi with the Intonal Revenue 
Sffvice. 

Vohuteer ccmnsdon trained and certified by the In- 
tonal Revaue Sovice will bcavailri}le at the ftrilowing 
kicatioBS in tte Vugiiua Beach arai between Feb. 1 niKl 
>^ril IS, on tlM days aiKl times indicated for each 
lontkm. 

For additional information cm this program please 



caU 444-4414. 

Kem{»ville Library. 832 Kempsville Road. Tuesdays, 
1 to 4 p.m.. Feb. 1 through April 12. ^ 

Great Neck Library, 12SI Bayne Drive. Wednesdays. 
10a.m. to2p.m., Feb. 2 through April 13. 

Bow Creek Re^eation Center, 3427 Clubhouse Road. 
Friday, 1 to 4 p.m., Feb. 4 through April IS. 

Oceanfrcmt Library, 1811 Arctic Avenue, Wed- 
nesdays, 1 to 4 p.m., Feb. 2 through April 13. 

Baynde Prasiq^rian Quirdi, 1400 Ewell Road. 
Thursdays I to4p.ni., F^. through April 14. 



*The New Moon'' At Virginia Beach Little Theatre 




Hm Vi^inia Beadi Littk Tl^atre will jnesent the 
ronuNk opeietia "tin New Moon," by Sigmuml 
Rombeq and Otcu Hammerstein. n, beginnii^ this 
Ive^OKl and running through tte oul of February, 

^0wtines aft FrUta^ and Satuitlaj^, Feb. 4, S, 
1 1, 12, 18, 19, 2S, md 26 at 8:K) p.m.' Sunday matinees 
on Feb. 6. 13, 20, and 20 at 3 p.m. 

The 3S-iMmber MSt features Faye Edwards, Terry 
Owens, Mary Hess. Stan Carpenter, Tom Harris and 
Kynn Kinch. 

the ^ M ikvCD^ bf Ffail IMer, with ostumes by 



Bobby Wea^ nd Ruby Jean \Ma. Musical director 
a Mark Hvdgiia. 

The ahow b cfesoibed as "lavishly ojstumed" aiwi 
set in FreiKh Louisanna in 1791 just prior to the French 
Revohitian. Songs in the play 'mchndtt "Stout-Hearted 
Nfcn," "lover Come Back lb Me," "SolUy As A 
Summer Sunrise," ani "One Kiss." 

Ihe ^^inia BeKh Ijttte Iheatie is lonted on the 
oner <d 2Mi Street ami Barberton EMw. For 
resera^itt oiO ^8^23. For more information call 
«2-S09S. 



More Than 500 A ttend A nnual Chamber Luncheon 



reccM Vkifria BMch 



Mte Qyatt, IfM^avcB 



awwd w^Bcn M the 
Ckmber of Cawncrce 
$Smg mtt, k«B left: tery 
flf Vfafteia; Garioa Hnper, 
Ed Taylor, GooAnu A 
Animen, antral VMcl^ ■ank; 
AMI; Sandra FortiM, 
Iha^l, AbacH 



TeaqMrary Services; Donaa Datkiel, ^mc 
finwchd&eap. 

ABMBg those la attcadaacc at the recent 
OMBbcr of CoouMrce Aaaad LondKoa was 
Seco^ Dtotrict IMted Stote CoHretsBun Rep. 
G. Wntarn WMtekant m. He was Joftaed by Mi 
wMe, Jaric. Gfcetfi^ WhNaln^ wm Qmrnk^t of 
CanaKrcc PresMeat Robert E. Fentress. 

See Story On Page 4 



'— — ' 



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2 Virginia Beach Sun, F^ruw^ 2, 1983 



Sun Commentary 



W^?4 



Editorials 



No Need For Drugs 



Granted, t|re lifestyle assumed by 
professional entertainers is not one to be 
envied. There are long nights on the road 
and unrelenting pressure to make it to the 
top. 

But this is no excuse for involvement 
with drugs. 

In the entertainment business, the track 
record speaks for itself. Janis, Joplin, 
Jimi Hendrix, John Bonham, Keith 
Moon, Elivs Presley, John Belushi. All 
were gifted, talented entertainers; all arc; 
dead today bemuse of drug overdoses. 

Drug abuse is not limited to enter- 
tainers, however,- it touches all aspects of 
society. Because performers are made into 
celebrities, their vices become more well- 
known. But, doctors, lawyers, flremen, 
newspaper reporters—everyone has a 
tough job-and there is no excuse for any 
of them to become involved in drugs. 

In Virginia Beach, the police depar- 
tment says it has no evidence against any 
musicians or nightclubs regarding 
violations of narcotics laws. Are \*liere any 



investigations underway? Police didn't 
comment. ^ 

Similarly, nightclub operators and m- 
tertainment promoters alike concur that 
there is no great proliferation of drugs in 
Virginia Beach. Hollywood-East this is 
not, they say. 

To think thus is, however, unrealistic. 
There is an epidemic of drug abuse 
nationwide; why would there be no 
problem here? 

Of course, we know better. There are 
illegal and dangerous drugs circulating in 
Virginia Beach, and they are available for 
the asking. 

The challenge before us is un- 
mistakable: We've got to do something 
about drug abuse. Our police must con- 
tinually pursue the dealers. Our parents 
have got to get into the act, too, by coun- 
selmg, supervising, and, when necessary, 
reprimanding. Schools and churches must 
also take part. If we're to rid the com- 
munity of drugs, it must be a total com- 
munity effort.— M.M.G. 



Let's Be Fair 



Several weeks ago, the Beacon (Jan. 9, 
page 6) took some cheap shots at Virginia 
Beach Police Chief Charles R. Wall. 

In editor Dennis Hartig's column, he 
cites "a string of curious events" which 
led him to ask the question, "Is this just 
an unfortunate series of unrelated events? 
Or is it evidence that laxness is creeping 
into the management of the police depart- 
ment?" - ■"■ '^•"^■,iu. i„n,.Mr„ir- 

Further, he states: **I don't know the 
answer. But the occurrence of so many 
embarrassments in such a short span of 
time is troubling. And that's reason 
enough for Chief Wall to make sure these 
are not symptoms of mismanagement 
witliin the ranks." 

First off, the editor admits that he is 
evaluating the situation from the outside 
looking in. If he is really "troubled" 
about the issue he is creating it would ser- 
ve him and his publication well to try to 
g^ the inside story. As it stands, all he has 
done is cast doubt on the the Virginia 
Beach Police Department, which in turn 
casts shadows over the entire city and its 
citizens. 

Secondly, his first example of alledged 
possible incompetence contains a major 
error of fact. He writes, "In October, 
police jailed the wrong man for murder 
and didn't correct the mistake for a mon- 
th." The man was charged with attempted 
murder, not liiurder. Officer Dennis Wat- 
son who was shot in the face, never died 
and is in fact back in uniform and back to 
work. 

The second example, concerning that 
fact that in his opinion "... the vice 
unit Wall created soon after his arrival 
unraveled," is based on one interdepar- 
tmental transfer. 

The third example charges that illegal 
alcohol charges were thrown out of court 
because the vi(^ squad failed to bring 



court laboratory examples to prove 
alcohol was being sold the night of a 
Virginia Beach nip joint raid. Of course 
the court must have proof, but what did 
the court think the beverages were? Kool- 
Aid and Prune Juice? 

And fourth, the one which probably 
trigger^ the editor to finally come down 
on Wall, he blames Wall for his depart- 
ment's responding to a phone call frdin % 
someone in the personnel office' 
suggesting the police department prepare 
in event of a work strike by the city's trash 
collectors. 

By blowing up these incidents he may 
have caused some members of the 
Virginia Beach community to begin to 
wonder about the effectiveness of the 
Virginia Beach Police Department. That 
is, of course, if anyone takes that par- 
ticular editorial seriously. 

The editor, or anybody, is entitled 
professionally, morally, and con- 
stitutionally to expr^s his opinion on 
anything or anyone. And may it ever be 
that way. But the editor didn't take the 
time to find out whether maybe these 
events were prompted by people still 
mnging from the removal of former 
Pd|ice Chief William Davis. He doesn't 
concede that even though Wall is 
ultimately responsible for the actions of 
his police department, Wall cannot be 
consulted oh each and every question 
which arises on a day to day basis. That's 
why he has captains, majors, sergeants 
and lieutenants on the payroll. . 

By no means does Wall need The 
Virginia Beach Sun |o defend him. He is 
strong, and a well educatH num. caiwble 
of protecting himself and his dq)artment. 
But he is also a proud gentlonan, one who 
would have to be waist high in fire before 
screaming "ouch!"— G.D.G. 



Again 



And as long as we're talking about the 
newspaper based in Norfolk and the 
Virginia Biach Police Department, how 
about that story that came out Monday 
morning, Jan. 31, on the local section 
front? 

Critical of the V.B.P.D., the banner 
headline screams "Police slow down in 
response to false alarms." Lower headline 
reads, "Security con\panies criticia new 
policy in Virginia Beach." 



First off, the story, based on when the 
policy was enacted, is four months old. 
Secondly, a more accurate headline would 
call attention to the fact that over 99 pct- 
cent of the burglar alarms the department 
answers are false calls. And third, it is just 
another example of how The Virginian- 
Pilot, bas«l in Norfolk, loves to paint 
Virginia Beach with gloomy shades of 
«uiary.— G.D.G. 



.^ 



r— ^ 



On The SUNny Side ByG«fCoidf«* 

The Toll Road Blues 



Have you ever been biting your fingernails 
when you reached the tdl booth on the 
Expressway? 

Ihe toll booth teller hdds out bet hand for 
either your commuter ticket or your quarter. And 
you, wet fingertips and all, slide the money into 
the outstretched hand. 

ihvc you ever wondered whether or not the 
tellers get sick of having wet appendages stuck 
into their palnu? Maybe that's one reason they 
wear gloves. 

Have you ever pulled up to the tdl booth, 
stretdied out your hand with your money ready 
only to reach a standofT with the teller who is also 
sitting there waiting with her palm up? Well 
somebody is going to have to give in and take the 
inititive to reach a little farther to make the 
transaction. Is it incumbent on the teller or the 
motorist to give the extra few inches? tt is the 
teller because they want the money and because if 
they don't get the money they shouldn't get paid. 

What about when you drive up to the teller and 
she sticks her hand out for the money while 
looking over at her buddy at the next booth. Do 
you ever tease her and move your commuter ticket 
a few inches to the left or right, brushing her 
. fingers with it, so she has to keep gro|ring for it? 

Ever wonder how in the world the toU booth 
tellers do that boring job in the icey cdd of the 
winter or in the blistering heat of the summer? 
Either they really need a job very badly, like the 
job very much, or ate too many Filberts at lunch. 

Do the tdl booth tellers have to say "thank 
you" or do they just do it because they're nice 
people. Expressing their appreciation for your 2S 



cents is probably not part of their job description, 
and even if it was who would monitor the 
frequeTCy (tf the exclamation. It seems they go 
through phases, sometimes saying "thank you" 
other tinws looidng through Uke with a cdd stare 
that could stall your engine. 

QmiM robotics allow for foster tdl booth 
exdianges with motorists? During rush hour, 
traffic coming inU) >%ginia Beach is stretched 
what looks Uke miles to the west. In the mornings 
th^ line leads to the east. Would it not be quicker 
just to stick your ticket into a machine and pull off, 
nd even waiting for a "thank you." Or to stick 
your currency into a machine that can read the 
denomination and give you exact change within 
seconds? ft's just a dream, but it would save the 
sute tons of money m payrdl. 

What about the 10 cents toUs? What a pain in 
the butt, ft's like, sure, they don't aheady make 
enough money on the 2S cents tdl. Ncvfdk 
doesn't charge its motorists to use the on and off 
ramps. Why here? And now we've gd Big 
Brother watching at the Independence and 
Rosemont exist ramps. Kinda eerie isn't it? 

It if true that the Expressway allows for faster 
acMss to many sections of >%ginia Beach and to 
Norfdk. And it's also true that there's probably 
nd a person who wouM want to be stuck with 
Wginia Beadi Boulevard as the main east/west 
mdor route. And what would Vu-ginia Beach's 
tourist industry be without the Expressway leading 
millions of doUars to the oceanfront annually? 

So the next time you're biting your fingernails 
and approaching the tdl booth, think twice. 



Delegate McClanan Reports 



Bus Bill To Protect Children 



The General Assembly of Virginia has already 
had ipany controversial legislations make, the 
headlines here in Richmond. One of the major 
issues being coisidered is the bill to raise the 
legal drinking age to 21. 

The bill has already passed through the 
committee on general laws and is in the process of 
being voted on in the house. There is an 
amendment to the bill which provides, that all 
people that reach the age of 18 before July 1, 
1983, will be eligible for on-pemise consumption, 
and 19 years old by July 1, 1983, for the off- 
premises consumption of beer. 



flottiMatiQa 

The bill to ban flouridation in drinking water 
was a very heated issue. There were many 
arguments, that adding flouride to drinkmg vmier 
is the safest and the most effective way to fight 
cavities. There were also many supporters of the 
bill that stated that flouride is a health hazard and 
may cause can<xr. However, the Senate Educa- 
tion and (fealth Committee voted unanimously to 
junk the bill to ban flouridation of drinking water 
in Virginia^, 



Reddcss DriviBf 

A very important bill that I am sponsoring 
relates to specific instances of recktess driving, ft 
provides, when illegally passing a stopped 
schod bus, the rebuttable presumption that the 
owner of the vehicle illegally passing the schod 
bus was the operator at the time of the violation. 
The bill is very imp(ntant to the safety of our 
children. 



Virginia Beach 
General Assembly 
Delegate Glenn B. 
McClanan, (D) 




McOanan 



ABCPraflts 



I am also sponsoring legislation relating to the 
distribution of ABC prc^ts. It provides for the 
distribution cX ABC prints on the basis of the 
localities population. The population would be 
based aorording to the Is^st estimate of the 
Tayloe Murphy Institute of the University of 
Virpnia. It is a bill that would be very beneficial 
to our growing Qty cX Vu^inia Beach. 

The General Assembly will be in session for 46 
daj^ with adjourment likely to come on Saturday, 
Feb. 26, 1983. Durinf Uiat period, Virginia Beach 
citizens are warmly encouraged to advise me of 
your ofnnicos mt to matters before us. I lode 
ftvward to having you write me as fdlows: 

Dcletate Gkn B. McOanaa, 510 General 
AswaMjr Bddiag, 91f Qqiitd Street, Rich- 
BMBd, Vbgtaia 23219. 

My phom number in Richmond is 786-7103. 



What's On Your Mind? Let Us Know! 

Tlw Virginia Betxk Sun welcomes ai^ «^>unges kXUn to the ediU>r on any and all Virginia Beach 
issues, as well as any other issues, quMtions or coiuxms affecting the well bong of the Virginia Beach 
community. Letters should be typed, double spaced and indwte tlM writers name, address and telephone 
number. Mail letto^ to The Virginia Beach Sun, 138 S. Rosemont Road, Virginia Beach. Va. 234S2. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

138 Soath Roscnoiit Rtiad, Virgiiiii Wtmk, Va. 23452 Fkoiie (804) 486-3430 
USPS-660-140; PaMighcd Wednesdays 

HaMsByeriy GreiGoMteb 

TfMakm Editor 

Within ridewataAKS 

OneYear-S9 

AUOthaArcM 

CHieYear-Sll 

Two Yean- $17 

Se&mA Oass Pcntage is paid M Lyuhaven Suti<m, 

Virgil Bea^ Vh^ote 

7%f KIrvMa 0MC* &M li a MMitar or The Vl^||i*i ■cadi Chaakcr of CouMi«^ 



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Virginia Beach Sun, February 2, 1983 3 



Virginia Beach Happenings This Week 



v^fednesdety 



Amputee Clinic Is Scheduled 

An amputee clinic will meet on today, Wednesday, 
Feb. 2, at 1 p.m. in the physioU therapy gym of Virginia 
Beach Goierai Hospital. 

The clinic is open to any amputee patient, their 
families, and tho^apists. The patient must have a 
referral from their physician aiul must register as an 
outpatient for the initial visit. 

A clinic charge of $12 and the physician's charge are 
generally paid by medical insurance or Medicare. 

For additional information, call 481-8152. 



Family Film Series Is Slated 

A flhn series featuring Dr. James C. Dobson, one of 
the nation's leading psychologists and an expert in 
family counseling, will be shown at Grace Brethren 
Church in Virginia Beach every Wednesday night 
beginning tonight through March 16 at 7:30 p.m. 

Entitled "Focus on the Family," the series has been 
viewed by over 4 million individuals since its release two 
years ago, and over 13,000 churches have presented the 
seven-part series. 

The church is looited at 803 First Colonial Road. 




Miss Princess Anne 



PaiUd|iatiag in Satarday's 23rd Aannal Mtat PHkcm Aaae n«H»l will fcatare, back row from Icri: Lora Mallhcw*. dangklcf of Mr. aid 
Mrs. Dalia« Mattbcwt; Terri Andmoa, daagklcr of Pnia Milk Aadcfion; Paula PiilUng, daughter of Mr. and Mr*. William PnlUng; EHnbclii 
Copciaad, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. K. Racford Copchad, Jr.; KcHic Parsons, daughter of Mr. and Mn. WiUiam H. Parsons; and Rcmc 
Fiitr, daaghlcr of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Flier. Front Row: Deborah Mcrrit, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Mcrrilt; Ginger Bowen, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Graham; Grace Jaduoa, danghlcr of Mr. ud Mrs. Edward Rosario; and Cynthia Setnik, daughter of Mr. aad Mrs. 
John Setnik. Not pictwcd nrcf Grclchen SeUen, danghter of Mr. and Mrs. DonnM Sellers; and Cheryl Stewart, daughter of Mr. aad Mrs. 
Ronald Stewart. . 



Mond ay 



Inde. Junior Band Parents Meet 

A covered dish dinner will be held as part of the In- 
dependence Junior High School Band Parents monthly 
meeting. The dinner is to be held in the school cafeteria 
on Monday, Feb. 7, at 6:30. ^ 

All family members are encouraged to attend. 

Call 340-5313 for more information. 



TCC Offers New Sewing Class 

The Virginia Beach Campus of Tidewater Com- 
munity College in cooperation with the Virginia Beach" 
Cooperative Extension Service is now offering eight- 
week classes in beginning and intermediate sewing at the 
extension annex on Birdneck Road. 

Intermediate sewing will take place on Mondays from 
7 to 10 p.m. and is designed for men and women uitli 
some sewing experience. Beginning sewing will meet on 
Tuesdays from 9 a.m. to noon or from 7 to 10 p.m. 

The fee for each course is $3. Participants must fur 
nish their own machines. For more information, call the 
extension service at 427-4511. TO register, contact the 
Continuing Education Office at TCC's Virginia Beach 
Campus, 427-3070, ext. 113. 



Thursda y - Frida y 

Ballet Company Auditions Set Skip Castro Band To Perform 



The Performing Arts Unit of the Virginia Beach 

Department of Parks and Recreation announces the 

auditions for a March performance by the All-Cities 

JBallet Company on Feb. 3 and 4 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

in the studio at the Old Donation School for the Gifted. 

The All-Cities Ballet Company choreographer is the 
renowned Pilar Tapia, who has been delighting Tide- 
water since 1977 with her versions of "Peter and the 
Wolf," "Peter Pan," "The Red Shoes," "A. Mid- 
summer Night's Dream" and much more. She is 
looking for both males and females, ages 12 andover. 

For further information, please contact the Perfor- 
ming Arts Unit at 493-1892.' 



Perceptor Alpha Xi To Meet 

Preceptor Alpha Xi of Beta Sigma Phi will meet on 
Thursday, Feb. 3, at the home of Teresa Barnes, 500 
Plantation Drive, at 7:30 p.m. 

Following the business meeting, Teresa will present 
the cultural program entitled "The Eyes Have It." 

Rcpresentaitves for the meeting of the Tidewater City 
Council of Beta Sigma Phi which will be held Thursday, 
Feb. 10, at St. Peters Episcopal Church, are Diana Pet- 
tit and Judy Holland. 



The Skip Castro Band, natives of Charlottesville, 
Va., will bring their special brand of rock and roll to thf 
resort city this Friday, Feb. 4, at 9 p.m. at the Beach 
Theater on Atlantic Avenue. For further information 
call 425-1975. 



Saturday 



Puppet Show Set For Kempsville 

The Parks and Recreation Puppets, sponsored by the 
Performing Arts Unit of the Virginia Beach Department 
of Parks and Recreation, will present a show, "The 
Magic Onion," by the popular Wappadoodle Puppet 
Company on Saturday, Feb. 5, at 11 a.m. in the 
Virginia Beach Recreation Center-Kempsville Theatre 
and on Saturday, Feb. 12, at 11 a.m. at the Virginia 
Beach Recreation Center- Bow Creek. 

The delightful children's fantasy is the creation of 
Alma Beisel and Susan Sussman. 

The shows are free and open to the public. For further 
information, p^ease call 495-1892. 



Horse Judging Workshop Slated 

The Virginia Beach 4-H Office is offering a 4-H Horse 
Judging Workshop on Saturday, Feb. 5, at Cedar 
Valley Farms, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The workshop will 
include selection and evaluation of horses based upon 
conformation and performance, in addition to breed 
type. 

For more information contact the Virginia Beach 
Agriculture Department. ^_ __ ^ 



Exercise-a-thon On Birdneck Rd. 

An exercise-a-thon to benefit Cystic Fibrosis will be 
held Feb. 5 to 12 at Williams Exercise Studio, 521 Bird- 
neck Road, beginning at 10 a.m. 

Call Linda Williams, 422-1900, for more infor- 
mation. 



rn^i lift 1 If 




unda y 

Autocross at Pembroke 

The Tidewater Sports Car Club has announced "The 
Toboggan Run Autocross," to be held on Sunday, Feb 
6 at Pembroke Mall. Registration is at 9 a.m.; first car 
off at 10:30 a.m. 

A car show will be held inside Pembroke Mall Friday 
and Saturday, Feb. 4 and 5. For more information call 
497-4049. 



Tuesday 



PA Women Meet At Tandom's 

The Princess Anne Woman's Qub of Virginia Beach 
will meet on Tuesday. Feb. 8 at 11 a.m. at Tandom's 
Pine Tree Inn. 

Mrs. G.E. Mott and Mrs. C.A. Miller will present a 
program on Community improvement. 



Dealing With Strokes, Stress 

The Stroke Club will meet int he Physical Therapy 
gym at Virginia Beach General Hospital on Tuesday, 
Feb. 8 at 4 p.m. 

Daniel L. Darby^ Ni.D., psychiatrist, will speak about 
"Emotional Stresses in Dealing with Recovery from 
Stroke." There is no cost to participants. Additional in- 
formation is available by calling 48 1 -8 1 52. 



Xi Alpha Rho Chapter To Meet 

Xi Alpha Rho Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi Sorority 
will meet on Tuesday, Feb. 8 at 7:30 p.m. in the home of 
Cindy Ennis located at 569 Aragona Blvd. 

The program entitled "A Woman's Best Friend" will 
be presented by Karen Schochtert. Final plans for a 
breakfast after the Valentine Dance will be made. 

Call 499-5609 for more information. 





FARM EQUIPMENT 

Richard E. M«rc«r, Jr. 
553 John Etheridge Road 

(ST. IRIDCS section) 

Chesapeake. Va^ 

OK »«*«, tahl BattltUtt.<t ^tud. Snuth, Highway lit, to St. Slidti UiUon 76 
StU-Stlvict Gai StatiCH. Tuin cnto InJian Cietk Hoad dud iottou auction 
tigH» i milti to tatt. ^^^^^^^ 



- 1456 International Diesel Tractor 1 

- 856 International Diesel Tractor 4 

- International HlRhboy Cub Tractor l 

with 60" Rotary Hower i 

- 400 International GAs Ti^actov 2 

- 6 Row Intamational #470 Disc Harrow 

- 6 Row Kelley K.M.C. Disc Sedder 2 

- 4 Row Birch Disc Bedder 1 

- Hardee Hydcaullc Ditchbank Mower 1 

- Rhino #1500 Hydraulic An«le Grader 1 

Blade 1 

- 4 Row Ferguson Tlllervator 

- John Blue Pull-Type Liquid Fertilizer 

Rig with 500 Gal. StalnlcJs Steel 

Tank 1 

- Ferguson Drain Digger 

- Hardee 3 Pt. 200 Gal. Weed Sprayer I 

- Hoods #60 Rotary Hower, 3 Pt. 



ftiiaiacrR's mw 

«rtJT«Ju c s tt « tt <■ » 



H«. M.'ii'i',« It a ii^rm3 



sci-it MOKkiHs conditioH. invnHm^t^^ 

III ccse c,< ti uw and t^ct om day oj auctivr 
9t.dHtidau. Ti biua\i/ 



M day oi au ctiuf 

\amt tZmt . ~>)'p.:Ti 

a»i mo iHing btf^oXf iaTi timt. TtRaS: CAS 
punchattt muit be madt on day os SJ^c 



- 28' Donahue Equlpneat Trailer 

- John Deere 71 Flex Planters 

- 12 • Ferguson Chisel Plow 

- Woods #214 Pull-Type Rotary Mo%»er 

- 100 Gal. Fuel Tanks i Piasp? 

(Fits tn Pickup Truck) 

- 500 Gal . Skid Fuel Tanks & Pumps 
-250 Gal. Fuel Tank 

- Lot of 30' Creosote Poles 

- 8" Camper Top 

- 1969 International 1600 Truck 

with 14' Gregory Duap Grain Bod 
1-1970 International 1800 Tanden 
Axle DuBip Truck 

- 1955 Ford lO-Wheeler with 18' 

Steel Flat (No Dump) 

- Ford 4 - 14" Bottom Plow, Seal- 

Mounted (Never Used) 

p utitl: the Cluiapt^akt Tim Vtpt. 
peiat-L'ii. Thii i()uipmtnt ii in 
VON'T MK^tS THIS SAW . 

"^fr^stT^be httrf tht iottouiins 
jtuJT imptctiun fKA-daij, Ftbtua*<> 4th 
H OR CMlfK. Paumtnt in iuU on all 
iHf f J Jack Ptcptti, Bondtd kaZiontiA.. 



Sat, Fabniaiy 5, 1983 • 10:30 a.wi. 




Library 
SUNIines 



By AMiitut Library DIractor 
iota D.Stewart 



Area Libraries 



Have You Notiped New Name? 

Have you noticed when you telephone a Virginia 
Beach public library that you hear a new name? If not, 
listen carefully wht next time you call. Yai're sure to 
hear someone refer to their library as an "area 
library." 





(904)490-1114 

Arrowhead /^U 

VIrgftUo Bmek, VIrgUua, 23462 



You may be asking, "Why the change?" After all, if "Trirn T-TolrfSi 
"branch library" was good enough for 23 years, why 1 lUiA A AV/iVAO 

the sudden change to "area library?" Probably the 
biggest reason prompting us to make the change was 
the Central Library. 



Dance 



Virginia Beach will soon have a Central Library, a 
facility that will be a powerful force of information for 
residents of Virginia Beach. We are committed to the 
development of this building without stripping the 
"branch libraries" of their ability to meet the book and 
information needs of the residents in their surrounding 
neighborhoods. We cho<»e to rename the branches as 
"area libraries" in order to emphasize or determina- 
tion to deliver accessible library service in facilities 
capable of meeting a substantial number (rf the book 
and information needs of the residents of each city 
study area. 

We also believe that the word "branch" says more 
about the structure of the library than it does about the 
pec^)lc who use the Ubrary. We want to name our 
buildings in a way that indicates our belief that only 
through a relationship between the hbrary and its 
community does it accomplish a valuable purpose. 
"Area library" clearly identifies who the building wUl 
serve. 

Saying and doing are often two different things. 
We're now saying that we have five area libraries, yet it 
will take us some time to completely eliminate the word 
branch from our signs, stationary wid forms. We'll 
make these changes gradually while we use existing 
supplies. The first change you will notice will be m the 
exteriw signs that identify each building. 

The New Year will mcsm many things for residents of 
Virginia Beach as they use their public library. The 
change to "area" libraries is one element in our 
exciting new beginning 



Trim, Inc., will hold a 
dance for heart on Sun- 
day, |eb. 13, from 9 a.m. 
to 1 p.m. at the Haygood 
Skating Center in Virginia 
Beach. 

Men, women, and 
children will participate in 
aeriobic exercises to raise 
money for the American 
Heart Association. The 
event, ^rt of the Heart 
Association's first annual 
dance for heart program, 
is open to all who would 
like to join the fun and 
exercise for a healthier 
heart. 

Call 460-1933 for fur- 
ther information. 



Meeting 
Canceled 

The Feb. 21 meeting of 
Virginia Beach City Coun- 
cil has been cancelled in 
observance of Washing- 
xor's birthday. 



r 



Pavilion Activities 



The Vffginia Beach Pavilion has announced the 
following activities: 

Feb. 3 to 13: Mid- Atlantic Spots and Boat Show. 

Feb. 6 to 8: Evelyn Woods Reading Dynamics. 

Feb. 10: (Dome) Virginia Beach Municipal Em- 
[rfoyees Fe(teral Oedit UnSon Annual Mcc* ng. 

Feb. 13: (Dome) Library Department Benefit Bode 
Sale. 

Feb. 16: Evelyn Woods Leading Dynamics. 



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4 Virginia Beach Sun, February 2, 1983 



y 



Virsinia Belich Sun News 



Student Creative Comer' 



These works are frmn dUrd ^ade students at Malibu 
Elementary School. The principal is John Prine. _ . , 



On Halloween h|ght 

On Halloween night 
The moon shines bright 
The light of the moon makes , 
A tree seem like a hairy baboon. 
A witch eats pie and a ghost is high. 
I am eight years old and my cake can mold. 
October is fun, especially when my mom buys 
sweet buns. 

By Lorianne Thomas, 8, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel 
Thomas. Lorianne is a third grader in Min Barbara Broolcs' 
class. 



My Funny Pet Bowl 

I have a pet. He is a bird. He is white and blue. 
He likes to hang by his feet. He swings by his beak 
too. The funniest thing he does is hang upside 
down on the bars. He also takes a bath in his 
water. Once he broke his leg. But he was lucky 
because there was a lady who raised birds. She 
fixed his leg. Now he is living happily ever after. 

By Rkhard GoMuwr, S. sM of Mr. and Mn. Edward Gocaacr. 
His teacher is Mrs. EJeaor Gore. 



On Christmas Day 

On Christmas Day when snow falls down it will 
run all around. The snow is white, cold and wet. 
The clouds are blue, soft and smooth. While 
children and grownups slMp in their beds Santa 
gets ready for a long ride in the sky. Santa goes 
from house to house to house dtoppiT^ toys down 
the chimney. Oh boy! I can't wait untU Christmas 
comes. By the way, I hope you have a merry 
Christmas too. 

By aady DHdM HIms, 9, dai«hler of Mary HIbm. Her 
teacher b Mrs. EicMr Gore. 



I have lots and loU of friends. Thtfe is Rebecca 
and Catie and Melinda and lots of othm. Rebecca 
and me like to go to parties but sometimes Catie 
and Melinda don'tget to go. 

1^ Becky CUwt S, dandier of Mr. and Mrs. Kdbtrt Om. 
Her teacher is Mrs. QeMT Gore. 



Christmas 



On Christmas I get lots of toys. Last year we 
had a white Christmas. It snowed and snowed. It 
was fun but it was cold. We made a snowman. I 
made a snowman too. His name was Snowy. He 
was not big at all but he was the best snow tnan I 
ever made. 



By Marc Raflucy, 1. soa of Mr. aid Mrs. Maitoa 
teacher is Mrs. Eieaor Gore. 



His 



My Pet 



I have a dog. His name is Beauregard. 
Beauregard is very funny and he likes to play alot 
with my dad. He is very frisky and JJove him alot. 

By Rebecca Crannitt, 8, daagUer of Mr. aid Mn. MMaai 
Swider. Her teacher is Mrs. Deaor Gore. 

Christmas 

On Christmas you get a lot of toys and candy. If 
you eat too much you may get sick. Christmas is 
fun because you always get something you want. 
Christmas is almost here uid I can't wait. 



By Jirfus McLaaiia, S, soa of Mr, 
His teacher is Mn. Elcaoic Gore. 



and IMrs. JaMS McLaaita 



Friends 



Christmsts 



Christmas is fun. Our relatives give us pcwnts 
on Christmas. We have Christmas trees up for 
Christmas. If you cat too many sweets you will get 
sick. 



By MdtaHla Casoa, t, dai^hter of Mr. 
Her teacher Is Mrs. Eieaor Gort. 



aad sars. Joe Casoa. 



Friends are nice. I have two very goorf friends. 
Their names are Chris Barnhart and Chris Ellis. 
We like football and kickball. We sit by each other 
at lunch. 

By Jesse BaUer, S, soa of Mr. aad Mrs. Stevea Bailer. His 
teacher is Mrs. Eieaor Gore. 



If I Were A Turkey 

If I were a turkey I would run away from home. 
Because I would get my head chopped off by my 
master. You would run away too. I'm glad I'm 
not a turkey. 

By Amy Setser, 9, daaghter of Mr. and Mrs. Cart Sctssr. Her 
teacher is Mrs. Eieaor Gore. 



ViiilBla Beach Ei^Hsh 
Virginia Bexk Sun for 

K. Also tacMe the 
B.13iS.Boaessart 
ilsttenM^rhcfore. 



to sabirit coBpieltd enapics of 
thcstadeat'scoavia 
of the stadHst's EhU teacher aad the schod's 
, Vb^ria Bsach, VA, 234S2. For mm taforanttoa caB 4M44M. 



ctaalhe writiai to Tht 



taneVbiMt 
far each WsdMaday's 



Beach Poets Learn Of Poetry Contest 




VbHiria Beach Chaahcr of Ceauame PiesidMt tUibtrt E. Featicss, right, grceU Rep. G. Wlllia« Whiiefearst (R-tad DIstilct) aad his wife, 
Jaaie. Chaasber Execative Director Bill Center is behiad Whitehoni's left shoulder. 

Thinking Big ' Is Fentress' Aim 



About 530 people were 
in attendance for the 
recent Virginia Beach 
Chamber of Commerce 
Annual Membership Lun- 
cheon held at the Pavilion. 

Robert E. Fentress, the 
1,000-member organiz- 
ation's president for 1983, 
said the group "not only 
has the challenge and the 
opportunity, but also the 
moral obligation to 
'Think No Little 
Thoughs'" about the 



city's future. This theme 
wiU be a Chamb^" slogan 
for the coming year. 

In his first formal 
public speech since 
assuming the Chamber's 
presidency on Jan. 1 from 
Robert W. Berry, Jr., 
Fentress, a Bank of 
Virginia vice president, 
noted that growth is "our 
greatest friend," but it 
also represents ''a 
challenging adversary." In 



the coming year, Fentress 
said, the Chambo- must 
"look forward to the 
results we accomplish by 
thinking big." 



Among the Chambers 
goals are: supporting the 
city's plan to tap Lake 
Gaston as a long-term 
water supply, to enhance 
the city's potential as a 
tourist attraction, and to 
update the "Virginia 



Beach Tomorrow" study. 
Guest speaker for the 
event was Dr. Ronald E. 
Carrier, president of 
James Madison University 
in Harrisonburg, Va. In- 
coming executive board 
members were also in- 
stalled at the luncheon. 
They are: Basil R. Adams, 
Jr., Robert H. DeFord, 
Jr., James N. Fletcher, 
William J. Jones, R. Dean 
Lee, Clenton W. Shanks 
and Eugene Walters. 



Virginia Beach high 
school students are invit- 
ed to participate in the 
fifth annual poety coitest 
sponsored by Virginia 
Tech's English depart- 
^_^ent. 

First price is $100; 
second, ISO; and third, 
$23. Four $10 prizes will 
be awarded for fourth 
,^ place, and honorable 
mentions will be made as 
merited. The top three 
prize winners and their 
sponsoring teachers will 
be invited to appear aa 
WDBJ-TV. Roanc^, and 



to Upe a {ffogram at 
WBRA-TV, Roanoke, for 
release to Public Broad- 
casting Service stations 
throughout Virginta. 

Ihe deadline for sub- 
mission is Mvdi 15. Win- 
ners will be notified in 
April. 



Contest rules limit 
poems to one per student, 
with no restrictions on 
length, form, or subject 
matter. Entries should be 
typed and double-spaced 
on 8Vi by 11-inch ptaper, 
or neatly handwritten. 

The author's name, 



age, grade, home 
address, and telephone 
number should appear on 
eadi entry with the tiame 
and address of his or her 
high school. Tbe signa- 
ture of the sponsoring 
English teacher must 
appear below the poem. 
All information, plus the 
poem, should appear on 
one page, if possible, 
without a cover sheet. 
Entries from a schod 



should be sent in one 
envelope to: Poetry Con- 
test, English Departnwnt, 
WiUiams HaU, Virginia 
Tech, Blacksburg, VA 
24061. Entries will not be 
admowledged or return- 
ed. For copies of winning : 
poems and Edge's com- 
ments, include an 8Vi by 
11-inch self-addressed 
envelope with 40 cents 
postage. 



V 



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Virginia Beach Sun, February 2, 1 983 5 



Beach Police Hews 



.,L - 



■^ptwm(^fmi:,t 






Crime Solversi 497-0000 




From left to right are: Captain H. R. Campbell; communicatloiis officer Susan P. Willboite; and com- 
munications supervisors Meiinda BTramley and Lynne Bailey. 




Willhoite Named 
Communications 
Officer Of Year 



Susan P. Whillhoite has been selected as the First 
Communications Officer of the Year for the Virginia 
Beach Police Department. 

Communications Officer Willhoite was chosen from 
nominees submitted to a selection board comprised of 
three Communications Supervisors and three Com- 
munications Officers. 

Criteria for selection included overall record and any 
single act of achievement. Communications Officer 
Willhoite has been employed in the Communications 
Bureau since May, 1976 and was cited for her overall 
professional job performance. In addition, Willhoite 
was commended for her composure and ability to deal 
with emergency situations. She was worlcing the radio 
on March 2, 1979 when Officer R. R. Leggett was 
shot and again on December 27, 1981 when Officer D. 
T. Maloney was shot. She handled both stressful 
situations in an outstanding manner. 

A Certificate of Recognition was recently presented 
to her by Captain H. R. Campbell, Commanding Of- 
ficer of the Communications Bureau. 



Susan WUIhoite 



IN ONE MINOre VOU CAN SAY, 

"KISS THE KIDS FOR ME,TELLTHEM 

FLL BE HOME SOONr 12 TTMEa 




Calling saneone you love 
when you are away means 
gi vir^ scxnething df yourself. 
Swwing that you care. 

It means sharing a mo- 
ment with those vou bve— 
a gift so pere(Miai that 
everycMie at hone can feel 
and share in the wErnnth of 
the oonversatim. 

It costs so little and means 
so much. You can call anytime 
for little more than the price 
of a hamburger and a soft 
drink, even less after 5 pjn. 
and m weekends. 



I Subjects wanted by Crime Solvers 

$1,000 For Info 

As this weelc's "Crime of the Week" Virginia Beach 

Crime Solvers is attempting to locate two men for 

crimes committed in Virginia Beach. Crime solvers will 

pay up to $1,000 in cash to anyone who can provide in- 

[ formatioQ that leads to their apprehension. 

The first wanted person is Lawrence James 
Frederick, a 26 year old white male, 6'0" tall. 185 
pounds, with blonde hair and blue eyes. He has used 
the alias Larry Lawrence. Frederick is wanted in 
connectitm with 5 felonies-passing 3 forged withdrawal 
slips and receiving cash twice from accounts at the Life 
Federal Savings and Loan. 

The sec<M»d wanted perscm is Daniel Monteith 
Howard. Howard is a 20 year old white male, 5 '9" tall, 
weighs 140 pounds with brown hair and green eyes. He 
is wanted by Virginia Beach in connection with a Dec. 
20, 1982 burglary and grand larceny of Apple Orchard 
Ct. and for three felcxiy offenses for fwgery. Howard 
also has a felony warrant outstanding in Norfolk. 

Anyone who has information about these men or any 
other wanted perscm can call Virginia Beach Crime 
Solvers at 427-0000. Crime Solvers will also pay up to 
St, 000 in cash foi^^ information about any crime or 
information leading to the recovery of stolen property 
or the ccMifiscation of drugs. You never have to give 
your name to collect the rewards. 

Burglary Info Sought 

Daring 1982 Virginia Be«6h.citiKens and businesses 
were the victims in over 2,000 burglaries with more 
thari$2 mimdS'ivmfi'c^ptGperxy taken. As this weeks 
^Crftne of the Week" Virginia Beach Crime Solvers is 
offering up to $1,000 cash reward for information about 
a series of burglaries in the Chesapeake Beach area. 

Between August 27,1982 and Jan. 3, 1983, during 
various hours of the day and night, unknown persons 
have cOTimitted 15 burglaries within this section of our 
dty. These burglaries have occureed on 11 different 
streets with the hardest hit street being Lookout Road, 
with four. The most common way used ot get inside has 
been the prying open of doors and windows. The items 
taken, valued at several th(Hisand dollars, included 
jewelry, televisions, stereos, durgs, money, along with 
gine pistols and four rifles. 

Anyone with infcM-maticMi about these or any other 
burglaries can call Crime Solvers at 427-0000 and, if an 
jtrrest is made, cdlect up to a $1,000 cash reward. Cash 
Vk'ill also b)e paid for information about the location of 
«den ptoptity, wanted persons, drugs or for 
ihformaticxi about any crime ccmmitted in Virjginia 
^ach. 

, Crime Servers guarantees you will never have to give 
your name to cdlect the rewards. 



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the shortest distance 
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Taylor 

Monthly Profile 

Rick ^McGruff Taylor 

If you've ever seen the Virginia Beach Police 
Department's "Officer McOuff," a crime pre- 
vemioQ character popularized by television, it was 
probably Master Pdice Officer Richard L Tajrtor 
In the costume. 

A 17 year member of the V.B.P.D., Taylor, who 
was instrumental in securing the outfit two years 
ago, estimates that he dais the costume and 
ventures out into the community at least once a 
month. Visiting shopping malls, kindergartens 
and participating in Ouistmas parades, Taylor 
gladly wears the $500 costume, of which there are 
only three others in existence, he said, but wishes 
there were more opportunities and time for 
' ,McGruff to get out and be seen. 

"We'd like to do more with it," Taylor said, 
noting that McGruffs nberglass head limits 
"But we're trying to put a mike in the head." 

Currently Taylor is assigned to the V.B.P.D.'s 
Crime Prevention Unit where he has served for 
over two years. He has also served in the First 
Precinct, Traffic Bureau. K-9 unit and Juvenile 
Bureau. 

But of all his assignments, he enjoys his current 
job the best. 

"I enjoy them all," he said, "but in crime 
prevention you meet a whole different kind of 
person. Before I was meeting people mostly from 
one section of society. Now I meet pec^le who 
really appreciate us. I feel I can really help 
somebody in the crime prevention end of it." 

While working in the Juvenile Bureau he said 
he enjoyed it, "but I did not enjoy seeing the 
same kids getting into trouble day after day. That 
was Wd news." ' ' 

Taylor's concern fw crime prevention and 
assisting, people from different walks of life 
added to his becoming a police officer after 
serving as a hospital corpsman in the htavy. 

Taylor, a native of Eureka, Dlnois, said his 
father had been a deputy sheriff and a pdice 
officer. With this background, it seemed natural 
for him to try police work. 

"After being a hospital corpsman, I decided to 
give pdice work a try." Taylor said, "and I really 
enjoyed it. Hiere was something different 
happening every day. It was the same dd routine 
in the Navy." 

Taylor is married to his wife Terry. They have 
six children and live in the Princess Anne section 
of the dty. Taylor's civic affiliations include the 
Tidewater Peninsula/Police Qime Prevention 
Association; the Wginia Grime Prevention Asso- 
ciation; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Virginia 
Army/ Air National Guard; a board member of the 
Explorer ScouU, Post 91 1 ; and serves as secretary 
of the Fraternal Order (rf Pdice. 



Virginia Beach Precinct By Precinct Reports 



The fdlowing are some of the criminal activities 
repwted over the weekend in each of the city's 
thfiee pdice precincts. 

First Precinct, covering 
Biackwater, Pango, Princess Anne 

and KempsviUe Boroughs. 
Capt. M.E. Bcane in Command. 

A robbery took place at 880 S. Military Iflghway 
at iheJleMc04le|iartment store, acc(xding to Lt. 
Ld. ^Suttt^^ "rte crime was perpetrated on 
Supday, Jan., 30 at 2 p.m. Pdice are looking for a 
wt^j^e. I foot 9, thin build, with light brown 
iiair. He"n#as bearing sunglasses, and possibly a 
red plaid shirt. A handgun was used. The susjJect 
gOC away with^ total of $5. 

Also in |1» f\nt Precinct, the Virginia Beach 
Vice Squad Friday made two arrests at The Upper 
Room in the Hodand Lakes Shipping Center. 

Acting with a search warrant, officers arrested 
Michael Brian MiskilJ of Dunbrook Court for 
possession of Marijuana, and Jdin William 
Brewster of Mogul Bear Court f(» possessiai of 
drug paraphcnalia with intent to distribute. 
Brewster If the owner of The Upper Room. 

Both fldcn were chsffged with Qass One 
MisdemeancffS. 

. .ScmiMlPRciB<A, covertag 
caMenhkatforU^ahavea, and 

%1rgMa Beach Borougllh, 
Gipt. W.W.Baker in comnuMt 

"It was a fWrly quiet week," said Lt. K. A. 

Belangia. "There is really nothing that I know d 

any maipr signi^cance |o report. Everything went 

P|^|^ie|^|Vid that's just the way I Uke it. 

We *wer6 lodbrig real good." 

Third Prednct, ctn^ftag 
teysMc ai^ western half 



ori^rBBhaTen Bara^h 
OMrt. A.E. South tai comauad. 

< 

Lt. H.J. Coefield reported the following crimes: 

•Conmercial burgIaries--4M)0 block of FotoiBac 
Ave., 4700 block of VbiMa Beach Bonlcvaid. 

•Residential burglaries-700 block of Lake 
Edward Drhre, 600 bkxk of Delaara lane, 4600 
block of Crown Pdat laoc. 

Coefield said a strongarm rdibery took place at 
B^ Piae Dr. Police are looking for a white male, 
18-20 years dd, 145 pounds, with blond curly hair 
and front tooth missing. The suspect is believed to 
frequent businesses at SSth Stoeet and Little Neck 
Road. ^ 

Also, Coefield said, pdice apprehended a 24 
year-dd man they had been seeking for several 
sexual dfenses which took place in the PeBbraiK 
lakes apartiMaU. 

Ualfana DhrtiioB Sai^ort Boreaa, ladi^H 

SWAToperatkiM, dvi dif tarhaacci, K-9 corps, 

hcHcoirtcraad aariae patrol, crtaac preveatfoa 

Mi aaalysls. Capt. T.V. hytag ia raauwuid. 

"Everythii^ w»t snomh with no incidents of 
any serious consequence," said Lt. W.D. Hay- 
den. K-9 uniu were used to track a man wanted 
on nine separate misdenieanor charges on 
Sunday, Jan. M. At ^^>raRiiMtely 2 p.m.. Officer 
S.C. Smith apprehended the man hiding in woods 
behind Woodhary Forrcit appartwati off laaUa 
Road, K«ording to Hayden. 

Also, canines. w«|e u^ to aw>rebend two 
esci^xes £ran fiuMn Sme oMntal fiusUity near 
WilUamsburg, acxording to ^t. S. KeUer. The 
dogs tracted the suspccu through woods near 
Gtarla Dr., but bist the seem. Later, however. 
Officer M. Kennedy spotted tlK suspccu at 
approximately 9:40 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 31, and 
they were apprehended and taken to tlw Seomd 
Precinct. 



J 



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I 

6 Virginik Ba^ Sun. February 2, 1983 



Entertainment/Sports 



Planetarium 
presentations 
Are Planned 

1 The Virgiinia Beach City 
l*ublic Schools 

l^lanetarium has announ- 
fed that its public 
erogram for February will 
be "Starbound." 
I This lavish production 
is an overview of man's 
progress in learning about 
jpie heavens. It begins with 
|n exciting photo montage 
^f current accomplish- 
pients in space. Next, 
(here is a review of some 
pf the bright con- 
stellations through the 
ieasons. This leads to a 
chronological unfolding 
pf the tools man used to 
teach his present state of 
knowledge of the univer- 
se, and some examples of 
those exciting - and some- 
. times bewildering 
discoveries. Galaxies, 
pulsars, black hole stars, 
and the mysterious 
quasars are examined. 

Planetarium hours are: 
Sundays, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., 
Feb.6, 13,20, and 27; and 
Tuesdays, 7 p.m. to 8 
p.m.,Feb. 8, IS, and22. 

The planetarium seats 
120 people and is easily 
accessible from the Route 
44 toll road by taking the 
Lynnhaven Exit (exit 3) to 
the Lynnhaven Parkway 
and turning right at the 
first street - Smith Lynn- 
haven Road - to Plaza 
junior High Schod where 
the plaiietarium is located. 




In Virginia Beach 



Six Yeiars Later, Snards Keep Rockin' 



Soard Brother Bobby Beckett 



By Mike Gooding 

Sun Staff Writer - 

"It came to me in a 
dream," Bobby Beckett 
was saying of the name of 
the band he founded six 
years ago. "The name 
'Snard' shot into my head, 
amL I must have laughed 
for 10 minutes. I've used 
the name ever since. ' ' 

Beckett was q)eaking. of 
course, of the "Snard 
Brothers," an accoustic 
band that has tickled 
Beach natives and visitors 
since 1977. The group has 
undergone several per- 
sonnel changes since 
Beckett and Scott King 
first teamed up. The 
group today consists of 



Bow Creek To Host Sweetheart Bash 



A sweetheart dance for 
physically and mentally 
handicapped people will 
be held Saturday, Feb. 19, 
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
Location will be at the 
Bow Creek Recreation 
Center, 3427 Clubhouse 
Road. Virginia Beach. 

The dance will be spon- 
sored by the members of 
the Communications 
Workers of America, - 



AFL-CIO - Local 2202, 
CLASP (Citizens Loving 
All Special People) and 
the Virginia Beach £>epar- 
tment of Parks and 
Recreation. 

Participation is free. 
Refreshments will be ser- 
ved and door prizes will be 
given. The latest hits will 
be played. Parents and 
guadians are welcome, 
however, chaperones are 




Do«that 



They (musicians) make 
millions of dollars and they 
g§t. to the point where 
nothing matters 

anymore.' - Douthat 

Continued from Page 1 

wouldn't say. If I had ever seen him using drugs 
here at Michael's, I would have called the cops 
and he would have been busted a long time ago." 
"I've talked to him, but I don't really know him 
other than through socializing with him," said 
Douthat. "I don't know him well enough to say 
whether he's guilty or not. I will say this; he 
always lodced straight to me." 



present at all times. 

Transportation is avail- 
able from your area; 
however, CLASP must 
know by Feb.. 10. Call Joy 
Stinnett at 499-7619 
weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m. 

For further information 
call either John Ditty at 
424-6239 or Harry Baird 
at 486-3 110. 



Art For Kids 
Is Scheduled 

The Virginia Beach Arts 
Center will sponsor 
"Superfilmshow! Film as 
Art for Kids" fear free oti 
&$af consecutive ^urday 
afternoons in February- 
Tile progrartrUiB' been 
devel(vcd by the Ameri- 
can Federation of Arts 
Film Program to present a 
different type of film ex- 
perience to children. The 
shows are scheduled fot 
Feb. S, 12, 19 and 26 from 
3-4 p.m. 

The four-part series 
consists of 29 films select- 
ed by guest curator, Mari- 
lyn Singer, freelance film 
critic and children's 
writer. 



r 



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Beckett on accoustic 
guitar and vocals, Doug 
Cjowart on bass, and Tam- 
my Ibomas on keyboards 
and harmoiica. 

The Snards are sum- 
mertime fixtures at Ocean 
Eddie's Tropical Bar on 
the Virginia Beach Fish- 
ing Pier. When Eddie's 
'doses for the winter, the 
Snards hit the road, play- 
ing g|gs at other Beach 
nightspots. Qurently, the 
Snards can be seen at the 
Jewish Mother every 
Monday night and on the 
last weekend of every 
month. Also, the group 
plays every Ttiesday night 
at Laverne's Seafood and 
Beefbouse at the ocean 
front on 7th Street. 



"I love Virginia Beach; 
it has been very, very 
good to me," said 
Beckett, a native of Atlan- 
ta. "As long as 1 can 
continue earning a living 
here I'll stay. If you've got 
something local people 
like, thje^'ll come out. If 
they want a beautiful 
voice or a good guitar 
player, they can find it 
somewhere else. We use 
humcx' because we want to 
dier themsomething they 
won't get on the stereo or 
from the tube." 

A Snard show is laced 
with raunchy and bawdy 
wisecracks, many of 
which are submitted by 
the patrons. "Some 
nights, the crowd chants 



'Smut,' so we give it to 
them," said Beckett. 
"The humor we use may 
shock some people. Some 
lights, you get up on the 
stage and you feel a little 
cocky, so you try some- 
thing totally ridiculous. If 
the crowd likes it, we keep 
it." 

Sandwiched in between 
the comedy is a vast array 
of songs by contemporary 
singers such as Willie 
Nelson, the Beatles and 
Elvis Presley. No Snard 
show would be complete, 
however, without rendi- 
tions of tunes such as 
"What 1 Want- To Eat 
Ain't Got No Calories." 

"I don't have stars in 
my eyes like I used to," 



says the 34 year-old 
Beckett. "But sometimes, 
I turn on the radio and say 
to myself, 'I can sing as 
good as that guy.' Hope- 
fully, 1983 is going to be 
our year." Beckett added 
he hopes to one day 
record an album. "Some 
of it would be in the 
studio, and some of it 
would be Uve, to capture 
the essence o( what we 
do.", 

Beckett lives in the 
Laskin Road area of \^- 
ginia Beach with his wife, 
Kimberly, a Virginia 
Beach native. He has 
three daughters who 
nuige from age seven to 
16, and a seven^month old 
son. 



Kellam Holds Off Cox Comeback 



The Knights of Kellam 
Hgh Schod, led by Tim 
Christian, fought off two 
comebacks by the Falcons ' 
of Cox Kgh School, and 
registered 40-30 victory in 
weekend basketball ac- 
tioa. 

Christian finished the 
contest with 11 points, six 
in the third quarter. 
Knight Rdand Foreman 
threw in nine points. 

Kellam built up an 11-2 
advantage in the first 
quarter, but the winless 
Falcons held their oppo- 
nents to just one bucket in 
the second period, and 
tied the score by halftime 
at 13-aU. 

In the second half/ 
Kellam again ran away 
with the contest, buUdhig 
up another 11 -point mar- 
gin. Cox battled back, 
however, to pull within 
two pdnts. Down the 
stretch, Kellam was 
superior at the free-throw 
line, and the Knights 



wound up with a six-pdnt 
lead as time expired. 

Coach Joey Caruthers' 
Knights are now in a tie 
for third place in the 
Beach District with a 6-4 
record in district compe- 
tition and a 9-6 reco-d 
overall. The top four 
teams in the District ad- 
vance to post-season play, 
and Caruthers is ccmfident 
his squad will be one of 
them. 

"We finish up against 
First Ccdmial and Bay- 
side, and we should win 
both of them," he said. 
Caruthers refused to sin- 
gle out any one of his 
players, choosing instead 
to credit their victory to 
"sdid team play." "Cox 
did a fairly good job on 
us," he added. 

In other Beach play. 
Princess Anne defeated 
Bayside, 67-60, and First 
Cdooial t(q}ped Qreen 
Run, 78-48. 




Senior RolamI Fracfluui (22) Mda rckoud. 



Virginia Beach Arts Center Features Yarby 



- Continued from Page 1 

the sditude just after the 
performance and painted 
her seated with a bouquet 
of red roses. She is my 
ballerina, my memory," 
said Yerby. 

Yerby also stuped art 
at the Harepautian Stu- 
dios in Tehran, Iran and 
the McEvoy School of Art 



in Maryland. Her work 
has been exhibited in the 
Boardwalk Art Shmv and 
the Hilltop Art Show 
every year. In 1982, she 

was awarded "Best-In- 
Show" at the Lakeland 
Art Festival in Littletown, 
North Carolina and 
received honorable men- 



tions in 1981 and 1982 at 
the Peanut Festival in 
Emporia, Virginia. 

bicluded with her works 
at the Mimicipal Center 
show is a tryptych aS a 
Virginia Beach scene. 

The Municipal Center 
Art Show is free and open 
to the public. Ilie monthly 



show is locating in the 
second floor corridor oi 
the Gty Administration 
Building at Courthouse 
Drive and Northlanding 
Road, open Mondays 

through Fridays from 9 
a.m. to S p.m. Cdl 
425-0000 for additional 
information. 





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Virginia Beach Sun» February 2, 1983 7 



VIrsinIa Beach Sun News 



Citizeh Of The Week 





Mayor Loak R. Joiie. Ujomed by Coandlm.ii i*ck JeniiiiiKi ud Vice Mayor Barbara Hwiky la breaUai groaad. 



The Design Collaborative 



Bullington talks to students at Mn. Susan Danchise K-class at Malibii Ekmcntary 

Prosthesis Designer 

theGiftOf Movement 



Beach Solar Architect To Re-locate 



Synovc Bullingtai, who makes artificial limbs 
fw amputees, is this week's Virginia Beach Sun 
atizen-of-the-Week. 

When her husband, J(An, lost a leg because of 
diabetes nearly four years ago, Mrs. Bullington 
began devel<ving a new prosthesis iot him. 
the artificial limb he had was very painfiil and he 
was, for the most part, very limited in his 

mobility. 

"Jdin was far too young to be confined to a 
wheelchair," said BulUngtoo, So, for several 
vcars she reftied the artificial leg untU finaUy, m 
t jKT^SffShe succeeded in creating a comfortable 
f'Soduet. ^bon thereafter, however, J<An died at 
the age of 49. ^- 

"Tlie incentive was there," Bullingtai con- 
tinued. "John said he was willing to be a total 
guinea pig." It began as a leather harness, 
attached to a sawed off aluminum crutch and a 
board. Since her husband's death, though, 
Bullington had developed artificial limbs into 
space-age graphite devices, and she runs a 
business called Precision Prosthetics located m 
London Bridge, . „ 

"It's something that I thoroughly enjoy, 
explained BuUington. "If I can improve the 
quality of life for just one individual, it is all 



worthwhile. The customers I meet are the 
greatest, and I'm having simply a delightful time 
of it." 

Bullington estimates that in one year, she hat 
worked with and created artificial legs for dose to 
30 Virginia Beach amputees. The process is slow, 
she said, taking a minimum of four weeks to make 
a new leg. For individuals who have been 
amputated above the knee, Bullington said it 
takes at least six weeks to produce a leg. 

"1 know how traumatic it is to lose a limb,'' 
Bullington continued. "I remember how hard it 
was for J(4in. But I got into this business to help 
peqjle because they really need the help. I 
thought getting into this business that it would be 
really sad. I've found, however, that my 
custoners are very upbeat and positive. I've 
found it to be very rewarding." 

Bullingtcm, a 10-year Beach resident, resides in 
King's Grant with her five year-dd son. Her shop 
is open during regular working hours. Anyone 
wishing to reach her can call 4W.7017. 

The Vtrgbila Beach Sun cnconnigei recom- 
mendatiou from ito readers for tkc wecUy 
atizen-or-tlic-Weck. Send noininndoitt to: The 
Virginia Betudi Sun, 13S S. RoacaoHt Road, 
Virginia Bcadi, Va., 23482, or caB 4S6-3430. 



"We welcome the ad- 
dition of the city's first 
passive solar office 
building." Mayor Louis 
R. Jones told Laszlo 
Aranyi, president of 
Virginia Beach's The 
Design Collaborative, an 
architectural firm. "And, 
we also welcome the ad- 
ditional tax dollars you'll 
be putting into the city," 
he smiled. 

With that, Jones pushed 
a shovel into the soil, 



breaking ground for the 
firm's new two-story, 
11,00 square- foot com- 
plex. Lending a hand were 
Vice Mayor Barbara M. 
Henley and Lynnhaven 
Borough Councilman H. 
Jack Jennings. 

Located near Virginia 
Beach Boulevard behind 
Tandom's Pine Tree Inn, 
the building will reduce 
utility consumption by 50 
percent. This is because of 
the facility's unique 
design. Heating and 



cooling will be assisted by 
building orientation, in- 
sulation, building color, 
and other architectural 
features that permit heat 
gain in the winter and ex- 
clude sun in the summer. 

One special feature of 
the building's lighting 
system will be a light- 
sensor control which will 
automatically dim the 
electric lighting system as 
the outdoor light inten- 
sifies. 

The building, which was 



<-"t\ 



designed by the architec-' 
tural firm, will be shaped 
in a wide V, with an en-; 
tranceway at the point of : 
the intersection. An in- 
terior landscaped atrium 
lobby will contain plants 
and a bridge will connect 
the two halves of the up-: 
per floor over the atrium. 
Upper offices will open in- 
to the atrium. 

Aranyi said completion 
is scheduled for this sum- 
mer. 




Artist's rendition of new facility. 



Rnmug h Parade 

Spry Seniors Kicking 
Up Heels In Sprawling 
Kempsville Borough 

If you don't have entertainment in your Ufe, 
you get stale and old," declared Virginia Beach 
resident Douglas LeVesque, a spry 63 year-oW. 

So every Thursday morning, Douglas, named 
after Douglas Fairbanks, and her husband, Roger, 
68 travd to the KempsviUe Recreation Center to 
join two dozen other senior dtizens for two hours 
of square dandng. Koga is the president of the 
Senior Swin^^. the dght yearK>ld organizatton 
which sponsors the weekly shindig. 
"Whoi we first moved here two years ago, we 
didn't know anybody." said Henry Jackowiak. 
70 "We heard about this square dandng from 
some other senior dtizens, so we thought we'd 
give it a try. Thefriendship has been the best part 
oif it all. These ail such nice people; we've made so 
many new friends." 

"It was hard to learn how to square dance at 
first " chimed in Jackowiak's wife. EDa. 69. "I 
didn't know my left foot from my right, but it 
didn't matt« because I learned quickly and I ve 
had so much fun." 

••Besides the exercise, this gives the people an 
opportunity to sodaHze," added Rog« LeVwque. 

For Jimmy Simmons. 64, and hu wife, Vema, 
67, the 50 cenU they spend every week to take part 
in sauare dandng is money wdl spent. 

"You couldn't spend that Uttle money for four 

hours of this kind of fun anywhere," «" Jjn^y- 
"1 fiwi that remembering tlie stepa u good forthe 

mind because it is v«ry duUenpng," adds Vi^. 
"The whole world should be sjpiare danctaig. 

This senior dtizen group, which ra^ojf 
aae from 55 to'84. was founded in 1975 by Rober- 
ta Nagd, 73, wl» serves a the square dance 

•'calte.'* 
"We used to r> to dance with ptottmomi 

calkrs, but they're too fast for us," she s^. "We 

Shuttle bit dower." ^^»^'^.'^,^'^ 
dandng. as 1^ as ballroom dancmg. a^ the Bow 

Creek Recreation Cent». 




**Undermining" Hinted 



Kcnpivile li in tbe wcftera portton of VIriinia 
Bench, bordered by Chcsapeaitt uai Nerfoh to 
the west, by Chesapeake to the sonth, by the Prin- 
ccM Anne Bonwfh to the cart, amd by the 
Sonthen Sairead track and the Bnyridc Bwwih 
to the north. KcHVivyie's poprinllen ia catlMied 
to be 9t,5«4, the hneal to the dty. The bo«H«h 
haa n tolniland area of 16.634 iqwBC aciH or 24.4 

sqwHfci 



TIm soiiors are iqqivedative of Nagd's efforts, 
which are donioed free of dmwt. The 50 c«iU 
goes towards the mirdiase of rei»rds. "We 
(XMildn't do tUs without ha," said Douglas 
LeVesque. "BeMuse of her we ^ so much 
pleamre and so mi^ love." 

Na^. modcsUy. p»cs die buck. "Actualty." 
dMsaid. "we aU owe so nuMAU>tte city's Deptft- 
meit of Parks and Recreation. They have dooe so 
mudi for tlw senior dti^os here in Konpsville 
and aU oi^ die dty . We «N! so tiMokfol. " 

1^1^ mf onnMi<» aboA the ^vtofiiV Se^m 
can be <Atait«d by caU^ the Koni^vllle Carter 
at ^5-1892. 



Continued from Page 1 

Sciortino, who has found no fault with Wall's job 
performance, said the editorial comment was not fair to 

Wall. 

'•It was really unfair," Sdortino said. "As chief he is 
responsible for hU department, but sontetiml^fs, when 
you deal with human bdngs you goof. 

"A majOTity of people in the department support 
Chief WaU," Sdortino continued, "but there are some 
who don't want an outsider coming in. It would not 
surprise me that because he's an outsider some people 
might be out to undermine him. I know that this type ot 
diing happened to two outstanding pohce chiefs m Nor- 
folk and POTtsmouth." 

WaU holds the r«ponsibility of his department, but 
he does not have the power to impose mandatory 
disdpline when he feels it is warranted. He, or any one 
of his offidals can recommend a disciphnary action, 
such as a two week suspension for the misuse of a 
firearm. But the person to whom the discipline is 
administered can appeal the action to the Qty 
»MaMger. Chief WaU, or the dty's Personnel Board. 
Ihe Personnel Board has final veto power over any of 
the dty's department heads' dedsions or recommenda- 
tions. ., f 

WaU said this type of system has its problems lor 
administrators when it comes to personnel matters. 
"I have the responsibUity but not the authonty, he 

'*Tbe Personnel Board, made up of four local dtizens 
and a dty employee, is charged with making impartial. 
objective evaluaUons and decisions owcermng discipli- 
nary recommendations from dty department heads. 
Tbe system, however, has its advantages and 
drawbacks, aa»rdii^ to Sdortino. 

"ft goes both 4)vays." Sciortino said. "It prevcnu a 
department head or supervisor from being heavy- 
handed because of something like a conflict ol 
personaUties. On the other hand it is a UtUe bit of a 
problem as far as personnel administration goes 

In This situation, Sdortino says, the burden falls on 
die administrator tocarefuUy documem the grievances 
levied against a dty employee, but in the process the 
procedure should not hamper Uie offiaal s job 
effertiveness. . , . 

WaU admits that sometimes his people mate 

inMt^iies. 



1 don't expect my people to be perfect," he said. "I^ 
an officer is active he wUl make mistakes and get 
complaints from the public. But 1 wiU back my peopl^ 
unless they continue to make the same mistakes. M5t 
people don't feel, however, that they can't go out ancl 
do their job." : 

Wall recognizes what he describes as the awesome 
authority" police officers have: to carry weapons, and 
to take away one's freedom. But he tilso realizes that a 
police department is no stronger than the men and 
women who are members of it. : 

"Our people are our strength," Wall said. -Hiey arf 
good people, concerned, weU trained and we| 

equipped." ..^ 

WaU said it can be "traumatic" for an orgamzatwj»~ 
when a new leader comes on board, and even ihougj 
the Virginia Beach PoUce Department has been thrmigp 
this experience, "as far as 1 can determine, we're af 

good as ever." ? 

Wall and his wife Marion have two chUdren. BUIJ, 
14. and David, 8, and live in the Kempsville Borough ff 
the city, f 



IflWasMayor . . .j 
Check Auto Taxes i 

Terry Jordan loves Virginia Beach. She wants! 
that fact known to one and all. The cUmate is whatj 
«iK finds most agreeable, along with the annuaF 
Neptune Festival celebration. „, ul 

Given the chance, however, the Rices Nach-f 
mans sales clerk would make some changes. J 

"If I was mayor." she says. "I would gef 
together a committee and look at how other citiw 
tax their automobiles. I'd investigate this and sed 
what, if anyUiing. could be done for the People - 

Jordan, a one-year Beach resident, was appalled 
upon receiving her personal prop«ty assessment 
this year. "I have a 1972 Bu.ck that falls apari 
when you go down the road." she explains. It j 
^^d! tha' car. that I know it coukin't be worti 
$25. SUU. 1 had to pny $25 for die aty sticker an^ 
will be taxed anoth» $25 . It's ridiculous. » •. 



■■ 



Bttafll 



■■■■ 



"8 Virginia Beach Sun. Febniarv 2. 19R^ 



Virqinia Beach Business & Real Estate Hews 




■ ■^ ■ ' "-i^^ "T*^-i-5r 44.Tf J* ."^T-? \^- 




New Home 
Sales Manager 



Gifford Realty. Inc. announced today the ap- 
pointment of Edna LaFenne as New Homes Sales 
Manager. 

Ms. LaFerme is a Ucoued broker with 10 years 
experience in tlie Tidemiter real esUte market. 
Eight of those ten years have been <tevoted to the 
mana^ment and sales of large scale new sub- 
division pr(^)erties. 

The New Homes Divisi(»i will operate from 
Qifford's Haygood Office in Virginia Beach. 




Hoffman, Recipient 
President's Award 



Brownie Hoffman 



Brownie Hoffman 
was the deserving , 
recipient of the 1982 
President's Award. 

His outstanding 
professional and per- 
sonal attitude 
reprteents our proud 
example of a Gifford 
Associate. 

Criteria of 

President's Council: 

Attitude of love, 
constructive critizism. 



team spirit, loyality, 
belonging, being a 
party of and making 
us great. 

-^* 
This coveted award 

is given annually to 
the agent who best 
exemplifies the quali- 
ties of the Gifford 
standard of excellen- 
ce. 

This man meets all 
these criteria. 



*^ pROTHrrY 

MANAOmfiNT 

D^ASTMENT 

lOO's of homes, townbomes, apartments 

to^choos« from! 
NORFOIJK WIIGINU BBACH 




Lenox Garden Apartments 

400 Warwick Avenue 

Norfolk, VA 

Prime ioottion! Om bedroom, completely 

renovated! New carpet! New appliances with 

dishw«sh«rl £2S0. 

1547 E.UtUe Creek Rd. 
Norfolk. Vir^nia m\t 
BARil AiU S, Xmm. CPM 




Waslni^pWli^ 

688-690-^6 iitt»re Dr. 

riiiiniaB^,VA 

htew! Three b«^o(»as, dm, 2Vi Iwths. Firc- 

idace! KortiMBVt AMttin^. Ntio! Fm^ 

yard. S4S0. 

VIRGINIA BEACH OFFICS - 460-2428 

4505 HaygWKt Road 

VtfgniaB«di, Vhj^t 3^53 - ^, 

UWDA PAMttNriw^fBm MAN AGi» 




SCHOOL 

ISNTJUST 
FOR KIDS.... 



Since 1972 we've trained 

some of the most successful 

realtors and brokers in the 

Tidewater Area. Our graduates 

come from all walks of life. 

Some n^ke Real Estate a 

career, other enjoy the 

frc^om of part time selling, 

while many home owners 

take our course for 

their own personal 

knowledge. If you've 

evo- been intrigued by 

Real Estate, give us a 

caU toda^. Going to 

sch(K>l can be fun... and profitable. 



SURETY 

REAL ESTATE SCHOOL 

5737 Priocns Aimk Road 
Virginia Bcadi, VA 234U<tM) 4W.2395 




$2 Million Southgate Center 
Scheduled To Open This 
Month In Pembroke Area 



What business people in the Pembroke area call 
"Downtown Virginia Beach" will have a new $2 
million office building, lu location is particularly 
benefidal to business people interested in physical 
fltness. 

Southgate Centre is on South Boulevard, just 
off Independence Boulevard and the Norfolk- 
Virginia Beach £xpr«sway, one mile south of 
Pembroke Mall. 

Within quick walking distance of Southgate 
Centre is a racquetball club, the YMCA facilities 
at the United Way Family Center, and the jogging 
and cycling trails at Mount Trashmore. 

The develops and builder of Southgate in this 
recreiUion area is a physician. Dr. Robert W. 
Waddell, Virginia Beach orthopedic surgeon. 



"Had I decided on another building site, I 
would have included recreational facilities in 
Southgate." Waddell said, "because of the 
national boom in physical fitness, particularly 
with business people." 

The 45,000 square foot, three-story building's 
brick «[terior with reflective glass has high 
visability on the Expressway, and is designed to 
reduce fuel ONisumption. A closed-loop, water-to- 
air heat pump system provides heating and air 
conditioning. 

Officially open this month, Southgate Centre 
offers flexible office suite arrangements, ample 
'parking, and extensive landscaping. 

Architect for Southgate Centre was the firm of 
Walsh, Ashe and Dills of Virginia Beach. Leasing 
agent is The Katsias Company. 







141 Virginia Beach Blvd. West 

Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

Phone (804) 623-3831 

A MVBIOM or COLONIAL SERVICE COKPORATION 



0Alkuitic PermanBiit, M<»1gage CkmqMmy 

A WhoVy Owned &ibadiary of Atlantic I^maoent Fnleral 
Saving k IxMn Anodation 

$M4 IiKiependence Blvd. 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 234SS 

(904)460.1376/2810 



^Soiomad 




A Dl VBION OF COLOWAL SR VICE CORPOMTION 

Virginia Beach Boulevard West 

Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

Phone (804) 623-3753 




K^olomal ofitU 



k/ic 



gency 



A nvHON OF OOLOMAL SER VKX CXHtfORATKW 

141 Vir^nia Beach Blvd. West 

Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

Telephone: (804) 623-3831 



Cuttoniized 
Data 

Services ^usDat 
V Inc. 



Economical Computer Services 

for \^ 

Individuals and Businesses 

Customized Data Services, Inc. 

A Local Corporation 



Word Processing 

Manuscripts/Thesis * General Correspondence 

Resumes * Mailing List Preparation, Maintenance 

and Stfvi(» 

Finance 

Amortization Schedule 

Small BusiiMss Accmmtii^ 

GenmU Ledgo- * Paynril * Receivables * Payable 

* Invoitory * Sin^OMlsb^ts and Customized 

"Numba" - Crunching" 



547-5441 



MOVING? 





^'^^^^^^cnjii 



We won't carry the furniture, but we can help 
carry your load of problems. 
^^ Moving to a new homiv*«KMs town or atws " 
country is never easy. It can go a lot smoother 
when you work with us. We're a member of 
RELO® , world leader in relocation. And any 
move your family must make is a relocation. 

Just give us a call. We will be happy to explain 
our complete real estate/relocation services. 

CALLJOANN! 



MEfvieeR 




583-5976 
I -800-446-8559 



WORLD LEADER 
IN RELOCATION 




ffomelslliore 
Than Prv^ection From 
The Elements. 



You know how good your own home 
looks when you've been away? How 
content it feels to be safe inside on a 
cold winter's day? For three decades, 
it has been our privilege to help 
people discover the perfect house to come 
home to. And we'd be proud to help you. 



O'ifford 



r?EALTV INC 



Key People in Tidewater Kcsd Estate 
4505 Haygood Rd. 4M-2424 
1547 E. Uttle Creek Rd. 5t3-»76 



tmmmmmt 



■■ 



wmmmmm 



^^^w 



•^mmm^mmm 



VirguOt Beach Sun, February 2, 1983 9 



Virsinia Beach Business^ ft Reallstate Nellr 




A.J. Beninato 
Recieves 
Top Award 



A. J. Beninato and 
Sons Inc; have been awar- 
ded NorthAmerican Van 
Lines most prestigious 
award, "Top Quality 
Agent" for customer ser- 
vice and superior quality 
performance for 1982. 
This local agency, with of- 
fices in Virginia Beach and 
Hampton, has been 
associated with Nor- 
thAmerican Van Lines for 
over 31 years, serving the 
entire Tidewater area. 



Don't Miss 
The Bandwagon 




lerPyle 



Andrew S. Fiok 



Thad A. Broom, Jr. 

Broom & Fink Elects Officers 



Broom and Fink Ar- 
chitects and Planners, Inc. 
of Virginia Beach has an- 
nounced the election of 

Mr. Andrew S. Fink as 
president and Mr. Thad 
A. Broom, Jr. as secre- 
tary/treasurer. They will 
both serve one year terms. 



Fink, a Norfolk native, 
graduated from Columbia 
University and the Rhode 
Island School of Design 
and has practiced architec- 
ture in the Tidewater area 
for the past eight years. 
He has been associated 
with both private firms 
and the U.S. government. 



Broom, a graduate of 
West Point and Oklahoma 
State University has lived 
in and practiced architec- 
ture in the area for the 
past ten years. He also has 
experience with both 
private firms and the U.S. 
government. 

Since establishing their 



firm in 1980, Messrs. 
Broom and Fink have 
completed designs for 
commercial buildings, cn- 
dominiums, rehabiliation 
projects and custom 
residences. They also have 
conducted several exten- 
sive space planning studies 
for the U.S. Navy. 




Estes Thanked By Commission 



Ray Estes, a Virginia 
Beach real estate broker 
has served as a member of 
the Education Coor- 
dinating Committee of the 
Virginia Real Estate 
Commission for six years. 

The Commissioners ex- 
,pre^ed ^egret when Estes 
resigned from the- Com- 



mittee. In a letter to Mr. 
Estes, David Seitz, 
Assistant Director for 
Real Estate for the Depar- 
tment of Commerce of 
Virginia stated that 
"everyone will miss your 
reliable, consistent per- 
formance as a Committee 
member, and your 
willingness to go beyond 



the normal to give extra 
effort to your work." 

Charles C. Foxx is 
presently serving as a Real 
Estate Commissioner 
from Norfolk and James 
F. Tyler is the Chairman^ 



Gifford, 
From Sales 
To Service 

"Insurance is an in- 
tegral part of our client's 
real estate transaction. 
Our Insurance Depar- 
tment is here for their 
convenience." 

Gifford Insurance 
Associates Agency, Inc., 
headed by Francine Gif- 
ford Deir, is an Indepen- 
dent Agency. Separate, 
yet inhouse, Gifford spe- 
cializes in full personal 
lines services including 
hcxne owners, automo- 
bile, life, mortgage pro- 
tection and renter's insur- 
ance, as well as commer- 
cial lines. Representing 
several of the nation's 
most reputable insurance 
companies, Gifford Insur- 
ance^- Associates experi- 
enced staff can provide 



of the Commission. Hci . , , Vr a 7 
resides in Northern ui^aluable advice for any 



Virginia. 



of yoyr insurance neods. 



Recently I was amused by 
a cartoon of a man with a 
long gray beard and cane 
that was captioned, "The 
young man who waited 
for home prices to go 
down." Many a true word 
is spoken in jest. Real 
Estate values keep right on 
going up as part of the 
normal, business cycle and 
those who stand on the 
sidelines are missing out in 
lots or good things that 
home ownership can give 
to you. 

On page ^S of the 
December. 1982 Reader's 
Digest, Donald S. Stroet- 
zel has authoried an ex- 
cellent article on home 
buying. He calls home 
ownership "the housing 
ncaUtor." I have always 
called it a Bandwagon. 
You must get on it or it 
will pass you by. As~z 
home owner, you will en- 
joy: 

1. Pride of ownership. 

It's yours! You can put 
your labor into it and 
make it better and when 
you sell it you will receive 
a greater reward for that 
labor. 

2. A better place fw 
you and your family to 
live. Usually the home you 
purchase - even the first 
modest purchase - will 
have a nicer location and 
more luxurious amenities 
than anything you would 

.rent, p , 



3. T«i 'kmm ■ your 
broker cm etplain than 
to yoi). Yew Ift lodng lots 
of tjKik mam every day 
th^ you ^ B^ own y<Hir 
owowmic. 

4.deall^tt JsMitenI 
• o^w tM piA SO yfHini in- 
vatmenti that ou^^ot- 
med Retl Estate, in- 
cluding rwMentiai have 
beat very fue. How many 
can you flame? ^ years is 
a nice tnck record. The 
equity tlut builds in your 
hooM cao be t^rped lata 
for college tuition or 
whatn^ywmMd. 

In the Ri«der's Digest 
article. Mr. Stroetxel 
made two pc^ts that I 
thought wentipt^Bstijif : 

1. '^ yoft're buying. 




■ever start looking at 
houses as a first step. Sit 
down with your broker 
and banko- to determine 
your financial limiu. 

2. In discussing 
whether or not the first 
time homebuyer should 
buy now or wait, he 
recommends buy now, 
saying, "The important 
thing for the first time 
homebuyer is to begin 
building equity. Waiting 
to buy until you save more 
can be self-defeating if 
housing prices jump faster 
than you can accumulate 
cash for a bigger down 
payment." 

Don't let the Ban- 
dwagon pass you by. Sn 
you next week. 




Eve Sjlriipi, MliliM Dollar Agent; Don Huston, 
rrertifi^ "m* ShMcy Todd, MUUon Dollar 
A^^df Ceatwy 21, Metro Realty, ictumed last 
week frma the aanaal Ccntnry 21 international 
ConvcBtfoB held hi Hoaolnla, HawaU. 



Serving The Real Estate Needs 
Of Chesapeake 

WAINWRIGHT REALTY 

3237 Western Branch Blvd. 

In The Heart Of Churchland 



484-7777 



Members of Portsmouth, Chesapeake Multiple Listing Service 

Metro Multiple Listing Service 
Portsmouth, Chesapeake Board of Realtor; 






We'iYjtomber 1 
In Griit Bridge 



*BaaidMMIal 
• CopBiiHrlal 
•Faiw 

ifiertilliti 

Serviag dMnpcak* fltet U^ 



m 



l^icarbo* Jftic. 




MILDRED B RICAROO 
PRESIDENT 



351 Johntown Road, Chesapeake, Va. 



RiALTORS® 

• In the Heart o/Gr^t Bridge 



•S47-45S5 



Chesapeake Country 




908 Balf ord Lane 

Attractive Assumption 
A fireplace, three bedrooms, and a large lot 
maka this 6 year old brick ranch look like home. 
Call Vivian Neal, S47-3S54. 



524 Dove Drive 

Quality construction throughout shows in this 
comfortable ranch set on an oversized lot. 
CaU FiWKCi Hci^c, 482-1173. 




€f 



Rhodes Realty, Ltd. 

220 S. Battlefield Blvd. Ches, 
(804) 482-4771 



We're working hard to make you at home in Chesapeake'* 



NOW AVAILABLE 



Station One 
. 24th k Ocean Front 

^1^ Virginia Beach, Vii^ginia 




104 2-Room Suites 



v^ 



NEW CONSTRUCTION 



OCEANFRONTHESORT 
CONDOMINIUM 

24th & Atlantic 
Finest In Virginia Beach 
Own your own Oceanfront suite, not time 

sharing . From *8 1,500. Exclusive sales 
by PYLE REALTY 460-1777. 



Sales Of n 



;: 422-3185 (Eves.) Roger Pyle 
340-6441 

Wclcoac, 




WE ARE GETTING GOOD RESULTS 
92 Sold, 12 Rmm^ 



Kno# Us? 

We've Been Neighbors 
Vm 15 Years 

Since 1967 

We've Known Cheisapeake 

Real Estate 



We know the value of 
your home, 



w to sell it 




e.eAnd We Know 
Who Wants It! 







I Wnt$ Tmm H«mk..E^ Itay 



'mm 



mmmmmrnHmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm^mmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



wm 



■IVIiiV 



10 Virginia Beach Sun, February 2, 1983 

eumiiiiWlllllliillllllUlllinHIUIimilflHIIWIIlUiMttllUilMllliyillllMllttUlllillll 



u mr,i|Vii 



uuiaiimtnBtlllllliaHiUlhill 



milUimiUIHMIINIIIIIUIHIU 



,M;- J, ! 




iHiyiiiUnUuiillHHfl 



InlimiiBHDg 



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RllH|U||||Rlil||y klWyi^H^HUVHIIIIIIIUVHBHHIIMMHBIi*' 

Guide To Virginia Beach 



, "'■■ 



li 




i^^H'^h-wm 



.Jm^ 



Yesterdays' 

=^— — Treasures 
Todays* ^ 




•^olSS-* 






old"" , he 



Carraway House i 
317 S.Witchduck Road 

/t delightful trip into the 

past with ISth century 

reproductions and antiques. 

We carry something for 

everyone from Siieff 

Pewter and Baldwin Brass i 

to beautiful Madlsonl 

Square furniture. Alsot 

country items like candlesA 

folk art, primitive pain-\ 

lings, etc... gift Hems of a\ 

wide variety. Hours 10 til 5 

daily. I til 5 Sun. Closed 

' Wed. 

•1901 









oacfj 










/- ^il '^o/ '^'T?''** . 













fee:* St 



U have t'.. and ^^Ve 

I V ':; Flora' jS'Sippf 
1 ow' "!!; carry '^f-msl'"'*! 

in f ". Clo*:'"' rus"^ 
Eflgla"" uBiq"' Rock>*«" 






land 1 **''*r ^'^wp ' 
f „ ^ ^on, • fear V 














■^i-l''.. -i. 







^A< ^"^^ 




Jordan's country 

Shop „ _ . 

comer ofSalcmB^ 

WidRecfAtion Drive 



.<isii^ 




''■'■j. 



V- 



/. Hoffman Galleries 

2. Woodstock House 

3, Comer Cottage 



4. Jordan 'j Country Shop 

5. CountryM* Shops 

6. The Lady PvidUr 



kiilHI!ll{lililinMiiilHMI/iiH^ 



7. Mountaht Crafts 

8. Grmdma*s Attk, Inc. 

9. Cwrraway Hi^M 

illiiiii 



mm 



Virginia Bach Sun. February 2, 1 983 11 




The Woman's View 




Notes To My Friends.. 



Bf Ncm AaAonum 
AiidAiibor.JlailUMald 
,...As Kitty Kallen used to 
sing to us in the fifties. . .. 
September 3, 1980 

I've been hearing all my 
life, and you probably 
have too, tliat too much of 



a good thing can kill ymi. 

Well, add another 
health hazard to the list. 

If you don't, tiie Food 
and Drug Administration 
probably will now that 
Theodore Kemper and 
Rosalynn Wallach Bologh 
have finished their resear- 
ch. 

They say it's healthy to 
do this the first time and 
even a second and third 
time, perhaps over the 
course of a lifetime. But, 
do it too often, and you 
may turn up with nervous 
disorders, digestive 
problems, headaches, 
rashes and severe itching. 

What is it you ask? 







Porcelain 

& 

Acrylics 

THE LATEST IN APPLIED NAILS 



Jordan's Country Shop 



'Back To Basics' 




r \ 



Barbara Niles Beauty Spa 

The Original Nail People 

Call for an Appointment 
Telephone 497-4759 490-9287 



Falling in love. 

I guess the old pom 
will have to be amentted. 

It's better to have loved 
and lost - in moderation - 
than never to have loved 
at all. 

Septembers. 1980 

I always enjoy those lit- 
tle features on the ^t 
and ui the papcn that 
mention the important 
birthdays and historical 
events that took place on 
this day. It's always easy 
to use hindsight to bear 
and note how this or that 
changed history. 

It was on this day in 
1974, for instance, that 
President Ford pardoned 
Richard Nixon. 

Back in 1935, Huey 
Long was assassinated. 

Back in 1664, Peter 
Stuyvesant surrendered 
New Amsterdam to the 
British, who chose to call 
it New York. 

But the event I would 
choose that seems to me to 
have had more effect on 
the way we live than any 
of the above happened fif- 
ty years ago today ...and 
involved a man named 
Richard Drew. 

Richard Drew wasn't a 
statesman, or a politician 
and as far as I know, 
never won any wars or 
discovered any countries. 

He did, however, invent 
Scotch tape. 
This series of excerpu from 
"Notes To My Friends" is 
brought to you through the cour 
tesy of The DoaBiag Conpaay , i 
local publishing firm, and Jim 
Kincaid. The book is a vailable in 
most boolt stores. 



Jordan's Country Shop 
is a shop that is interested 
in the tesics. Simple fun- 
ctional designs without 
frills. This shop developed 
frtHn a love of country 
primitive furniture. 

As a collector for many 
years and a desire to share 
some of their finds, they 
appreciate new as well as 




Just a small portion of lovdy item avidablc at lonfaui'i 



old because the well made 
reproductions will be our 
antique later on. Today, 
anything hand made is 
respected. Natural 
materials are admired; the 
grain of wood and the 
form of clay. 

Folk art if becoming 
popular both old and new. 
They all reflect our 'back 
to basics' approach to 
living and our enjoyment 
of simple pleasures. 

The old house that ser- 
ves as the shop has come 
full-circle. It was a coun- 
try store about 8S years 
ago. It sits on a corner of 
the Jordan's farm and is 
convenient for all the 
family to help. 



"We are excited about 
the country look, Mrs. 
Jordan said, our look is in 
and we are ready to help 
anyone with this style of 
decorating". 

Among the many items 
one will find at Jordan's 
are tab curtains. These 
add such a simple touch, 
but are so appropriate. 
Add quilts for color, twig 
baskets, and salt-glazed 
crocks, allso useful. 



With much emphasis 
being placed today on 
"The Country Look", 
you will really enjoy your 
visit to Jordan's Country 
Shop, whether just 
browsing, or with a cer- 
tain item in mind. 

The shop is located on 
the comer of Sakm RMd 
and Recreation Drive in 
Virginia Beach. Make this 
a pleasant stop when you 
are in the area. 



Old age has crept up on the United States Coast 
Guard. The December Reader's Digest reports that 
much of the USCG's fleet is so old that of nine ships 
randomly chosen for review recently, not one was able 
to stay at sea even fifty percent of the time. 



Next Week 

Look For 

'The Uprooted Gounnct* 

With More gourmet recipes. 



,ANNOUm^EMENTS 



Parents Without Partners, Chapter 166 

Parents Without Partners Tidewater Chapter 166 is 
seeking new members among those parents wno are 
single due to the deaUi of, or divorced or legally 
separated from the spouse or never married and now are 
interested in broadening their scope of life. 

Custody and age are no barriers. An introductory 
meeting wiU be held at 1 148 Pickett Road on Feb. 2 at 8 

p.m. 
For further information, call 855-7661 . 



Soathslde Business and Profcnional Women's Ciab 
of Chesapeake, VirgiBla 

The Southside Business and Professional Women's 
Club of Chesapeake, Virginia will hpid their February 
meeting on Monday, Feb. 14 at 7 p.m. at Nick's Steak 
House, 1 125 South Military Hwy., Chesapeake. 

At this meeting the presentation of Young Careerist 
Award will be announced. All members are urged to at- 
tend, and visitors and guests are welcome. 

For further information, contact Barbara A. Huettig, 
547-8121, Ext. 1100 



EIFTS 




Brenda Smith ^ 
Michael Smith 

Country Accessories Country Curtabu 

Handmadeltems Hand Crafted Furniture 

Candles and Oil Lamps 

Hours: 

Monday - ^tuntay t*^'-* 
Sunday 1-5 |>.b. 




Conntry Touch 

•COUNTRY ACCESSORIES" 



Hopeless? 



It Needn't Be! 



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Services, Inc. 

424-4118 



Clearance Sate 

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GEORGIA'S^, ^ 

HAIRSTYLES 



INTRODUCTORY 
FREE FACIAL 

withtlWDew 

OIL OF MINK 

SKIN CARE PROGRAM 

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The 
Hint 
Man 

By Chuck Faulkner 

Carpet, Venovlag GrcaM 

- Immediately cover tht 
affected,area with flour; 
whiting, or cornstarch. 
Leave for two hours, 
brush off the flour, 
whiting, or cornsurch; 
ttam rub the spot with a 
doth soaked in turpen- 
tine. 

Carpet, Renovlag MudMy 
Spots - Sprinkle common 
salt on the affected area. 
Wait ten to fifteen 
minutes, then sweep up 
the salt with a small brush. 
If the carpet remains 
moist, dry it with paper 
towels |»essed down with 
some heavy object, or use 
your hairdryer. 
Carpet, Stalled With 
Soot, Lead, Or Black 
Skoe FoUsh • A soft cloth 
soaked in rubbing alcohol 
should do the trick. 

A teaspoon or two of 
fulla's earth with one- 
half CUD of cold water and 




one-half cup of ammonia 
is also very good. Apply to 
the affected area and rub 
from outside to center, 
both clockwise and coun- 
. terclockwise. Allow the 
aitSi to dry,' then brush 
well. 

Carpet Hole, Repairing - 
If the hold is not too large, 
clean up the edges of the 
hole, or if it is burnt, 
scrape off all the burnt 
edges. Now, pluck some 
matching Titers out of the 
carpet. Squeeze some 
quick-drying glue into the 
hole and , using tweezers, 
insert the fibers into the 
hold. When the diue is 
dry, gently brush the nap 
upwards. 



Chuck Faulkner is brought to 
you through the courtesy of The 
Doaaiag Company, a local 
publishing firm, and Chuck 
Faulkner. The book is available 
in most book stores^ 




Special 
Discount 



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Chesapeake Chimney 
Sweeps And General Repair 

482-1179 



If ywi have Nm puttfBt »H haviiq 
yow chiBMey dcaacd Imcmm of the coit 
or other rcasoM, you don't have lo wait 
aay longer. I kaow thai limes are hard 
ami we wUI do what we can lo help you 
caic the hwdea. Chimney Fires can be 
very dangcroaa lo your home and family. 
We wU deal aay oae or two ilory chim- 
aey for the low coal of '25. There will be a 
•5 Service Charge lo paU out your wood 
itove laaert aad replace it. This ii a 
Hadlcd offer. So Doa'l Delay! If you have 
aay ^i^ palatl^t or carpeatry work 
thai wU aecd doiai, we can give you a 
fitc ctlliaaic. 

Boh Stewart Stale Reg. #015061 
Jeff Stewart Hoadtd 




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We have styUng choice 
for everyona and for 

tMa^l 
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Also 3 laloM ia 
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6220 Indian River Road 
Virginia Beacii, Va., 23464 

Phone 420-9206 



SPECIAL 
DISCOUNT 
WmiTHIS 
AD 




INTRODUCING 

NEW LANDSCAPING 
SERVICE 

^^SEASONS And REASONS'' 




Sterling Florist 

And Greenhouses 

17$2 Vbfinta Beach Boulevard 
Virginia Be^h, yirginia, 2}4S4 
Chris Sterling 422-2501 



\ 



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wm&mmm 



ip Virginia Beadi Sun. February 2, 1983 

t 
t 

k 

J ' . 

I The Church 

\ Is The People 



CHURCH NEWS 



-¥u 



The People. 
Are the Church 



Open Door Chapel - Eight Years Of Outreach. 



"People should be discipled and nur- 
tured" — Rev. Fritz Stegemann 



\ The (^)en Door Chapel 
v^U be eight years old this 
cpming August. The 
fellowship began in the 
6lks Lodge in the 
RSosemont area and from 
tfiere moved to Holland 
^oad where the ministry 
apd attendance grew im- 
n^ely. Now the chapel 
is: located in the old Prin- 
ces Theatre and shopping 
nfall. 

I The church has changed 
significantly since its days 
ai Holland Road. Pastor 
Stegemann feels that 
people should be discipled 
and nurtured and because 
of this, many outreach 
ministries have developed. 
During the week the 
pastor keeps very busy 
with seven sermons iii ad- 
dition to hosting a daily 
radio show. 




clothes. Also it wts as 
assistance to peo|^ who 
have lost hom« due to fire 
or other circumstances. 
People who can afford to 
pay can obtdn dothei 
there for tremendously 
low prices. 

Christian education is 
an extension of Open 
Door's goal in Christian 
disdplnhip. A new Bible 
collie opened recently to 
teach the Bible from 
"cover to cover." A high 
school program is preien- 
tly underway with 34 
students attending. 

Located on 25 acres of 
land. Open Door Chapd 
has plenty of room to ac- 
commodate future growth 
and development. 

There is a deq> concern 
for meeting the needs of 
the people. Of course this 
is not just for the people 
who regularly attend Open 
E>oor Chapel, but for all 
who are in need. 

There is a pleasant at- 
mosphere and a feeling 6f 
desire to serve. 




first Baptist Chnrck of Norfolk 

Paul Schumacher presents a special concert of 
traditional songs and hymns along with contem- 
porary $aa[td selections on Sunday, Feb. 6 at 7:00 
p.m. 

Rev. Schumachn recorded nine albums, the 
latest "The Heavens Declare". 



Glad Tidings Assembly Of God 

On Sunday, Feb. 13 at 6:00 p.m., "Praise 
GiUhering", a youth musical sung by Celebration, 
a seven member youth ensemble presenting, "First 
Love". 



ladUiB River Baptist Church 
A family film series, "God's Pattern For 
Living, dealing with the relationships, wives, 
husbands, children, pafents, broken homes, 
divoreed UMi ronarried persons. 

The series will be held on Sunday evenings at 
7:30 p.m. starting Feb. 6 and running through 
March. 13. 

A nursery will be provided. 



Worship Services 



One outreach ministry 
is a restaurant where lun- 
ches are served to the 
public daily. 

Originally opened as a 
soup kitchen to feed only 
the poor, it now is opened 



to ^he public on a non- 
profit basis. The only 
thing that is asked is an 
offering. 

Another outreach is the 
thrift shop where people 
who are poor can obtain 



Sunday 

Sunday School 9:15 A.M. 

Worship Service 8:00 A.M. 

10:30 A.M. 

Praise Service • 6:30 P.M. 

Tuesday 

Bible Study • • • .10:00 A.M. 

Wednesday 

Mid-week Service 7:00 P.M. 



mmmmm 




Sun<;iay 

John 

20:11-18 

■ Monday 

John 

20:19-23 

Tuesday 

John 
20:24-31 

Wednesday 

John 

21:1-14 

Thursday 

John 

21:15-25 

Friday 

Mark 

16:12-18 

'Saturday 
Matthew 
28:16-20 



ALERT ! 



Every muscle tense . . . every sense attuned to their surroundings . . 
. they're ready I A scent, a sound, a glimpse of the unexpected and 
they will streak silently into the forest. They*re alert, but their aler- 
tness indicates a readiness to run away. 

Rightly man scorns that kind Of alertness. For human achievement 
is born of a different alertness. When men are awake to their oppor' 
tunities, alive to their responsibilities, brave to their challenges . . . 
then progress is realized, goals are rwched. 

Our religion helped to establish this human standard of alertness 
and our churches constantly inspire meh to achieve it. For when the 




Scriptures selected by 
The American Bible Society 



mind is attuned to life's environment, and 
the soul is attuned to God, then a man has 
the wherewithal to go forward to grater 

goals. 

True alertness begins when we discover 
the riches and fulfillment regular worship 
can add to our lives. 



■THOpCflDOOr (804)340-1441 

■ IChapei 

3t77 V«. BeKb Blvd., Va. Beach, Va., 23452 



X 

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^jiUiii USX h 3u iii.j ijiii 7r7>„n 



SUNDAY 

SuteySdmol 9:1SAM 

WMihipSmiM IrMAM 

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Pfi teS Trke fcMPM 



TUESDAY 

Bibk Study 10:00 AM 



WEDNESDAY 

Mid-wcck Service, 



.7:WPM 




SUNDAY 

t-.MAM. 

I»:4SA.M 
tMAM. 






1 JOlS.NcwtowaRowl 
^Norfolk, V«., 23502 

461-5041 



WEDNESDAY 

T:M P.IM. Fnll> NItM AclMlia 

DAILY 

MelafVt.lck.-Narf. 



R. L. Kay, Pastor Danny R. Thomas, Associate Pastor 



^ > PI 






c 



PROVIDENCE ROAD - VIRCINIA BEACH. VIRGINIA 

('JV«JW*<n n«fttai^ A4^Way «n4 bMi,*4an !nu2<i 'KaMi4l> 



I 



<f> 



Pastor: Rev. John R. Carraway 
Phone 424-2276 




4M miTAnOM TO meWMTOPS 
TOTAL-FAmLYCmmCH 

INDIAN mVER 

BAPTIST CHURCH 

1600 LmmlA¥9mf 

Cfi«tap««lr0, Va., 21325 

Phate W. McSwain, Jr. Pastor 
424-5700 



Kings Grant Baptist Cliurch 

873 Uttle Neck Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

SUNDAY 

«:NaJB. WEDNESDAY 

Forily Niglil Disner. 6:00 p.m. 



..9:M».B. 

.lMta.H. GrMMOriMrca't 

Manlii«WflnMp..llMa.H. OMin 6:30 p.m. 

,.^Mf.m. PnycrScrviK 6:45 p.n. 

Jerry Holcomb, Pastor 
340-0902 



CALVARY 

ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

4925 Providence Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Leonard Campbell, Pastor 

495-1004 

Youth L.I.F.E. Saturday, 7 P.M. J 



Now AvaUtMe 
For Rental 




Video Cassettes Include: 

•jMMfDokton • BUI» Graham 

• Llojrd OfUvte • Ann Kiemel 

• ivyct Landorf • Hnmpl> 

• DavM Mace • An}^ Grant 

For BiMc inf onulkM, taM|uire at 

Longs Religious 
Supply 

'Ytmr Christian Su/^y Headquarters ' 

»!• Mertcdio Ave., Norfolk, Va. 

627-04S9 


r 1 
I/I/HI/ 




Word 
Home Video 





Cedar KoaJ ^iimmbl^ of QoJ 




9ie CEDAR ROAD 

GAEAT BRIDGE 

CHESAPEAKE. VIRGINIA 2}320 

TELEPHONE S47-i$51 or Mr H33 



of&Qrh 







H 




312 



Ken Hemphill, Pastor 

, fimit^, Va., 23502 m-tOt 



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Virginia Beach Sun, February 2. 1 983 13 



^Magical' Wax Museum Headed 
By California-bred Magician 



By Jackie Mattlttws 
SuaCorrespoiidHit 

ThCTe is Mmeddiit magk about The Royal LaaOoa 
Wax Museum (»i Adantic Avenue. Not only does the 
tour throu^ Uie museum cause Uhuions of the i»st ami 
present but the nuuMfer. Kim Dixon is also a magidaD. 

I^on, 26, has bem involved with show buaimss ance 
age three. His parents. Jimmy and Marylynn EHxon, 
have spent their lives as entertainen. Jimmy has 
traveled an over the Wwld perfcmninf as a ma^dan. 
escape artist, cMnedian and sinfCT. Marylynn anisted 
ho' husband with magic aiui is also a (Janco-. At one 
time they owmed and operated several wax museunu. 
This prepaid Kim for his ivesat j(^. 

I^cm movedlo VIrgintt Beach from Los Vegas. 
CA, about six months ago to become the general 
manager of the Wax Museum. He stU fills in for his 
Dad omx in awUle when bootinp get too heavy. Like 
his father he too is very ocp^oiced as a performer. He 
has taken his show to every state in Uie Utdted States 
and providence in Canada. 

He is not only a magician, but has been a model, 
made commercials and been in movia. He says being an 
emcee and organizing shows and circus perfomuu^es 
were the most eqjoyabte jobs he has had. He has heea 
phot(^aphed as a Burt Reynolds look-a-Uke. also of- 
fered a |wrt as Reynold's look a like in a movie on 
Playboy cable T. V. Dixon sUted he did not want to con- 
dnue rushing to catch that train or plane for the next 
show and always living out of a suitcase. "I wanted a 
job I would enjoy and be able to come home each ni^t 
to my wife and childrai," he said. "I believe I've found 
it and a new home. I've travded so much that I bdieve 
I'm an authority on people. Since I've beoi in Virginia 
Beach, I've found the people hoe to be warmer than 
anywhere in the United States. I also oijoy the drastic 
weather changes. 1 re^y like the beach and going to the 
Tidewater Dinner Theatre. One of my favorites was 
touring the CBN Studio. We are now attending The 
Church of Christ on Witchduck Road and calling 
Virginia Beach home. We feel like true Virginia 
Beachers." 



The Wax Museum is located in the old Bayne Theatre 
building. 

The theatre was turned into museum in two months 
and (^>ened in May, 1982. The temperature is kept bet- 
ween 55* and 70* to protect the wax figures. 

Most of the figura are actually flber glass bodies with 
only the otposed flesh areas bdng wax. These figures 
cost between $3,000 and $4,000 dollars. The few that 
are totaUy wax cost betwmi $10,000 and $12,000 
dollars. Many of the figures are wearing the personal 
clothes of the character, such as Mae West and Hugh 
Hefner. All of the figures are imported from Josephine 
Tuasaiula Studios of Londmi; each taking six to eight 
months to research and are life-size to the character they 
protray. 

They are jointed so they may be placed in any desired 
position. Electronic needles are used to place each 
strand of hair individually on the figures head. Hair is 
also placed into the face of the male figures and then 
shaved. &irgical eye balls and real dentures are used, aU 
to make the figures more life-like. 

"We hope to evoitually have a display showing the 
proceu of a wax figure bdng made. From the clay 
modd to the plaster mold to the wax and plasto- 
product," Dixon sud. 

Hie two-decker bus owned by the.^useum is used to 
pick up organized grou|» and transport them to and 
from the museum, as a courtesy to the guests. The ad- 
mission to tour the museum is $3.50 for adults and 
$1.75 for children. 

This museum is one of 16 built by George Dnicker, 
president of The International Ldsure Corp. Five are 
located in Japan, one in Singapore, two in France, one 
at Lourdes in France, one in Hong Kong, one in Taiwan 
and several in the United States. Plans are to build one 
in Egypt and Korea very soon. 

IXxon says he is trying to create an educational attrac- 
tion as well as an entertaining experience for the guests 
of the museum. It is true that the museum has a magical 
effect and if you don't believe it ask Kim Dixon as he 
qjpears and disappears throughout the museum. 



Continental Telephone Has New Symbol 



Continental Telephone 
of >%ginia's parent com- 
pany is adopting a new 
corporate symbd, Vir- 
ginia Beach customers 
lave learned, that will 
soon be appearing on 
customers' phone bUls 
and bill inserts, according 
to William Watscn, Direc- 
tor - Public Affoirs in 
Mechanicsville. 

Watson said that the 
new logo will be a styUzed 
rendition of the word 
"OONreL" in burgundy 
and gray. Eventually, the 



new logo will completely 
replace the cunent phone 
company's symbd, which 
is a large, black "C with 
a smaller "t" and a 
picture of a telephone 
receiver set inside. 

"Our customers can ex- 
pect to see the new 
CONTEL symbd on their 
monthly phone bills start- 
ing in April and they will 
probably see announce- 
ments in some national 
magazines even before 
that," said Watson. 

According to Watson, 



Continental Celecom Inc., 
the parent company, 
plans the changeover to 
the new symbol to be a 
gradual process. "It's 
going to be a while before 
people see the new l(%o 
on every piece of station- 
ery or on all the installers' 
vans," he said. 

Fred McKkhee, Conti- 
nental Telecom Inc.,'s 
coordinator for industry 
retetions in Atlanta, said 
the conversion is going to 
be step-by-step instead of 
overnight because of ex- 



pense,'" he explained. 
"In other wwds, every- 
thing that's now in stock- 
from letterheads to man- 
uals-will be used up 
befcxe any new material 
with the new symbd is 
used." 

"There might be some 
initial confusion," said 
Watson, "when our cus- 
tomers see the word 
"CONTEL' on their bilk, 
but they stijl see the 'big 
C and little t' ai our 
vehicles and oi the sign in 
frait of the office. 




Kin Dixon ud Fraaiwaitin, ihow ■ciabcn of Cab Seoul Pack 419, Dca 1, wommI ■ucam. They are: Pclcf Goofaul ud Jmo* Gordon (f real 
row), and Chrii WcdMUM Md KcHy Matlfecwf . 



Pampango Club Names New Officers 



By Alfredo L. Lingad 
Special To The Sun 

A new set of officers 
were recently elected to 
head the Pampango 
Language Club of 
Virginia Beach for the 
coming year. 

Held at the Ascension 
Catholic Church in Kem- 
psville. the election 
marked the reappointment 
of Dick Dabu as pr^ident 
of the group. Also elected 
were: Pike Pineda, vice 
president; Angelina Aran^ 
da, secretary; Fe Laxa, 
assistant secretary; Nellie 
F. Dabu, treasurer; Tessie 
Vitug, assistant treasurer; 
Leo Bantay, business 
manager; Bert Balingit, 
assistant business 
manager; Romeo 

Calilung, public relations; 
and Romulo Alejandro, 
auditor. 

Sergeants-at-arms are: 
Pacing Flores, Greg 
Vitug, Asio Laxa, Eugene 



Aquino, Boy Uambing, 
and Virgilio Aranda. Ad- 
visors are: J. Julao, Leon 
Marcelo, Dado Paras, 
Roger Qozun, Jet Laxa, 
Emy Perez, and Col. Leon 
Punsalan (U.S. Army, 
ret.) Club counselor and 
legal advisor is Frank Ar- 
ness, attomey-at-law. 

Past activities of the 
club include: its different 
involvements with the 
Council of United Filipino 
Organizations of Tide- 
water; its continuous 
preservation of good 
relationships with natives 
of the 7,100 Philippine 

r ' 



Islands, and its con- 
tributions to scholarship 
funds and to individual 
relief funds. 

"In addition to the 
club's traditional activities 
and projects, we will be 
further involved in com- 
munity projects," noted 
President Dabu. "The 
Pampangos must be aware 
and conscious of their 
obligation and respon- 
sibility to the community 
and to the government." 

Dabu said he would also 
like to see an increase in 
the organization's mem- 
bership. 




Dick Dabu 



VBGH's Thomas Certified By ANA 



Paula V. Thomas, 
R.N.C., maternal-child 
educator at Virginia 
Beach General Hospital, 
has become certified as a 
high-risk perinatal nurse 
by the American Nurses' 
Association. 



Certification recognizes 
advanced clinical know- 
ledge and skills involved 
in the nursing care of 
high-risk mothers and in- 
fants during pregnancy, 
labcn- and delivery, and 
the postpartum period. 



Requirements for certi- 
fication include continu- 
ing educaticMi, a compre- 
hensive written examinat- 
ion, and extensive clinical 
experience in perinatal 
nursing. 



Virginia Beach Public Notices 



ji 



UgalNatlea 



Virginia: In the Clerk's 
Office of^ Circuit Court 
of the City of Norfolk on 
the 21st day of January, 
1983. 

Joseph James Cotton vs. 
Ethel Minett Lassister 
Gotten, Defendant. 

The object of this suit is 
for the ccmiplainant to ob- 
tain from the defendant a 
divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii upon the 
grounds of oiie year 
separatioa without 
cohabitation or interrup- 
tion. 

An affidavit has been 
made and filed t^tjhe 
defoidant is not a resident 
of this State, it is ordered 
that she answer in writing 
on or before the 11th day 
of March. 1983 and 
protect her interests 
herdn. It is ordered J^t 
this order be publSied 
oMe a week for four suc- 
cessive weeks in the 
Virginia Beach Sun a 
newspaper published in 
the City of Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

Teste: 

•Hugh L.Stovall, Clerk 

Gwendolyn K-Mayo, 

D.C. 

Arthur G. McGowan p.q. 

181.12 4T 2/16 VB 



UgalNatica 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Propoaed Mihinv Fn>ied 

Route 190 

'(KenvntneRoad) 

aty of Virginia Beach 

All iterated penou 

an uAvvei that the State 

H^way and Tnoqior- 



tation Commission of Vir- 
ginia has approved the 
location and m^or design 
features for Route 190 
(Kempsville Road), 
Project 0190-134-103. C- 
301, from 0.13 nyie south 
of Indian ttbra Road to 
0.20 mite south of Center- 
vilte Turnpike, in the City 
of Virginia Beach. 

The above action is ten- 
tative poKUnf a^roval of 
the final environmental 
assessment by the Federal 
Highway AdministratitMi. 

^teps, drawinp, an en- 
vironmental assessment 
and (rther inf ormaticm are 
aviHabte m the Depart- 
mmt's District Otfkx at 
Suffolk, and in its 
Re^dency Office locked 
at the intersection of 
Business Route 13 
(Military Highway) and 
Rmite 168 in Chesapeake. 
tcft viewing by faiterested 
perstms. 



State Hi^nvay and 
Transportation Com- 



of Virginia 
S83-11T2/2VB 



LEGAL NOTICE 
Take noti<% that on 
February 11. 1^3, at 
lOKX) a.m. at the {^anises 
of Tidewater Imports, 
Inc. DBA HaD Ptmtiac 
CMC Honda, Inc. 31S2 
Virginia Beach Blvd., 
Vi^ida Beach, Virgn^ 
234S2, the undersign 
will s^ tt jwbUc aucttai. 
fw mA, reiervim unU> it- 



UgslNatice 


hMcNawiag 



sdf the right to bid, the 
foUowing motor vehicles: 

1980 Spirit, Serial 
AOM430B297711; 1977 
Pontiac, Serial ilClT^l- 
U507365 

Tidewater Imports, Inc. 
DBA HaU Pontiac GMC 
Homla, Inc. 
F. C. Rice 
Comptroller 
181-13 2T 2-2 f^ 



LEGAL NOTICE 
Take Notice that on 
February 16, 1983 at 10:00 



a.m. at the premises of 
Tidewater Imports, Inc. 
DBA HaU Pontiac GMC 
Honda, Inc. 3 132 Virginia 
Beach Blvd., Virginia 
Beach, Va. 23432, the un- 
dersigned will sell at 
public auction, for cash, 
resCTving unto itself the 
right to bid, the following 
motor vehicles: 1982 
Honda Accord, Serial 
ll'JHMSZ3329CC068934. 



Tidewata Imports, Inc. 
DBA HaU Pontiac GMC 
Honda. Inc. 
183-11 IT 2/2 VB 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Bea^ B<Mrd of Zoning Appeals wiU con- 
duct a PubUc^Hearing tm Wednesday, February 16, 
IMS. at 7:30 p.m. in the CouncU Chambers of the City 
IbD Bttikling, Municipal Centa, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. Tlw staff briefing wiU be at 6:43 p.m. hi the 
aty Mana^'s Confo-ence Room. The fdlowing ap- 
idicatioiB wiU appear on the agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 

1 . Frank and Betty Jamiscm requests a varian(x to aUow 
parking of ma^ot reoeational equipmmt in front of a 
buHdfaig insteul of bdiind the nearnt portion of a 
Iniilding adJMOit to a imMic street on Lot 33, Westview 
Village, 732 Arvin Roid. Kemi»viUe Borough. 

2. Carl F. Sterns requests a variance to aUow parking 
of major recreational equipment in front of a building 
inste»i of behind tte unrest porti<» of a building ad- 
jacoit to a public street on Lot 138, Secticm 3, Sun- 
stream Park, 3932 &instream Parkway. KmpsviUe 
Borough. 

3. WOliam Russdl Catlln requests a variaiKC to aUow 
parking of majtM' recresdonal equqNnat in front of a 
bulkiing instead of behind tlM ittar»t pcwtion of a 
buikiing adjKat to a pubUc stre^ <» Lot 13, Uock 1, 
Secticm 2, Pocahontas ViUage. 4960 Namgansett 
Mve. lUmpsviUe Bwmagh. 

4. La Qimtfa MtMor byis. Inc. reque^ a variance of 134 
Sipiare feet of sgn aiaa to 284 sqwue f e^ of ngn area 
io^ad <rf ISO iquve fe^ of agn area aaaltoi^ and to 
aOow the tnt-^m^^ ^ to be 1^ square fe^ per 
face i^lMd of 123 square fett pm tmot as aDowed on a 
Pv«el, P^ Mcafkws, Newtown Ro«i. Kem{»ville 
borm^. 



Public HMfiiii 



^nMC immotS 



3. Jackie Mckinney requests a variance to 9.2 feet to a 

20.8 foot front yard setback instead of 30 feet as 
required (residential addition - porch) on Lot 13. Block 
2, Boulevard Manor, 287 Toy Avenue. KempsvUle 
Borough. 

6. Gary A. Weaver requests a variance of 8.3 feet to a 
1.3 foot side yard and rear yard setback instead of 10 
feet each as required (accessory building - storage shed) 
on Lot 4, Block G. Lake Front VUlage, 2121 Kimball 
Circle. Bayside Borough. 

7. C. P. HoUand, Jr. by J. Peter HoUand requests a 
variance of 0.3 feet to a 9.7 foot front yard setback in- 
stead of 10 feet as previously granted by the Board of 
Zoning Appeals on June 3, 1974 on Lot 1, Block 8, Sec- 
tion E, Cape Henry, MO 71st Street. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

8. A. W. Vaeth, Jr. requests a variance of 39.1 feet to a 

10.9 foot front yard setback instead of 30 feet as 
•required (2nd story addition) the western 108 feet of 
Lot 220, North Linkhom Park Extended, 1112 Rose 
Lane. Lynnhaven Borough. 

9. Swanberg Corporation requests a variance to aUow 
parking in the required 10 foot setbacks from both 9th 
Street and MediterraiKan Avenue where prohibited and 
to wuve the required hmdscaping in the setbacks where 
required on Lots 1, 3, 3, ^d 7, Block 38. ShadowUwn 
Heights, Northwest con^ of Mediternuean and 9th 
Street. Virginia Bau:h Borough. 

10. Mast Brothers, Inc requesU a variance of .30 feet to 
a 9.30 foot side yard setback instead of 10 feet as 
required (north side) on Lot 29. Block B, Phase 2, 
Chatham Hall, 1103 Mecklen Lane. Kempsville 
Borough. 

11. Qvawt Ho-bot Ferrell requesU a variance of 13 
parking spaces to "0" parking spaces instead of 13 
parking spaces as required (medial cUnic) on Lots 16 
and 18, Block 52, Virginia Beach Development Com- 
pany, 206 23rd Street, Virginia Beach Borough. 

12. Seashore Management, Ltd. and Burlage Cor- 
poration requests a variance to aUow 1 14 fwrldi^ spaces 
to be 7.3 fe^ in width by 18.3 feet in leiqtth instead of 9 
feet in width by 20 feet in length as required and to 
aUow 20 foot wi(te aisles instead of 22 feet in width as 
required for parking at a 90 c^ree angte (279 parking 
spKX lot) on Lou 11 thr(Mi^ 22, Block 9, Virpnia 
Beach Development Corporation, 801 Attentic Avoiue. 
Vfa^nia Beach B(vou^. 

13. J. Cauistie Itevraport reqt»sU a variance of 4.4 feet 
to a 13.6 foot frcmt yard sAteck (Ocean View Av«im) 
iMtaad of 20 fe^ as reipsired and of 3 feet to a 3 foot 
^de ^d aetbadc (wert sUe) instead of 8 fe« tt required 
(&d st(»y adcfition) on L(^ 9 and 10, Block 17, 
Chesapeake Park, 4824 Bay Bridge Lue. Baysiite 
BwiM^. 



Public Hearing 



14. Runnington Investment Corporation requests a 
variance of 2 feet to a 6 foot side yard setback (south 
side) instead of 8 feet as required (fireplace) on Lot C, 
Block 24, Thalia Acres, Palm Avenue. KempsviUe 
Borough. 

13. Runnington Investment Corporation requests a 
variance of 2 feet to a 6 foot side yard setback (north 
side) instead of 8 feet as required (fireplace) on Lot D. 
Block 24, HuUia Acres. Palm Avenue. Kempsville 
Borough. 

16. Runnington Investmoit Corporation r^uests a 
variance of 2 feet to a 6 foot side yard setback (south 
side) instead of 8 feet as required (fireplace) on Lot E, 
Block, 24, ThaUa Acres, Palm Avenue. KempsviUe 
Borough. 

17. Runnington Investment Corporation requests a 
variance of 2 feet to a 6 foot side yard setback (north 
side) instead of 8 feet as required (fireplace) on Lot F, 
Block 24, ThaUa Acres, Pahn Avenue. KempsviUe 
Borough. 

18. Runnington Investmoit Corporation requests a 
variance of 2 feet to a 6 foot side yard setback (north 
side) instead of 8 feet as requirnl (fireplace) on Lot 20. 
Block 7, ThaUa Acres. S. Palm Avenue. KonpsviUe 
Borough. 

19. Runnington Investmoit Corporation requests a 
variance of 2 feet to a 6 foot side yard setback (south 
side) instead of 8 feet as r«)uired (rirq>lace on Lot 21, 
Block 7. ThaUa Acres, S. Pahn Avenue. KempsviUe 
Borough. 

DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1. John W. KeUam requests a variance of 19,300 square 
feet of land area to 10,500 square feet to land area in- 
stead of 30,000 square fMt of land area as required and 
of 123 feet of lot width to 73 feet in width instead of 20 
feet of lot width as required for a multiple-family 
development on Lot 16 and Eastern half of lot 18, Block 
38, Virginia Beach Development Corporation, 316 20th 
Street. Virginia Beach Bormigh. 

2. McDonald's Corporation requests a variance of 5 f^t 
to a "0" setback from tlw out jM'<^)erty Une (Board- 
walk) instead of 3 feet as required (patio cover) on Lots 
1, 2 aiKi SouthCTn half of Lot 3, Block 69. Virginia 
Be»:h Dev^^moit Compuiy, 2W3 Atlantk Avenue. 
Virginia Beach Bormi^; 

3. R. H. Yates, Jr. requests a variaiKe of 2 parking 
sp^es to "0" parking spaces instoui of 2 parking 
spMCS as re(|uired for a 2 unit »Mition on the Eastern 
m f<«t of Lot 4, Block 60, Virginia Beach Devdofmient 
Com|»ny. 302 24th Street. Virpnia Beach Bormigh. 

4. M. M. Newton requests a variant* of 2 fwt to a 6 
foot side yard setback (north side) instead of 8 feet as 
required (decks) on Lot 6. Block 34. Pelican Dunes, 
3957 and 3959 W. Stratford l^eet. Bayside Borough. 



^■VPWi 



' . ' ^ *'^^^^^^^^^^^m^^^^mmmmmmmmmmm999fi99mm9mtmmmgmmmmm&aammKmmmmmm 



14 Virginia B«ich Sun, February 2, 1983 



Virginia Beach Public Notices 



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nMk Nflariiif 



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J 



5. M. M. Newton reqi»sts a variasix of 2 feet to a 6 
foot side yard setback (south side) instead of 8 feet as 
required (decks) on Lot 5, Block S4, Pelican Dunes, 
39S3 and 39SS W. Stratfrnd Street. Bayside Borough. 

6. Elias and NikolaM^eodoridis requests a variance of 
^ 7 feet to a "0" setback for a free-standing sign instead 
1 of 7 feet as required on Lots 1, 2, 6, 7 and Eastern 100 
I feet of a 20 foot lane, Block 76. Virginia Beach 

Development Company, 3208 Atlantic Avenue. Virginia 
:' Beach Borough. 

; ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 
i BOARD. 
i G. L. IsdeU 
I Secretary 
; 185-1 2T 2/ 9 VB 



f NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

; Viiginia: 

' The regular meeting of the City Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia on Monday, February 
14, 1983, at 2:00 p.m. at which time the following ap- 
plications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION: 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordinance upon Application of Mr. and Mrs. 
Allen M. Holmes, Fred and Elizabeth Soles, George B. 
and Edith K. Shields and Michael Wilcox for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-7 Residential District to A- 
4 Apartment District on property located on the South- 
east corner of 24th Street and Mediterranean Avenue on 
Lots 18, 20, 22, 24, 26. 28. 30, and 32, Block 58, Map 
No. 6, Part of Property of Virginia Beach Development 
Co. Said parcel contains 32.500 square feet. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of Ruby Anne Dunn 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A-1 Apartment District to B- 
4 Resort-Commercial District on certain property 
located on the South side of 34th Street beginning at a 
point 150 feet West of Pacific Avenue, running a 

; distance of 100 feet along the South side of 34th Street, 
i running a distance of 140 feet along the Western proper- 
' ty line, running a distance of 100 feet along the 
Southern property line and running a distance of 140 
feet along the Eastern property line. Said parcel con- 
tains 14,000 square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

3. An Ordinance upon Application of Tony Annarino 
Jr., Inct for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A-1 Apartment District to B- 

, 2 Community-Business District on property located on 
\ the Southeast comer of Bonney Road and S. Kentucky 
'' Avenue on Lots 1 thru 6, Block 1, Midway. Said parcel 

contains 18,300 squarq f««UvJ(£<l4mVJLLE 

BOROUGH. 

LYfWfifAVteN UbmXjfCH: 

4. An Ordinance upon Application of Kayo Oil Com- 
pany for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-8 Residential District to B- 
2 Community-Business District on certain property 
located on the South side of Virginia Beach Boulevard 
beginning at a point 139 feet more or less West of Sykes 

j Avenue, running a distance of I40 feet more or less 
; along the South side of Virginia Beach Boulevard, run- 
i ning a distance of 150 feet along the Western property 
\ line, running a distance of 140 feet along the Southern 
I property line and running a distance of 150 feet along 
i the Eastern property line. Said parcel contains 21,000 
i square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
: CONDITIONAL USE PERMITS: 
' LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

5. An OrdinauM upon Application of Kayo Oil Com- 
pany for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a self- 
service automobile sovice station on certain property 
located on the Southwest comer of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and Sykes Avenue, mnning a distance of 279 
feet along the South side of Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
running a distance of ISO feet along the Western proper- 
ty Une, running a distance of 279 feet along the 
Southern property line and running a distance of ISO 
feet along the West side of Sykes Avenue. Said parcel 
contains 41,850 square feet. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

6. An OrdinauM upon Application of Colonial-Laskin 
Associates, a Virginia Limited Partnership, for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for recreational 
facilities of an outdoor nature (family amusement park) 
and an arcade building on certain property located on 
the West side of First Colonial Road beginning at a 
point 750 feet more or less South of Laskin Road, run- 
ning a distance of 300 feet more or less along the West 
side of First Colonial Road, running a distance of 
664.19 feet in a Westerly direction, running a distance 
of 655.02 feet in aSodAierly direction, running a distan- 
ce of 1154.37 feet along the Southern property line, 
running a distance of 1311.33 feet along the Western 
property line, running a distance of 410.08 feet in an 
Easterly direction, running a distance of 266.50 feet in a 
Southerly direction and running a distance of 1400 feet 
more or less in an Easterly direction. Said parcel con- 
tains 30 acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon Application of Robol P. Brett, 
Jr.. and Clarence J. SmiUi, III, for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a duplex on tht North side of Pine- 
wood Drive, 69 feet West of Mediterranean Avenue on 
Lou 13 and 15, Block 7, Pinewood. Said parcel contains 
5,795 square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

I PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 
i 8. An Ordinance upon Application of Linda T. Chap- 
^ pell for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a single 
family dwelling in Uie AG-I Agricultural District on cer- 
; tain property located 600 feet South of London Bridge 
: Road be^nning at a point 2000 feet more or less East of 
i Shipps Corner Ro«i, running a distance of 1750 feet 
more or less along the Northoi! pr(^}erty line, running a 
disCance of 750 f^ in a Southwly direction, running a 
distance of 2980 feet m<»e or less in a SouUieasterly 
dir«nidn, running a distance of 300 feet in a South- 
westerly direction, running a distance of 4001 .32 feet in 
a Northw»terly dirKtion aiMl running a distam^ of 
1717 feet more or ku atoig tht Western prc^rty line. 
Said parcel is locate at 1549 Lcrnkm Brid^ Rend and 



contains 152.8 acres more or less. PRINCESS ANNE 

BOROUGH. 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATIONS: 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

9. An Ordinance upon Application of Terry Cor- 
poration of Virginia and Timberlake Associates for a 
modification to the Land Use Plan of Timberlake to in- 
clude apartment sites on 11.5 acres located on the East 
side of Independence Boulevard, 1400 feet more or less 
North of South Plaza Trail. Plats with more detailed in- 
formation are available in the Department of Planning. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMITS: 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

10. An Ordinance upon Application of the Trustees and 
Official Board of Suburban Christian Church for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a church witii ad- 
ditions and related facilities on the Northwest and 
Southwest corners of Meighan Drive and Bellamy 
Manor Drive on Parcel A and Lots 16, 17, 18 and 19. 
Section D-1, Bellamy Manor. Said parcels contain 2.867 
acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

1 1 . An Ordinance upon Application of Anne Hile for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for boarding horses on 
property located on the West side of Rusbuldt Lane, 7(X> 
feet Southwest of Salem Road on Lots 12-A thru 20. 
Salem Acres. Said parcel is located at 2233 Salem Road 
and contains 10.15 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

12. An Ordinance upon Application of Charles Vemon 
Craig and Christie Gilluly Craig for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a home occupation (operation of 
Mother's Helper, Inc.. a licensed family day care 
referral system) on the East side of Allman Court. 
South of Albright Drive on Lot 32, Block G. Brandon, 
Section One. Said parcel is located at 1660 Allman 
Court and contains 17,084.33 square feet. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed information are available in the 

Department of Planning. 

All interested persons are invi 

Ru'h Hodges Smith 

Cit "lerk 

181 '»T2/2VB 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Planning Commission will hold a 
Public Hearing On Tuesday. February 8. 1983, at 12:00 
Noon in the Council Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Princess Anne Courthouse, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. A briefing session will be held at 9:30 a.m. in 
the Planning Department Conference Room, 
Operations Building. PLANNING COMMISSION 
ACTION IS NOT A FINAL DETERMINATION OF 
THE APPLICATION, BUT ONLY A RECOMMEN- 
DATION TO THE CITY COUNCIL AS THE VIEW- 
POINT OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION. FINAL 
DETERMINATION OF THE APPLICATION IS TO 
BE MADE BY CITY COUNCIL AT A LATER DATE, 
AFTER PUBLIC NOTICE IN A NEWSPAPER 
HAVING GENERAL CIRCULATION WITHIN THE 
CITY. The following applicaions will appear on the 
agenda: 

DEFERRED BY PLANNING COMMISSION FOR 60 
DAYS ON DECEMBER 14, 1982: 

1. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordin- 
ance. Subdivision for John H. and Thomas F. Gray. 
Said property is located on the East side of Knotts 
Island Road. 311.06 feet North of the Vir^nia-North 
Carolina State line. Plats witit more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the Department of Planning. 
PUNGO BOROUGH. 

2. An ordinance upon Application of Runnington In- 
vestment Corp. for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from I-i Ligjit In- 
dustrial District to B-4 Resort Commercial DisUict on 
the South side of Pinewood Drive. 100 feet West of 
Mediterranean Avenue. Said parcel is located on Lots 
17 and 18. Block 8. nnewood. and contains 6381 square 
feet. VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Application of John H. and 
Thomas F. Gray for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for 2 single family homes in the AG-1 Agricultural 
District on lots located on the East side of Knotts Island 
Road beginning at a point 311.06 feet North of the 
Virginia-North Carolina State line, running a distance 
of 15.64 feet along the East side of Knotts Island Road, 
running a distance of 451.69 feet in an Easterly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 472.94 feet in a Northerly 
direction, ruiming a distant of 570.64 feet in a 
Westerly direction, running a distance of 15.62 feet 
along the East »de of Knotts Island Road, running a 
distance of 1388.40 feet along the Northern propoly 
line, running a distance of 520.82 feet along the Eastern 
property line and running a distance of 1281.70 feet 
along the Southvn propoty line. Said parcek contains 
13.5 acres. PUNGO BOROUGH. 

DEFERRED BY PLANNING COMMISSION FOR 30 
DAYS ON JANUARY 1 1 , 1983: 

4. Application of Virginia Beach Resort Conference 
Hotel, a Virginia General Partnership, for the discon- 
tinuance, closure and abandonment of a portion of 
Shore Drive begiiming on the Northern ude of Shore 
Drive, 209.77 feet West of Croix Drive and running in a 
W«terly direction a distance of 218.10 feet. Said parcel 
is 15 feet in width and contains 3271.5 square feet. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

5. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Offioos in 
regard to certain elonents of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Stuart Held. Property located on the 
Northwest comn^ of Atlantic Avenue and 18th Strett. 
Plats with more detailed information are available in the 
Department of Planning. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

6. Appeal from D«nsi<Hi of Administntive Officers in 
regard to certain elonoits of the Subdivison Ordinance, 
Subdivision for Runnington Investment Corpcvation. 
Property located on the West si(te of West Lane, 886.87 
feet North of Virginia Beach BtMikvard. Plats with 
more detailed information an available in the Depu- 
tment of Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

7. Appod from E>ecisi(ms of AdmiAistrative Offiom in 
regard to certain elemeatt of the &ib(UvisioQ Ordinan- 



ce, Subdivison for Lillian B. Johnson. Prop^ty located 
on tile East side of Avalon Avoiue, 250 feet more ot less 
South of Lancd<H Drive. Plato widi more detailnl in- 
formation are available in the DqNutmoit of Piaimlng. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION: 



8. An Ordinance upon Application of Dimensions, Inc.. 

for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to A* 
1 y^Mutment District on certain property located on the 
South side of Baxter Road begimiing at a point 1530 feet 
East of Princess Anne Rcmd, running a distance of 250 
feet along the South side of Baxter Road, running a 
distance of 935.30 feet along the Easto-n property line, 
running a distance of 181.80 feet along the Southern 
property line and running a distance of ^3.30 feet 
along the Western property line. Said parcel contains 
4.97 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

9. An Ordinance upon Application of Tidewater Impor- 
te. Inc., for a CHANGE OF ZONING. DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from 1 Office District to B-2 
Community Business Disu< i on certain property 
located at the Northern extremity of Cranston Lane, 
running a distance of 250.58 feet along the Southvn 
I»-operty line, running a distance of 338.36 feet along 
the Weston property line, running a distance of 70 feet 
in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 
161.76 feet in a Southerly direction, running around a 
curve in a Southeasterly direction a distance of 241.14 
feet and mnning a distance of 12.86 feet In a Southerly 
direction. Said parcel contains 30,579 square feet. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

10. An Ordinance upon Application of Nelson P. Tib- 
bitt. Jr., for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Community-Business 
District to A-2 Apartment District on certain propoty 
located at the Northwest intersection of Oconee Avoiue 
and Byrd Lane, mnning a distance of 220 feet more or 
less along the North side of Oconee Avenue, mnning a 
distance of 430 feet along the Western property line, 
running a distance of 480 feet more or less along the 
Northern property line, mnning a distance of 330 feet 
more or less along the Eastern property line and running 
a distance of 200 feet more or less In a Southwesterly 
direction. Said parcel contains 4 acres mwe or less. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

11. An Ordinance upon Application of Nelson P. Tib- 
bitt, Jr., for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 Residential District to A- 
2 Apartment District on certain property located at the 
Southeast comer of Pembroke Boulevard and Witch- 
duck Road, running a distance of 715 feet along the 
East side of Witchduck Road, mnning a distance of 100 
feet in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 
262.08 feet In a Northeasterly direction, mnning a 
distance of 169.8 feet in an Easterly direction, mnning a 
distance of 237.5 feet in a Northeasterly direction, run- 
i^ a distance of 40.12 feet in an Easterly din;ctiQq« 
ntniMng a distance of 138 feet in a Northeasterly cUrec- 
tion, mnning a distance of 101.70 feet in a Westerly 
direction, mnning a distance of 44 feet in a North- 
westerly direction, mnning a distance of 39 feet In a 
Northeastnly direction, running a distance of 65.90 feet 
In a Northwesterly direction, mnning a distance of 
84.80 feet In a Northeasterly direction and running a 
distance of 236.94 feet in a Northwesterly direction. 
Said panxl contains 7 acres more or less. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

12. An Ordinance upon Application of Alloi J. Oettel, 
Parliament Building and Roger W. Gray for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Community-Business 
District to I-l Light Industrial District on certain 
property located at the Northeast intersection of Prin- 
cess Anne Road and Parllammt Drive, mnning a 
distance of 757 feet more or less along the North side of 
I^Uamoit Drive, running a distance of 181.82 feet 
aloQg the Eastern property line, mnning a distance of 
750 feet more or less along the Northern property line 
and running a distnce of 204.92 feet along the Western 
property line. Said pared contains 3.193 acres. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

13. An Ordinance upon Application of Mrs. G. J. 
Oultouison and Mrs. Nancy Vest for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from R-5 
Residential District to 0-1 Office Distiict on certain 
property located on the North side of Providence Road 
banning at a point 260 feet more or less East of Indian 
River Road, mnning a distance of 600 feet along the 
Nwth side of Providence Road, mnning a distawx of 
^0 feet along the Eastern property Une, runmng a 
distance of 740 feet along the Nortl^rn propoty Une, 
running a distance of 40 feet in a Southo-ly direction, 
running a distance of 145 feet in an Easterly direction 
and ruiming a distance o( 210 feet in a Southerly direc- 
tion. Said parcel contains 4.41 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

14. An Ordinance upon ^plication of Dominion 
BuUding Corporation for a modification to the Land 
Use Plan of Timberlake to include a ccmuMrcial site of 
l.OSQ acres lo(»ted at the Southwest comer of Indepoi- 
tewe Boulevard and Foxwood Drive. Plato with mwe 
detailed information are available in the Dqpartmoit of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

15. An Ordlnaiure upon Ai^lication of R. G. Moon for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSinCATION from R-5 Residoitial District to R- 
6 Residential District on certain propoty located oa the 
West side of Salon Road b^lnnlng at a point 1640 feet 
North of Elbow RMd, runnmg a distance of 379.97 feet 
along the West side of Salem Road, mnning a distance 
of 3^8 feet along tiie NOTthera pr<^>CTty line, running a 
distaiKe of 1112.80 fe^ along die Western iH-cq«ty 
lim, mnning a distance of 2347.58 feet alcmg tte 
Southern propoty line, mnning a distance of 554.75 
feet in a Northerly direction and running a diiMnce of 
703.29 feet in an Eastoly direction. Said pared contains 
66.2 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

16. An (^dlnaiux upon Application of R. G. Mo<»e ttx 
a "GHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION fn»n R-6 Re^lential IMstrkt to O- 
1 Offke EHstrict on c»tain property located on the 
Smith wle of Bcmney Road bc^nnlng at a point 600 feet 
mmv ot less East of WItehduck Road, mnning a (Usan- 
ce of 195.3 fttn al(»ig the Sonth skle of Bonney Road. 



rumilng a ^staaoe et 419.5 feet akmg the Eastern 
ptopaty Une, numfaig a diMaii:e of 186.9 feet along tiie 
Southern proper^ Une and runaing a distance of 514.9 
feet along the Western ptppaty Une. Said parcel con- 
tains 2.1 1 wra. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

17. An Ordinance upon i^nrticatimi of ERA Amhold A 
Company, Inc., for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from R-8 Residential 
District to R-9 Residential-Townhouse District on 
ptoperty located at Uie Nwtlnmt comer of Princ«s 
Anne Road and BriUngham Road, running a distance of 
131 .54 feet ato^ the North side of Princess Anne Road, 
running a distance of 136.41 feet along tiie Western 
property Une. ninidng a distance of 124.96 feet along 
die Nwdmn propoty Une and running a distance of 
115.98 feet akmg the West side of BeUingham Road. 
Said pared contains 16.988 square feet. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. , _. ^ 

18. An Ordinamx uptm AppUcation of Oarlaiui E. 
Bennett. Jr.. and David M. and NeUie J. CaUahan for a 
CHANGE OF ZONJNG DISTRICT 
CLASSIHCATION from R-6 Residoitial District to B- 
2 Community-Budness Distrkt on the South side of 
Haygood Road on Lot 30, Block 42. Section Nine, Part 
Two, Aragona Village. &dd pared is located at 4909 
Haygood Road and contains 8575 square feet. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

19. An Ordlnuice upon A^q^cation of Sea Pines 
Assodates for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
temporary parking lot on certain property located at the 
Soudiwcst comer of Atlantk Avenue and 34di Street, 
running a distomce of 210 feet along die West side of 
Atlantic Avenue, runiring a distance of 130 feet in a 
Westo-ly direction, runnbg a distance of 90 feet in a 
Soudierly dlrectim, running a distance of 100 feet along 
tiie Nordi side of 33rd Stireet, runiting a distance of 300 
feet along dw East side of I^wific Avenue and mnning a 
distance of 230 feet along die South side of 34th Stireet. 
Said pared contains 1.31 acres. VIRGINL\ BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

20. An Ordinance upoa ^ppUcation of Fred H. FeUer 
for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for recreational 
faculties of an outdoor nature (fishing) on certain 
property located on die Soudieast portion of Lot B-20 
as shown on tiie plat entitied "Re-Plat of Rudee 
Hdghto, PrinoesI Anne County, Virginia", dated 
December, 1930, and which is located on die East side 
of Southside Road. Plato widi more detailed infor- 
mation are avaOaUe in die Department of Planning. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

21 . An Ordinance up<m AppUcation of John C. Aspin^ 
waU for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for mini- 
warehouses on certain projptxty located on the South 
side of Shore Drive bqinning at a point 600 feet more 
or less West of Indqiendence Boulevard, running a 
dlstuce of 160.24 feet idong die South side of Shore 
Drive, running a distance of 331.63 feet along the 
We^era property Une, running a distancrof 40 feet in a 
SoudiwcsteflyidinctiMt ffunmor a distance of 25 feet in 
a Soudieastwiy ^lUraction,; running a distance of 410 feet 
in a Northeasterly directi<m, running a distance of 413 
feet in a Soutlmstaly direction, mnning a distance of 
280.06 feet in a Northerly directi<m, running a distance 
of 137.09 feet in a Westerly direction, mnning a distan- 
ce of 117.34 feet in a Souttoly direction, mnning a 
distance of 333 feet in a Westnrly direction and mnmng 
a distance of 260 feet in a Nordierly direction. Said par- 
ed contains 4.4 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

22. An Ordinance upon >^Ucation of George Tony 
Smldi for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a single 
family dweUing In the AG-I Agricultural District on cer- 
tdn pt«verty loaUed 600 fed South of Sandbridge 
Road b^liuung at a point 600 fed East of New Bridge 
RMd, running a (Ustance of 730 fed more or less along 
die Northern property Une, running a distance of 100 
fed mort or less along the Eastern property Um, run- 
ning a distance of 960 feet more or less along the 
Sottthom propCTty Une and running a distance of 370 
fed more of kss along die Weston propoty Une. Said 
pared contains 8.4 acres mwe or kss. PRINCESS AN- 
NE BOROUGH. 

23. An (Minance iqwn AiqiUcation of Gene S. Meeklns 
T/A Jaraco, for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for ^ 
an auto parts store and muffler Aop on cotain propoty 
located on the Soudi sick of Laskin Road beginning at a 
pdint 230 fed more or less West of VUlage Drive, mn- 
ning a distance of 130 fed idong dw South side of 
Laskin Road, mnning a didance of 230 fed along die 
Weston ixroperty Um, running a distance of 130 fed 
along die Southern property Hm ud running a distance 
of 250 fed along die Eastmi pnqierty Une. Said pared 
is located at 1837 Laskin Road and conUuns 32,500 
square fed. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

STREET CLC^URE: 

24. Anilkation of Bay front Assodates, Ltd., for the 
disctrntinuanoe, doeure and abandmiment of a portion 
of Shore Drive be^nniag at a p(^t 662.87 fed West of 
Beech Stred and ninaliv a Westerly direction a distance 
(rf 436.4 fed. Said pared is 10 fed in widdi and contains 
4364 ^uare feet LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

23. An^ciUicm of Claud P. Browntey, III, d al, for die 
dlscontinuuce, ctosure and abandonment of a 13 foot 
altey located between Adantic Avenue and Myrtle 
Avoiue and bounded (m die Noith by Loto 95 ami 96, 
and on the Soudi by Loto 76 and 77, Plat of die HoOks. 
Saki aUey runs a didance of 80 fed and contains 1200 
square fed.XYNNHAVB4 BOROUGH. 

26. Andicatira (tf Ttooias C. ^ibot, Jr., and Ju» K. 
Shubert for die discomimianoe, donire and abandcm- 
moit of a por^tm (rf Lnxlerdalc Avenue b^lnning ati> 
die WestCTn bouMtoy <^ Vdzy Avoiue aiKl runnfav in a 
Westoly dirediraatov die Sottttem boundary of Ix^ 
17, 18. 19. and 20, Blodc 16, Chesapeake Park. Said 
parcel contains 6764.2 square feet. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

AMB4DMENT: 

27. Motion of the Planning Coounlsdcm of tlw Oty of 
vir^niy Bead, yb^^t, u> uoad mi recM^laln Sec- 
ticMi 4,2(iO of ^ SaJb^ivMon C^#Dnoe pcrtainl^ to 
^sonoito. M«e ddttled lnf(»nii^<m H availaUe m dM 

D^artment of Plapg?^ . 

I^s iritk note d^dM iaf wmatkm ue avaUdik in the 

DqittttMSt irf PteiHifaig, 

Att intseded poK»s «« invited to attend. 

Robert J. Scott 

IIMyr2/2VB 



■■ 



MHVWIiRWV 



^^^^ 



■ r. ■ i w i m-^ II II t i 



"X 



547-4571 



Virginit Beach Sun, February 2. 1981 M 






4. Hates 



XMAS BILLS 

Or Aiy PwiMw Iwl^ LAM 

Vb^i*i-N«ttCMiiM 

OrMHQrOttMrMita 

WITHmODGlEIMT 
UP TO IM^ OF VALUE 

BSilN ANCE AMMnCACas 

ta MMH CMM hrtnwt ■ hnr M 
12% 

W.«M.llMtMMipt.Mni. 

BAD CREDIT 

UPTOM^OTVALVE 
GUARANTHa) AlWBOVAL 

WllhnffidMtav«y 

STOP roRECLOSUBES 

PAY KSJUDGEMENTS 

TURNED DOWN 

BY Oni|]»7 dONTOVEVP 
We Harc Private iMtion 

COMMERCIAL 

Property Loum AIn AvrihUc 

ALSO WILL Mnr 

MORTGAGE NOinS 

OPEN TILL SPM 

SAT. 10 TILL 2 PM 

CAPITAL ASSOOATES 

49»-UM.4IMan 



ATTENTION MK/WBE • W« 
are seekii« bidt for HBB fim*. 
On the foUowtag VDH and T 
project to be Ud on February 23, 
1983. J(A deiignatkm nimbcr it 
11-83, South Hampton County - 
interutcd fimu should contact J. 
H. Lee and Sons Incmporated, 
P, O. Box 86. Courtluid. VA 
23837. 804-S62-5181. 

1 1T^2 

INCOME TAX • and Accoum- 
ing (includint tax tfudiu). Mario 
VendJtti, former Revonie Aient, 
'•''07 Virginia Beach Blvd. (near 
Rosemont Rd.) Call 463-6606. 

ITTN 

: JUNK CAKS AND TIUCXS • 

; Towed free. Some bouglit. CM 
485-1961 or 485-5859. 
ITFN 



MnCK- IfTf, Lctatee LTD, air 
cobiUmi, powCT iteming and 
haku, tot whcd, CB. wa/tm 
«ter«io„ CMtom interior, 
BwigaMJy, ctectrk^ wiadom, 
73,000 nrilo. S49M. CaO SI7- 
4895. 

ffT-y? 

AVfTlN IIAID4A . GT, 1974, 
vary good cowtttiaD, D^ faMpec- 
Hon. AMmA itcrfo, SI400. Call 
463-0618. 

" 44T2-16 

CMEVEIW • 1912 4 door. 4. 
ipeed. litvir, ak, ipottt nkron, 
6 raomhi cid. S300 dmm. take 
over $207.34 a ouiDth or rdinas- 
ce. Must Ma.CaB 440-1301. 
iiHL^ 

flVS. CAU. TIUCXS under 

SlOO available at kxal fovcm- 

meot sales in your area. Cnll 

(r^^mdabk) l-619-569^n41 cxt. 

8152 fOT your 1983 directory. 24 

houn. 

44TM6 

BLAZEK • 1977, big tires, 
AM/FM. CB radio combinaticm, 
4 wheel drive, burgandy and 
white. Owner win assist widi 
financiog. Call 425-0909. 
.4ITM6 

COEmOlXt ■ mo, atatloa, 
4 door, 6 cylinder, 4 speed, air, 
power steoing and brakes. Wdl 
maintained. CaO 463-0301. 

-=r— 4-fT-a/y 

PLYMOUTH . 1981 Cbmmp, 
fantattic gas ayieate. AM/FM, 
ffliat oondiUoii, beat offer. CaU 
623-6634. 

41T2-2 

VOUSWAGON ■ 1975 Bx- 
oeikot runaing oonditiiDii, 52,000 
miles, iMcat Viigiala in^ecticm. 
$2J0O. Can 467-3093. 

^ 41TM 

FOBD . 1968 Mustang, fastback. 
Mot«, transmission, and rear 
end is good shapes. Body needs 
rtpdr. S800 ncgotiaUe^Can 58^ 
2540. 

. 44T^23 



. CBHHT nH^l^iS-RMxive 

, teed^bad.crt^tjiqpiobleni.J'w, .„«,:-siiu*t*it*^ ^l. 
free bFothirfr till HomHt ' Ji««SM«»«»-'^^' 



TMANS iOi - 1976, Hack, 
upo«WtqRMNH|ii^MI|w»rak4. 



Qdit, toU 
anytime. 



free l-80(M4M331 
18T2.9 

THE BALLOOONEKY 

. Balloon BouqueU delivered in 
the Tidewater area. 583-8280, 9 
am til 5 pm, Monday thru 
Friday. 

— ^;: HT-yy 

, CIEOIT PI0BLEMS7 • 

Receive a Mastercvd ot Visa, 
Guarantee^, even if ycNi have 
' bad credit or have been 
bankrupt. For bee broduue, 
send self addressed staovcd en- 
velope to House of Credit. Box 
280570, Dallas, Texas. 75228 or 
caU 214-324-5944 anytime. 
MhMS 

\ NEXD28peiylewfaowoukllike 
' to lose 7 to 15 pounds the 1st 

week and 5 to 7 pmmds per week 

thereafter. Only th sertous need 

to apply. CaU 487-9605. 

14T^23 

THE LOCK 8HW And lU^t • 
I 2981 South Military H^wiy, 

Chesapeake. Va., 485-1950. 

Cmnpiete 24 hour locksmith ler- 

vke. 

14T^23 



<41Tt2 



DODGE • 1975, Charger, 
automatic, power steering and 
brakes. ^. Musi see. Sl,250. 
CallY53-20S3. 

44T^23 

CAPKI • 1974, 4 cylinder. 4 
«eed, new radials, AM/FM, 
new paint. Looks and nms real 
good. $l«5.Qdl 421-2289. 

41T^2 

OMiVnTI - 1982. white with 
red interior, onokcd glass top*, 
flidly equ^iped. AD avirilaUe op- 
ticms. Can 463-5637. 

44T2-a 



7. 



■ CREDIT PROILEMSr - 

'. Recdve a MastercanI or Visa 
' Ouarani^, evoi if you have 

■ bad oedit. No avdit or have 
- been bankrupt. For fre^ 
, brochure, sod Klf stamped en- 

vdope to House (^ Qtdit, Box 
280370, Ddlas, Tx. 572^ or aril 
214-324-5944. . 

: Hfyy 

ORIENTAL GIRtS seek, 

• Amoican moi for ftkndf^, 
mairiage. IwUvkhial introduc- 

. tioas. Information, photos $2. 
Equator, Box 57031 1-AI5. 
Miami, FLA. 331$7. 

HT-yy 

. CREDIT PR(»LEMS7 

; Receii« « Martenaid or Visa. 

Guaranteed, B«l Credit No 
Il^oblem. For ftee tvod^v aril 
' House of Qeat, 1(A ftee 1-80O- 

442-1531 anytime. 

28T^2 

RECEIVE A MASIESCAnP)- 

OR ^ta. Q Mraat eed , aobo^ 
r^sed; tac ftee toxiuse cd' 
House of Oedit, tiM titt 14Qd- 
'4«.i5}rmiyte». 
_- 2JHt 



y^KABA • 1911. 650CC ex- 
cdknt cmiditkm. low mileage, 
runs real good, kwks gnat, must 
see to appreciate. $1,600. Cftll 
461-0963. 

HDi» 

.90NDA - 1979 OL 1000 • Btacfc 
with §oU trho. Coiqilete toiff 
kit. AM/FM cassette tape 
iriayer. Cndse ooatraL Qange 
kcfit. 1I.50O Dtfte. S,500. CaD 
5«7-t«l3tlltrSpjB. 

7TPN 

YA»MHA • 1978, Y230. dfat 
byte, amBtat oeattioii. Mmv 
eidias. S33& GdS«7-4l74. 

71Ta-2 

mWDA- 1979, OMOOT, 8,000 
Iwpt. cxfidlat 



ri«ag airft, seld aeer for tl9» 

ai^i SUM or beat olhr. CaO 

424-3»7. 

72T2-9 



MiM^ WmM! 



D 



MANinPiUTVUS 

GMilo skw ta Aair iwiBe.t3Bly 
iBteMoHs need «ii4r, GMI 943- 
0730. 
IftfU:? 



tmM maZLY paychecks 

^MfOwmleaiO wnUag in 
thc«oatfort and sec»i|r of row 
own home, No eipcitooe. AD 
areas. Ptfducki fti^ fwrnui- 
teed. CoBvidi details hi4 «>- 
taaOm farm seas on 
Send a •sif^dAnsMtf. 
iB^^iepe^^ tK AH Wa 2613, 
aiihilaiiiMir|,VAa40g. 
W3T2^ 

iJ»AL 



4.telaa 



A« Alt Itifi Dal^. Cril 
5545. 

i»<ra-i6 



10. Ha|p WgRtaa 



ILPMHiMnWiiiM 



■<JS5'fjW^JWV8P^Mi»ing 
^mk.^wi expedenced.. Ca! 

IITFN 



ENERGETIC WOMAN looking 

for full or part time house 

cleaning. Call after 5 at 425- 

6173. 

112T2-2 



13.Hlg 



STOP LIVING JN FEAR-{ 
Con^dete Dog Training 3 num- 
ths to 3 years. Licensed from 
largest K-9 Corp. in the naticm., 
CUI 481-6999. 
»?-TFN 



Ydlow Nape McCaw, 

' S^, Mated pair grey cockatieb, 

StO, Mynah, SI50. All for S450. 

CaU 399-3830. 

13 1T^2 

<^aiAN SmVARD Pup- 
fries • AKC registered, for pet 
or dww. $150 and^. 
COUNTRY S<>UIRE 
8HEPAR06. CaU488-«08S. 

.13-TFN 
NANDAY CONOU* • Part 
hand tuned, young bird. Can bft 
taught to talk, cage included. 
Moving must sell. S73. Call afttf 
6,497-6280. 

13TfN 
OAMESI UTTRNS - Red 
Point, roistered; champion 
iind. ihow qtfU^, $aoo. 481- 

nsg 

13TFl!r 

GOLDEM RETREIVHI • For 

Stud, AKC registered, dark 
golden, 2H year dd, cfaamixon 
bkwtihie. Orake of fee or pick 
of^tter. CaU after 5, 804453- 
2031. 

— - mm 



14.UMslBek 



APPALOOSA CXnjNNG - a5 
yean old, sire: J« Flash (AAAT) 
very gosOe, good for youth. 
SI.5Q0 Btanri a Wf . Cafl Karen at 
547-46»ar 547-9971. 
l-MT-2/9 



IS. 



DOHWAnER • Neeib gnket. 
S3. GsB 420-7719. 

. ,, - 15TFN 



CAOUJyC ' WB Fleetwood 

cowMon, bhck. Wm « tat 2^ ^^ «- 

off«. Can 625-4332. 6414003 ert. 7699 

44T2-I6 . 




ICAiUdaaFarSda 



SALES^ART TIME or full 
time, excellent eamtBgi, poten- 
tial with opportunity for advan- 
cement in sales or sales 
maaagcmcM. M\m be mature, 
neat and mmt to be a success. 
For an apptrintment call BiU 
Dsraone tt «{0-3469 or 468- 
3M9. 
HMT.2/9 

PROCESS MAIL AT HOME - 
$30.00 per humbedl No ex- 
potaMe. Part or full time. Start 
iouncdiatdy. Details, send sdf- 
■ddressed, stamped envdkipe. 
Haiku Distributors, 115 
Walpalani Rd., Haiku. Hi 
96708. 

lO-TFN 

TELi?HONE SALES • Mor- 
ning hours, salary and bonuses. 
No txperittux necessary. We 
train. Crest tot itudenu and 
housewives. Call 627-1999. 
lOTFN 

UNMSCOVER WEAR Home 
Lingeic Party - As seen on P.M. 
Magazine and the Today show. 
Ladies have a party and recdve 
free lingerie or become an agent, 
unlimited earnings potential. 
Call Belinda at 487-4709 after 6 
C8U42M408. 
24T2-16 

PART TIME To Market A New 
Weight Management Program - 
Be introduced to a leading 
nutrition company. No door to 
door. Training provided. CaU 
545-5274. 
10 4T 2-16 

SALES PEOPLE - Male/Female 
Fantastic multi-level marketing 
opportunity involving the sale of 
food products, which everyone 
needs. Sfai levd overrides. Free 
detaUs. Write: Murray DaU, 
1804 Fearaig Avenue, EUzabeth 
aty,N.C. 27909. 
IMUd 



17. 



J 



KOEHLER CONTEMPORARY 

Sofa - Button tuffed, antique 
girid crudied valour fsibitc, super 
confortable, and in good con- 
dkion. $115 or best offciCaU 

424-3527. , ,^, , „jt, 

• ■ '^ 'r- - - i7CTa^ 

MAKING ROOM FOR wikH 

Sale - 4 piece Uving room suite, 
cofl'ee table and 2 end tables, 9 x 
12 avacado rug with pad. 
Etagere, dresser, painting. AU in 
good condition. Make 
reasonable offer. CaU 420-1 197. 

17 4T 2-16 

SOFA AND CHAIRS • brown 
and tan plaid, 3 cushion, sofa, 2 
dive green velveteen barrel back 
chain, $75 eadi. Black vinyl Iwr, 
S50. 2 bean bag chain, white and 
yeUowSS. CaU 420-7719. 
17TFN 

LIVING ROmi fflCT • Modem, 
goU vinyl sofa and cimir with 
chrome smoked glau tc^ coffee 
and end table. $300 or best offa. 
CaU 467-3723. 

17^T^2 

7 PIECE COUNTRY LIVING 
Room Suit - $220. Large 
dehumifU&r $40. Window air 
cooler $25. CaO 499-2425. 
I7IT^2 

3 PIECE SCHJD TEAMWOOD 

Sereo CaUnet • 85" kmg. lots of 
storage space for tapes and 
reconb. Has Sony led-to-r^ 
tape deck and Scmy receive 
SR6050, 30 watu per diannd. 2 
Smisui speaken, SP20P0. Space 
hi ca^iet fat turntable. AO for 
$800. CaU 588-581 1. 

17TFN 



It. 



ANTKHJE • MalM}gany Dining 
room ndt, table with leaf, 6 
chmn and sideboard. Needs 
reflmdring. $550. Oak sideboard 
$130. Gateleg Ubie $185. 
Mahc^any Corner cupboard, 
$250. Call 543-5085. Tiim- 
UeweedTratfngCo. 

18 IT 1-29 



W4T2-K 



wAsraa • wkMpod. 

^Hr ftpak. $12i. CaU ^ 

»I6. 

15 IT 2-2 

G. E. 3r* ELBCnOC RANC2 
iriAc, S93, 36" gs range, o^ 
pBteae, $130, 30 d^ wKreoqr 
oabott. l4cd>icfootOeM^^ 
$179. 
CM 'nvUeweed Itateg Co. 
3^3083. 
»<T1.2» I 



BIG FLEA MARKET and An- 


tique Show 


- At die HuBftoB 


CoUsous, 


Sunday February 


13di,12aoo 


eti09pA.I00^(rf 


exhibitors 


from 7 statM, 


fetiurh^a 


riana^ mflnffahirs. 




moiclA^ri 


ssk»is$1.50. (Htf 


prioe after S). For aure nfer- 


matioa can 422-9500. 




182T2-9 


ANTIQUS 


KITCHKN 


Wood/cod 


stove. Good Gae- 


HWoe. Cd dw at 347-4571 af- 


ter6caO^MCM. 




ls TTN 



>ORY coU.mcmn - 

Matues. liMrifc*. CMcntal 
aeci- 
1804 

Grariv St.. Qynn. D^ 10- 
5. 

UTTO. 



c 



lt.Heyelgt 



ATARI 2600 - with nine popular 
cartridges, l&tcdicnt condition. 
$250 cash, or individual prices 
avaUd>le.Ctf] 467-9193. 
UbfUbZ^ 

SWIMMING POOL SUM • 

$250, Qaivhiized Big T Oym set. 
$20. 3 by 3 Mack slate blade 
board. $13. CaU 420-7719. 
I6TFN 

SHOtWW WILLIAMS PAINT 

RctaOs for &2, wU sdl for $7 a 
gaUon. New Vinyl shutten 43" 
to 79'. S7 to SI3 a pair. Tumble- 
weed Tra£ag Co. 343-5015. 

16 , 4T 1-29 

ELECTRIC HOSPITAL WD- 

Complete with mittttcss. 3 level 
buttons, head, foot A hdghth of 
bed. ExcailHit condition. Orig. 
$1200. One year oU $600. Ccnn- 
mode Chair -exodknt condition 
$35.00. CaO 427-1901 Wed. thru 
Sun. 

ifcmi 

DISH WASHER - Sofa, Christ- 
mas tree, cdor TV phn more. 
CaU 423-5222. 

iilll:? 

SKI SUITE • John Claude Keely, 
dn 36, blue with black. LUk 
new. $40. CaU 547-4174. 

16IT^2 

RACING HELMET - Boys size, 
brand new. $50. CaU 547-4174. 

-. 16 1T2-2 

GUN - 32 automatic Browning, 
made by Hege of West Germany, 
colbcton item. $200. CaU 468- 
2648Bftarl. 

I61T^2 

EAR ■ Beautiful WorU Qtobe 
from Naples Italy. $450. CaU 
583^r8. 

16 IT 2-2 



1 



ODTT BIKE ■ Rapar with lots of 
extras, like new. $200. CaU 547- 
4174. 

19 IT 2-2 

MRT RACING QCYCLE - 
MCS Magnum XL, many racing 
•cccssories, ttke new. $300. CaU 
547-4174. 
I91T^2 

GIRLS BIKES - 20 indi. $13. 10 
speed $33, 3 ipeed'$23. CaU 420- 
7719. 

. 19%TFN 



ORGAN - KimbaD Swinger 600, 

good condition, $573. CaU 421- 

3832. 

_^ 204T^23 



21.TalMfiilM/StgiM 



SEARS STEREO • AM/FM, 8 

track, turn table. $50. CaU 420- 

7719. 

. 2r4TTFN 



22.J««alrjr 



LAIHES JEWELBY FCMSAU 

One ladies cocktaU ring with 45 
diamonds and is 14 «rat ydlow 
gdd. Also a 14 carat white golft 
23 jewd ladies Bulova watch. 
Ring apprataed at $3400 and 
watch appraised at $1900. WUI 
seU dtiier for half Uie appakti 
vahw. Cafl 547-0S58 after 5K» 
p.m. 22TFN 



2«.W«rit«TtliV 



<.ASH PAID • Virginia Beach 
Antique Co. pays cash for an- 
tiques, old furniture, clocks, 
glassware, lamps, china, oil pain- 
tingi,^ oriental rugs, oM iron and 
an^e toys. We buy one piece 
,«( entire JiDusefuUs. Also,) good- 
Ufqd^ /offlltw, CaU 422-4477 
^Iween 8 a.m. and 6p.m. 

■T 24TFN 

-UNK cars Wrecked or run- 
idng. cash-free towing. We also 
buy used radiaton and batteries. 
7 days a week. CaO 487-9222 or 
after 6 p.m. 340-1039. 

24TTN 

CASH • Buying furniture, an- 
tiques, jewelry, silver, gold and 
cmns. T(9 doUar Durwood Zedd 
and Co. 625-5000. 
244T2/9 



TVs AND GUNS 

cash. Black and white or eoiot. 
Portsmouth Gun and TV shop. 
CaU 393-1300. 

244T2-9 



2S.ag«4TlihifgTtEat I 

EARL SMITH OYSHERS. . 

Across from Hurd Seafood 
Restaurant. Shucked in own 
natural juices. By quarto, pinto, 
or biahds. CaU 340-3171. 

25 4T 2/9. 



21. EatsrtaiMMi^ 



ftNt SALE-TO BaUroom dance 
'essMU. CaU Larry Dunn for 
more infwimitiiHi 480-2134. 

26-TFW 



28. rlrawMfl 



FIREWOOD FOR 8AU - AU 

te-dwood. Lar^ pick-up load 
*ll*«rad. $35. CaU 421-7330. 

28TFN 



SI.LMniA 



JOYNER PROFESSIONAL 
LANDSCAHNG and lawn ser- 
vice. F^ ettunates. 543-4949. 

29TI I 



31. 



3 



RECONDITIONED - IBM and 
Smith Corona electric 
typewriten, also reconditioned 
Roj«l 1700 office copiCT. (WET) 
CUI«7-8778. 
31-IT-2/g 

COMPUTER ■ ZESOX 820 with 

Diablo 630 printer, SVt inch 
drice. software included. S3,000. 
CaU 468-3792. 
31^-2/9 



l^^fca ^^••^WWw • IW ^wwHa 



STORES AND STORAGE areas 

- AlLsizes. Properties unUmited. 
Marvin Goldfarb. 399-8390, 484- 
1275. 
^ 32TFN 



33. A» s i Irh r U ft Hint 



APARTMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS - Great Bridge. 4 
locations, one and 2 bedroom 
apartments. From $260. Rental 
office, 482-3373, evenings 482- 
1492. 369 Johnstown Road. 
33TFN 

GREEN RUN • In Virginia 
Beadi, Apartmenu for adulb. 1 
and 2 bedroom Garden Style and 
2 bedroom townhouses. We pay 
heat and hot water. The Pines. 
CaU 468-2000. 7 
33-TFN 



c 



34.llMMsFtrlsRt 



ROOM FOR RENT - With kit- 
chen privUedges. Great Brid^ 
area (Wttson Hdghto). Very nice 
room. CaU 347-2830. 
344T2-? 

SHARE A BRIGHT Sunny 
Townhouse - HiUtop area. $173 a 
month includes aU utiUtks. CaU 
486-7939. Prefer non-smoker. 
34IT2-2 



^.NMMMFgrllMt 



2 B^RQOM DUPLEX - IH 

blocks t6 Chesapeake Bay. Low 
Vepco, off street parking, 
vacant, year lease. LETOUR- 
NEOU REALTY, 481-0612. 

I 3>.ir> rtEgtete 1 

KEM^SVILLE Beautifully 
decorated Uke model, 2 story 
home, 3 bedroom, 2'A bath, 
fireplace, fenced yard, green 
house wimlow. Many extras. By 
owiwr. CaU 493-2666 anytime. 
: 3fr4T-2/9 



E: 



3t.PrgfMsiMnlS«vlcgg 




J 



INCCNtfE TAX - and Account- 
ing (induding tax audiu). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Agent, 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd., (near 
Rosemont Rd.) CaU 463-6608. 
. 39-TFN 

BOOKKEEPING - Monthly 
balance^heet, PAL detaOed 
bial balance from your checks 
and recripto, stubs, or register 
Upes. 94rs and VA-3's. Up to 
200 checkbook transactions 
monthly; $45. Payables, recdv- 
able, smaU payrcM. Ch esapeak e 
only. CaU 420-6623. 

39-TFN 

BOOKKEVING SElt»<w. - 
Including quarterly inyroll 
reporto and tank account recoa- 
dUation. Specializing in sma.^ 
I^iqirktonhips. Pick up and 
deUvery. Retired profesiomU. 
CaU 420-3624. 

39TTN 



M, tsiiltii 



1 



TYPING SERVICE - For 

businesses a«l i atf vM ua ts. 7 
dajn a week, IBM Selactric. 
RcMo n a bte /atcs. CaU etther 
467-7112, Kempsvffle area, or 
463r0236. Hilltop/Pembroke 



fsun 



-hMiicas,berry pm^ ud 



40TTN 

ALL TYPES ALTSRNATDK 

and stvten rspaned. Banleiidd 
Auto Electric. CtM 347-3230. 

m-TFN 

■OOUEBPD . Wii do books 
m WKf 



pint aittrlal effcnd by oae (tf 
Viiginta's largM gro w us . fne 
0019 48 page PIntiBg OvMe- 
GMlQg ta ceikx, on rsqwat. 
'^Sfmakfmo N«rs«ics lac. 
W9aesbero.VA»N0. 
»IT2^ 

Mnj^-Ruiijai AMI tn^ 

t^^^^Ut^A I II II f mMaA li ■ .t *■ - ■ * 

aBFeoaea wooa ubq oara nnro- 
veod, tnMkloirf, aay Mm. 
ow ahrgbs. Oct aew 
! on ale. We ddiver in osk 
Ifaqr- 853^S» or 853-7467. 

29TFN 



ndt-V and delivery 

Cai 945.4016 Mar 5 pjB. for 



40HTFN 



WAUPAmsn . Btmrim- 
oad. refcraeaB, il wort gaaiM- 
Had. S7 a loi, Gil »7.1fM aik 



40 4T 2-23 



rAIBAKAKNTiU. 

Leii 
fori 

tfoa. CMI Hsb ai «l|.31?7 or 
4Bl-eH2. LatovaaoH lUal^. 
402T24 



41. MfpgRtry 



4t. 




CARPENTRY. PAINTING, 
ROOIING - and all types of 
maintenanix. Storm windows, 
guttera and screens repaired. 
Free estimates. Sanden Con- 
struction . 420-843 3 . 

41TFN 



L.S.M. MOVERS - We 

ipecitlize in imall jobs, 
deliveries, and local moving. CaU 
day or ni^t 499-3151. 
494T2.? 



42. CUM Cart 



: 



BABYSrn;ER - My Hunten 
Point hoine (Pwtsmouth) CaU 
483-0115. 
42 IT 2-2 

BABYSrrnNG • My home in. 

East LitUe Creek, fenced yard, 

playroom, low rates. Call 480- 

1932. 

42 4T 2-16 

BABYSrmNG ■ My home, 
days, reasonable rates. Any age. 
CaU 4994371. 
42 IT 2-2 

CHILDCARE - In My NorfoUc 
home. Across from Vepco. Any 
age, any time. CaU 853-3279. 

42 IT 2-2 

CHILD CARE • Looking for 
chUdren to watch in my home. 
Ages 3 and up. CaU 721-2004. 
421T2-2 



SI. 



PAINTING . Large or smaU 
jobs. Interior and nterior. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
iviees. References available upon 
requeu. Commerdal work also 
done, and light carpentry and 
wallpapering experience. Call 
397-5483 or 484-1425. 

51TFN 

WALLPAPERING AND 
PAINTING-Fast and friendly 
Mrvice, local references fur- 
nished. Call us for a free 
estimate. Arthur and Company 
Redecorating Contractors. 420- 
3478. 

5ITFN 



52.nwte|nHiy 



47- 



■MptWgRMIlt I 



ADDITIONS, ROOMS - car- 
pentry, roofing, sidiiv. storm 
window, storm doors, plastering, 
electric, concrete work, plum- 
bing, guttering, remodeling, kit- 
chen and baUu, brick and Mock 
work, aluminum siding, 
fireplaces, carpeting painting, 
qiedaUzing in parking areas and 
driveways, all type of 
demoU^n, free estimate wiUiout 
obligation, prompt service. Ser- 
ving aU of Tidewater. Bonded 
and Insured, Sute Registered. 
CaU 625-7435, 623-6148, or 499- 
5516. 
47-TFN 



THE LEIGH PHOTOGRA- 
PHIC SERVICE - Offen fuU 
coverage of your needs at your 
wedding. Please call for more in- 
formation and open dates. 482- 
1312. 

??-TFN 




S& 



BATHROOM REMODELING • 

Old and new. SpeciaUzing in 
ceramk tile waUs and floor 
covering. Reasonable rates. Free 
estimaes. 20 yean experience in 
Tidewater area. Small and large 
fobs. Guarantee aU work. CaU 
S47-4774 anytime. 

ti 55TFN 



47. 



•iitl 




N.SMriRgiAKiratigM 



3 



ADDITIONS - Rooms, garages, 

convert gar/ges, decks, etc. 

Quality work by a licensed 

builder. Free estimates. CaU 340- 

2511< 

47TFN 



, ^ SEARS JEWING MACHINES - 

Twitii cabinet,. $75.. J witiwut 
caMnat S25. Call 420-7719. 
56ITN 



FOR 
SALe 

lakm Gotten Chalat. 4 
badroom, 2 batha, 2 
fir«ploc*t, 6 glass 
sliding doors— Glass' 
Cathedral calling and 
cantrol h«ot and air 
condition, doubt* 
garog* — boat hous* 
and pior. tm§1 viow on 
th* lok*. Coil Wr*f^ 
Horrall, (804) 8»-970« 
Of (919)366-5485. 



SALES 

Interested In 
Making Big 

'*BUCKS" 

CaU Immediately 

463-3540 



c^ 



HCMiE 
IMPROVSIENT 



parpesci. Coivtrt 



Aaj type of Iri^vv. 
■mt nuhrooB Rid 
Kilckca reaodcHiig. 

R.H.BLACX 

3»M)99 397.717S 



GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Ho^» sites /or utk 
for 

H(mesd Custom 
Gilders 

SALES OFFICC 
333Pn>vMeMclU. 



CALL 464-9317 



When Something Needs 
Building or Repaired, You Need 

BLACK 
BROS. 

Home Improvement 

SpcciuU.sl.s 
•Buikiiiifi 1 onl racmr* Kuufs'Carpuri s'Ciarages 
•Ball) Remodeled* Room Additions 
•Aluminum Sidmg.s«Kitchen Remodeling 

545-7318 

llMffliK.Btorh.Sr. 





$795.00 

(CALLTOOAY) 

^TATE LINE BUILDERS 

Ganges • UtUity Bvns • Any Scv 

BUwnrMI „ 

MnMk,N.C.27M JttlLE^ 



16 Virginia Beach Sun, February 2, 1983 



Greenbrier - Chrysler Plymouth 




Greenbrier Chrysler- 
Plymouth, Inc., Virginia's 
Largest Chrysler, 
Plymouth, Imperial, Van 
World. AMC, Jeep and 
Renault dealer, has come 
a long way since pur- 
chasing the old Wynne 
Franchise in June, 1979. 

During this^short period 
of time, Greenbrier won 
the Five Star Quality Ser- 



vice Award, Chrysler 
Corporation's highest 
award of service. 

More recently, the 
dealership received 
Chrysler's National 
"Award for Excellence." 
This prestigious award is 
based on a dealership's 
sales performance, their 
facilities, customer 
service, dealership ad- 



ministration and their 
community relations 
program. These criteria 
are applied over a full year 
of operations, which 
makes the award very dif- 
ficult to win. 

When Greenbrier pur- 
chased the AMC, Jeep, 
Renault franchise a short 
time ago, they built a New 
Sales Facility and Service 



Area to accommodate the 
increased auto sales and 
service department 
patronage. 

Greenbrier offers a full 
choice of American 
Motors cars. Jeeps, 
Renaults and a parts and 
service department with a 
professionally trained 
stoff ready to serve the 
public. 




1913 Colt. 
Fas Aid Fancy-FrM 

This is the car with fun-to-drive value, economy, ef- 
ficiency, and a lot of spirit tO'spare. This is the front- 
wheel drive Plymouth Colt from the Master Car 
Builders of Japan - Mitsubishi Motors Corporation. 

For 1983, you'll discover that Colt's proven value and 
economy never looked so good or offered such a selec- 
tion. There's a Colt three-door model that is available in 
base. Deluxe or Custom trim, plus a distinctively sporty 
RS Package. 

Perhaps you need the convMence of a five-door hat- 
chback. Look no further. The C^ five-door model of- 
fers you a choice of base or Custom models, pliu the 
added luxury of the LS Package. 




Plymouth ReUant 

The highest mileage, six-passenger f ront-whed drive car 

in America. 

The Plymouth Reliant. The car that now stands 
"tri«l" and "true" on the Amoican road. The car 
proven to be an outstanding value among family-size 
front-wheel drive cars. 

If your taste is for contemporary styling, superior fuel 
efficiency, and six-passenger room and comfort - all 
with engineered - in quality and value - Reliant offers 
three different ways for you to go. 

Plymouth Reliant Four-Door. {Plymouth Reliant 
Door and Plymouth Reliant Wagons. 





1983 Chrysler E Class. 

Chrysler's largest front-wheel drive sedan. 

Chrysler E. Class. America's newest front-wheel 
drive automobile, offers a highly desirable combination 
of six-passoiger room, outstanding ride and handling, 
and sdperb styling - all in an efficient, contemporary 
size. 

Appointed with a wealth of fine toucHes. the Chrysler 
E Class sedan rests on a 103-inch whcclbase to offer ex- 
cellent overall interior roominess that includes a 
spacious rear seat. It also carries a deep 17-cubio-foot 
trunk. 




1993 Dodge Customized Family Fun Vans 

Perfect for the large family's around town use and for 
all families who travel anywhere. ^ 

You'll ride in the comfort of your living room in high 
back, fully reclining Qiptain's Chairs. Or let the kids 
settle in on the sofa sleeper. Inside ycxi'U find a wet bar 
with sink and ice box to cut down on those frequent 
stops, and you'll listen to the quality stereo system 
throughout your van. 

These vans are customized to your individual tastes 
and needs and are the perfect first vehicle to ride 
around town or travel in. 

We have vans in stock as low as $9,888 right now. 



You don't give 
up a thing at 
Budget 

1 



WHERE 
YOU'RE 





Dcpcmiable, well maintaiaed 
tnclu tai tke liic yon Mcd 

• MotI BU^or credit cards 
boBorcd. 

• Power ileeriag and 
aalomaik tranailasioM 
oa most tracks 

Free Hcii-ap aad ddlvcfjr 

FOR LOCAL RESERVATIONS, CALL: 



486-2500 

Convealent Location In: 

NOBFOU. VA. BEACH, POBTSMOUTH * CHESAPEAKE 



iBudgeti 



lENTATmUCK 



SPECIAL PRICES ON ALL CUSTOM VANS 

AS LOW AS $Q7fifi< 



• • • 



NO ONE ANYWHERE WILL OUT 
SELL OR OUT TRADE VIRGINIA'S 
LARGEST VAN DEALER. 



y&^ 





463-6100 



3443 Va. Beach Blvd. 
Next To Princess Aime Plaza 

DMV8502 



USED CARS THAT 
WERE USED WELL 



ir» CHEV. c-ia ncxup 

V-i. ABto.,if.S. 



Sa.ll3«7C 



•896 



19T7 ASPEN WAGON 
ABt6:,P.S.,P.B.,VC AM/ 
FMSteTM 



stk.irTesiA 



•1,886 



1979 MGB 

4 SkH.AM/FM Stereo 



Sd(.#(3MA 



19«2C-M 
Aalo., P.S., P.B. 

Slk.r73«3A 



i^yDoO 



IMl MERCURY LYNX Coapc 
4 Cyl., 4 Speed, AM/FM Stereo 



Stk.#7M9A 



•3,586 



1M9 NOVA 4 Door 
Good TraasportatloB 



•5,9M stk-^TisiA 



•386 



19aaFORDF-lS0Piclav 

4 Speed, O.D., PS.. AM Radio 

Stk. # T7M A « Cyl. *5,986 

Wn NOVA 

Aalo., F.S.,P.R.,A.C. Low 

kUeafc 

Sik. # 1334A ^4,486 

ina Plymouth hcnuzon 

4Cyi.4Spd..A.C. 
Stk.#7»3A •3,M6 



1980 IMP ALA WAGON 
9 Pancagcr, Aato., P.S., P.B. 
A/C, AM/FM Stereo 



Stk.<l'1349A 



•5,186 



19W V W BUS VANAGON 
9PaMeager,4-Spced 



Stk.fMTOA 



•7,686 



197* C-M 
3^.,P.S.,P.B. 

Sik. 1 113SK 



19t2C-l« FLEET SIDE 
«Cyl..4Speod 

Stt.#msA '5,986 



'1,386 




Peugeot^ Alfa Romeo 



LYNNHAVEN PARKWAY 
AT VA. BEACH BLVD. 

486-2222 

DMV050 



Perry Buick 

Presents The 

Front Wheel Drive 

Performers 




Skyhawk 

46-28 

Hwy. Mpg 



Skylark 

42-27 

Hwy. Mm 



Century 

39-24 

Hwy. Mpg 



Buick's Designs 
For Driving 




PERRY BUICK 

MS} VIRGINIA JttACM UVD. 

IN mnmx at ranrrowN mad 

NKRVINf, 1 1DKWATER OVER 12 WJiltH 

461-8855 



AT KLINE CHEVROLET, 

YOU CAN GET A VAN 

WITH EVERY1[HING 

TOGO. 

—THE NEW 

WORLD 

CONTINUES— 




with constant, internal 
developments and 
we offer yon 
ty, bvUt-in 
conveniences 
not added 
on! This 
is the 
differcncel 




Inspection proccM can 
afford yoa tomiMc-fKe 
ecoaomy wad c^|oyHMri 
te tanry aad rooayacM 
to fit 



Dtacover 
how high passcagcr- 
otfles-pcr-jallon and the 
16 step "G^den Touch 



yoandf ubm 
iscaicr- aad 



nobctlH' 

tfaw to explore how yoa 

U. S. CoavMriMs 



caa iw 
M's. 



'la taae with the 




KLINE 

CHEVROLET 



H^S.MlUtaryH^lnniy 
3 Miles SouOi Of RflOtary Circle 

424-1811 



WYNNE MOTOR 
CORP. 



"> 695 



10.895 



'*} V)s 



U .895 



\\\ %M MOIORCCIRP. 



wfm 



ppp 



Complete Virginia Beach Coimcil Actions 



Tlie Virgi n ia Beac 

$m Year. No. 6. Virginia BcMk.Va. ^^-^^ Fdmlry 9, 19S3 






m 



Page 14 



in 



^tn 



25 Cents 



tc^ 



:-y*»« 



<> 




Jennings Says 



^^age^ 



Celebrating tlie groundbrealcing for Lociiniann's Plaza at Ttialla Wayside In Virginia Beach arc, left to righi: 
Joseph Mersel, Senior Vice President of S. L. Nusbaum and Conpany, Inc.; members of Virginia Beach O^ 
Council, Robert Jones, Meyera Oberndorf, Nancy Creech and Dr. Henry McCoy, Jr.; Bob Berry of C A P 
Telephone and the Vi^nia Beach Chamber of Commerce; David Embree of Hofheimer, Nusbaym McPhaul and 
Brenner; and architect Stanley Bnimdage. 

Loehmann Plaza To Open This Fall 



(^(Hindbreaidng ceremmies were recently held to 
Loehmann's Plaza at Thalia Wayside, a Virginia Beach 
shopping complex which will house Loehmann's, the 
world's largest retailer of women's off-price designer 
clothing; a food court featuring primarily Tidewater 
specialties; and a separate group of off-price and 
specialty retail shc^s. 

"This is the most exciting retail happening in 
Udewater in a very long time," says Joseph Mersel, 
SenicM- Vice President crf^.L. Nusbaum and Company, 
Inc., the firm which <rBl be developing and leasing 
space at Ijoehmann's Haza. "This will be a unique 
shopping center-there are few like it in the entire 
country." 

The 115,000 square foot Plaza will feature a food 
court called Thalia Hall. Although the festive atmos- 
phere will invite shoppers to stay, many prepared foods 
can be talcen ait. Also fa sale will be the pick of the 
crop of fresh produce, fresh cut meat and seafood, and 
other gourmet items for at-hc«ne preparation. 




Practicing For Playoffs 



PiiKcas A«»e Co«A Leo AMhMy, tackgrMMl, walcM m 
Chrit Riley l» parted fcy teMMMk Hmrard C«r in practice. 
PA b flsUiat for • ptoy«ff »po».— Stoty, ^t* * 



Other shops which have already leased space in 
Loehmann's Plaza at Thalia Wayside, in addition to 
Loehmann's, include: Linens N Things, Bag and 
Baggage, Tanner Dresses, Fashirai Alley, Raphael 
Haircutting Centers, Calico Comers and Delta Hosiery. 
Negotiations are underway with other retailers, both 
local and from outside the market, fw the remainder rf 
the retail space. 

Loehmann's Plaza will have an old-wwld Spant^ 
motif outside and an exciting festival atfflosj;>M^ 
inside. Convenient storefront parking will be abundant 
and the Raza is ideally located ai Virginia Beach 
Boulevard at Thalia, east of Willis Wayside and the 
new Virginia Beach Public Library site. 

Architects and Designers for the project are 
Brundage-Kroskin and Associates and Merry Lane 
Lauder of G.L Wilson, General Omtractor. 

Loehmann's Plaza at Thalia Wayside will be c^n for 
business this coming fall. 



First Colonial Athlete 

Will Forbes Honored 
By Beach Council 

ByLeeCahill 
Sim Qmiteii Reporter 

Will Forbes, a 17-year-<rfd senior at First Colonial 
Higb School, has been honored for his athletic 
achievements in a resolution adopted Monday after- 
noon by Virginia Brach City Council. 

F(H^b(^, Tidewater's leading rusher with 1,573 yards 
in 173 attempts^ in regular-season play, was recognized 
by the Vlrginkm-PUot/ Ledger-Star sportswriters as 
Player of the Year. 

He scored 23 touchdowns, more than any other 
player; he topped the Beach EHstrict in point-making 
with 138 and ranked second area-wide after leading un- 
til the final game. 

He is most noted for his offensive talent-eight passes 
for over 100 yards and puntii^ a 35.5 )wd average, but he 
excdb in defense, where be had two intercqHioos, 29 
tackles and averaged 19.4 yards in kick-off returns for 
Futt Colonial in 1982. He is five feet, six inches, weighs 
165 pounds, and his coach, Frank Webster, says, 
"There are bigger, stronger and faster high school foot- 
ball players in Tidewater, but none better." 

Councilman Jack Jennings who coached Forbes when 
be was in the Kings Grant-Plaza Football League, said 
that the league won the flag championship that year due 
to Forb«', efforts. 



City Wouldn't Take 
* A Licking' If It Sold 
New Main Library Site 

Build A New Library; Or Rent Former Woolco Store? 



^w 



ByOregGoldfarb 

Sun Editor 

While city atfaninistrators remain uncertain over the 
future of Virginia Beadi's new central library site, 
along with them is Lynnhaven Borough Councilman H. 
Jack Jennings, in whose borough it would be located. 

"I haven't heard from the library board and I don't 
believe that I'm going to see a side by side cost 
comparison," said Jennings in reference to choosing 
between building a new facility in Pembroke for the 
city's central library or using an abandoned department 
store near the Lynnhaven Parkway. 

"Using the Woolco store is a rather innovative idea," 
he continued, "with some possibly strong advantages; 
but also with some aesthetic disadvantages." 
Jennings added, "I want to see the dollar value." 

Originally, the city planned to build the 90,000 
square foot main library on seven acres it bought from 
Edward S. Garcia for S65,000 an acre last spring. The 
site is just east of the Willis Wayside Furniture Co. on 
the north side of Virginia Beach Boulevard in Thalia. 

But local developer F. Wayne McLeskey, Jr., has 
since then offered to lease the 115,000 square fooft dd 
Woolco store atJhe intersection of Lynnhaven Road 
and Virginia Beach Boulevard for $495,000 a year for 12 
years. 

What would the city do with the land it bought from 
Garcia? "I've been told that Garda's property could be 
easily sokl and the city not take a licking," Jennings 
said. 

If the city picks this site, (Qty Manager Thomas 
Muehlenbeck is still receiving recommendaUoos from 
various diy departmenU on the question) it will raise 
,0ie ire of Gtrca. 

* "They (the city) said they wanted prc^jerty for a 
master Ubrary site," Garcia said. "I dai't give my 
property away at a ridiculous price for them to resale it. 
When I do something fw the city I don't want to feel 
that I was duped into it." 

According to James Hall, president of James Hall 
and Associates, Inc., Virginia Beach, Garcia's selling 
agent for the property, Garcia reduced the price of the 
land from $100,000 an acre to $65,000 an acre because 
the city said it was going to build a library <yi it. Hall 
said the land today is worth over SIOO.OOO an acre. 

Although Garcia has formally relinquished owner- 
ship of the property, he said "I'm not so certain" that 
he doesn't have recourse against the city if they doi't 



Jennings 

use the properly it bought from him for its original 
intended purpose. Hall, however, said he didn't think 
Garcia has a case, per the language of the sales con- 
contract. 



"If they want to spectulate in real 
estate let me know, I've got some ad- 
ditional land I'll sell them" - former 
library site owner, Eddie S. Garcia 



"If they (the city) want to speculate in real estate let 
me know," Garcia said. "I've got some additional land 
I'll sell them." 

Garcia said he sold his land to the city to enhance the 
property of the remaining 40 acres he owns around the 
library site. Garcia had owned a 60 acre parcel before 
he sold a portion to the city for the library site and 
another portion for the upcoming Loehmann's Plaza. 
On the remaining 40 acres he plans to build 3SS 
townhouses. 

"It's no secret that I sold the library site land at a 
reduced rate to enhance the value of my other 
property," Garcia said, noting that he had envisioned a 
small community concept there in Thalia with a library, 
homes, and shopping conveniences. 

Garcia that said at this point in time he'll "wait and 
see" what the city decides to do about the library. "But 
if they decide to sell the library site 1 hope they'lJ five 
me first right of refusal," he said. 

Garcia also added that he would built the library from 
start to finish for $8 million. 

City Manager Muehlenbeck is studying recommen- 
dations from the city's library, public works, and finan- 
ce department and a private consultant before deciding 
on which location to choose for the new library. 

Ora Lambert, Director of Public Works, and Martha 
Sims, Library Director have both recommended 
building a new library cxi the new site. They based their 
decision on cost and efficiency. Finance Director Giles 
Dodd could not be reached by deadline. 



. « 



'Wrong Place, Wrong Time/' Deal Says 



William F. Deal of the Virginia Beach-based 
aU D«l and the Rhondels musical group, recen- 
Uy responded to a story in last week's The Virginia 
Beach Sun which discussed Deal's arrest m Rich- 
mond two weeks ago on cocaine charges. (He 
could not be reached before the story was 

published). , .., . . . 

"Your story was excellent," said Deal. 1 think 
you were va7 thorough and complete. 

Dai called his situation "a classic case of a guy 
being in the wrong place at the wrong time." Said 
D«I' "I can't get into any of the specifics of the 
case reaUy. All that happened was I walked up to 



a truck that was about to be bust^ and I got 
caught up in it. 

"If ever th»e was a case where a mistake was 
made, this was it," he »idRi. 

Deal was vretted two weeks ago outside a con- 
venieiKX store in tkw imt caiMtal. Ht was charged 
with possession of cocaine with intent to 
(fistribute. Pcrfice sd«d mc^e than $8,000 in cash 
akmg with three vid om-iuM (wm^ of cocaine. 
D»U, arrat^ along with thrM other persons, was 
released on $6,100 bond. The maximum p^alty 
for convktion in Deal's <ase is from five to 40 
^HS i^an»«tion and up to $25,000 in fines. 




Which Site Is Right? 



City Manager Thomas Muehlenbeck is expected to soon 
decide which site will host Virginia Beach's new central library. 
Build it on the lot above? Or rent the former Woolco building, 
IMCtured below. 




■MM 



mam 



■i 



■p 



■■I 



2 Virginia Beach Sun. February 9, 1983 



/ 



Sun Commentary 







Editorials 



Fired Up Over Apple Butter 

The Virgim* Beach Jaycees arc fired relaxation every summer for handicapped 



up. 

Over what? 

Apple butter. 

The Virginia Beach Jaycees are fired up 
over apple butter. The Jaycees are selling 



kids across the state; which proves to be 
an enrichment for the kids, and time for 
the parents to sit back and catch their 
breath. 
Most members of the Virginia Beach 



12 oz. jars of it for $1 a jar. Fifty cents go Jaycees are selling the apple butter. Or, 

to the Jaycees, fifty cents goes to Camp stop by The Virginia Beach Sun office in 

Virginia Jaycees for mentally and The Sun Building on Roscmont Road and 

physically handicapped kids. pick up a jar. 

Located near Roanoke, Camp Virginia Why don't you get fired up over apple 

Jaycees offers a week of fun and butter, too?— G.D.G. 



Borrowing Money 

If Virginia Beach provides any sort of the bank executives told those in attcn- 
litmus test, maybe Ronald Reagan is right dance that common sense and prudence 



after all 

Maybe the nation's economy is back on 
the road to salvation as the pr^ident 
predicts. 

Last week, officials from 11 local 
banking institutions met with Beach 
businessmen at a breakfast meeting to 
clue them in on securing business loans. 



were the key factors loan officers consider 
in making their final determinations. 

One measure of any community's 
health is the strength of its business com- 
munity. Last year, some 9,000 business 
licenses were issued in Virginia Beach ac- 
cording to the office of the Commissioner 
of the Revenue. The chamber boasts 



"Borrowing-The Secret of Getting 1,000 members in its fold. Informative 
What You Want" was sponsored by the sessions for the city's businessmen, such 



Virginia Beach Chamber of Commerce 
and was very well attended; Valie's 
restaurant on Virginia Beach Boulevard 
was packed. It was there that members of 
the city's business community were given 
tips on how to get ahead by the corporate 
heads of such institutions as Central 
Fidelity, Citizen's Trust, Bank of Virginia 
Beach and Virginia Beach Bank of Com- 
merce. 

The financial soothsayers ,d|d not call 
for crystal balls or magic wands. Instead, 



as last week's, are of utmost benefit to 
everyone in this city, and the chamber is 
to be commended for organizing the af- 
fair. Much good, no doubt, will be the 
result. 

On the broad scope, the meeting can be 
interpreted as at least one good note in an 
otherwise very troubled national score. 

It was one glimmer of hope in an 
otherwise dismal horizon. Maybe the 
president knows something we don't. 
Let's hope so.— M.M.G^ 



Build The Library 



If city officials are serious about 
developing the Pembroke section as 
Virginia Beach's "downtown," what 
could be more appealing or attractive 
than adding a brand new library to the 
scenario? 

In fact, everything was rolling along 
until a local developo- placed an aban- 
doned building, near Lynnhaven, on the 
trading block, with promises of financial 
savings to the city. 

Financially, under the developer's plan, 
the city would pay almost $6 million over 
a 12 year period just for rent. It is 
estimated that another $3 million would 
be needed to revamp the interior of the 
building. With other odds and ends, the 
former department store would cost the 
city almost $10 million, with nothing to 
show for its investment at the end of the 
rental lease but an option to buy. 

For $11 million, or less, the city can 
build a brand new library in Pembroke, 
which will fulfill the dr^uns of what 
locals feel the library ought to be. In ad- 



dition, the library would accentuate the 
forthcoming Loehmann's Plaza, and be 
an added inducement for new residents to 
occupy the 350 plus townhouses which are 
on tap to be built behind Loehmann's in 
the future. 

The city purchased the seven acres last 
spring for $65,000 an acre. Today the 
land is worth at least $100,000 an acre. 
But the reason the land was sold at that 
price was to give the city an incentive to 
build the library there, which will enhance 
the property values of the surrounding 
land. If the city did not use the land for a 
library site, as one councilman has 
suggested, and resold the property to 
make a profit, some people would accuse 
the city of being opportunistic capitalists, 
which of course would not be entirely ac- 
accurate. 

The best thing to do is move ahead with 
the original plans, build a new pr^tigious 
central library for the dty, and forget 
about trying to make ends meet with an 
inadequate facility.— G.D.G. 



Again 



When The Virginian Pilot reported that 
the Virginia Beach Police Department 
placed responding to burglary alarm calls 
as a low priority item, burglars across the 
area must have shouted for joy. 

The police department made the move 
several months ago, because nine out of 
ten of the caUs were false alarms and it 
was also dangerous for patrol cars to tear 
down the street to find out. 

Wisely, the department has modifi«l its 



position to allow for speedy mponse to 
burglar alarm calls when there is good 
reason to believe that the burglary alarm 
is real. In actuality, this is the same policy 
the police department has had all along. 
But b«:ause The Virginian-Pilot chose to 
exploit the item with banno* headlines, 
the possibility of incr^is^ burglaries in 
the city rose, and another "news story" 
was created at the city's expense. 
—G.D.G. 



Letters To The Editor 



At Last, A Favorable Story On Wall 



Editor: 

At long last, a newspaper story has been printed 
which was actually favorable towards Police Chief 
Charles R, Wall. In my opinion, it was about time. 

As a former policeman out west, I know first hand 
that the job is, in many ways, thankless. For a pdice 
chief, though, the jt* is twice as bad. He receives all 
the criticism when things go wrong, yet no praise when 



things go right. 

From what I have observed of Wall, he is a very fine 
administrator and police trfficer. Virginia Beach is liicky 
to have him and The Sun. 

Wallace T. Smith 
Virginia Beach 



No Drugs In Orkney 



Editor: 

Drugs, drugs, drugs. That's all you read about in the 
papers anymore. 

Out here in the Commoowealth's heartland, there is 
no problem with drugs. Why? Because out here, we 
have good people, hard-working and God-fearing. 
There is no time to fool with drugs; fdks here are too 
busy earning a living to keep bread on the table. 

I think the drug problem, such as the one you 



examined in Virginia Beach, can be blamed on the rich 
and the idle. All these rich people have so much spare 
time and spare money that they don't know what to do 
with themselves. 

Drugs, like idle time, are tools of the Devil. Anyone 
who uses them in any way is destined to bum in Hell. 

Stanley P. Wilson, III 
Orkney Springs, Va. 



What's Good For Dogs Is Good For Cats 



Edit<H' 

What's good for dogs is good for cau, and that 
goes for rabies vaccinations. In fact, a point can 
be made that cats especially need rabies vac- 
cinations more so than do dop, ami I shall nuke 
that point now. 

Dop, for the most part, stay close to the house, 
but cals arc wandners. Catx are generally less 
.supervised lliiiii iliclr luil-wuggiiig rriciid-s, and a 
lone cat with rabies, meeting other lone cats, can 
infect plenty with the disease before anyone cat- 



ches on. in the case of m(^t dOp, they would, if 
infected, be detected quickly, and be disposed of 
in short ordo-. 

I don't know who is responsible for this stupid 
law, but it should be struck from the code. And 
with an unusually high incidence of rabies forecast 
for this year, we would do well to have our cats 
vaccinated. 

Lillian Creasy 
Chesapeake 



Delegate McClanan Reports 



Controversy Surrounds Session 



Many proposed changes in the Virginia law 
made the headlines in Richmond this past week. 
A very ccmtroversial piece of legislation was the 
proposed Virginia Lottery Bill. It passed the 
General Laws Committee and now is headed for 
debate in the House. If the bill is passed by both 
houses it wiU gp before the voters to feferendom 
at the general-election next November; 

The Coal-slurry Pipeline Bill was defeated in 
the committee oi corporations, insurance and 
banking. Now there is strong (^position to having 
the study done. The Railroad Interest Groups are 
now seeking to kill the study also. 

Ihere is also strcmg opposition to a bill that 
would restore the "Waiting Week" to unemploy- 
ment compensatioi. Union members are strongly 
opposed to this bill. Hie legislation would 
eliminate the first week's payment of unemploy- 
ment beneflu but restore it as a 27th week 
payment oaxx an unemployment wcvker had gone 
through the maximum 26 weeks of benefits. Since 
most of those out of work find new jol» before 
unemployment runs out, the "Waiting Week" 
payments would not have to be paid. The savings 
could be applied to building up the state's 
dwindling unemployment compensation fund. 

The Natural Death Act Bill, that would allow a 
terminally ill person to decide, either orally cr in 
writing, whether he wants to be kept alive by 
artificial means, was approved in the Committee 
on Health. Welfare and Institutions. Ibe Natural 
Death Act will now go to the House floor fior 
consideration. The bill would aUow a person to 
dedde whether he wants to remain alive through 
medical measures. It would also grant legal 
immunity to doctors, £unilies or anyone else 
involved in the decision of the terminally ill 
patient, the bill idso would require that 
statements or documents like living wiU be 
honored. Riaht-to-die cases have cksged the 
court systems in re(^nt years, and jua^ies have 
asked that they receive some judicial of legislative 



Virginia Beach 
General Assembly 
Delegate Glenn B. 
McClanan, (D) 




McCbuiaa 

guide lines in such matters. 

Hus week the House gave final ^proval and 
sent to the Senate measures that would: 
•Allow a judge to revoke for up to 12 months 
the drivers's license (tf anyone under 21 who 
illegally obtained alcholic beverages by using 
a fraudulent drier's license. 
•Require the opentors oimopeds to be at least 
16 years old and pass a rules-of-the-roed test 
given by the Division of Motor Vehicles. 
•To establish a sUUe commission on Indian 
Afhirs. 

•Specify acts that would constitute criminal 
violation of the stir's laws against child 
pornography. 

Delegate Oeai B. McOana, 510 General 
AascaMr BidMlai, 910 Oqrftol Straet, Rich- 
I, Vbgliya 2321f . 

My tekphom number in Richmond is 786-7105. 



What's On Your Mind? Let Us Know! 

The Virginia Beach Sun welcomes and encourages tetters to the editor on any and all Virginia Beach 
issues, as well as any other issues, questions or concerns affecting the well being of the Virginia Beach 
community. Letters should be typed, doubte spaced and indude the writers name, address and telephone 
number. Mail letters to The Virginia Beach &ui, 138 S. Roiraiont Road, Virpnia Beach, Va. 234S2. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

138 South RosemoBt Road, Vir^nia Beack, Va. 23452 Phone (804) 486-3430 
USPS-660-140; PoWished Wednesdays 



Haacs^tf^ 



GRfCMdftok 
Editor 

Within lidewatai^ea 

OneYear-$9 

All Otiwr Areas 

OneYear-Sll 

TwoY«r$-$l7 

Secoiuf Class Posta^ is pakl at Lynnhavm &ati(m, 

Virginia Bei^rh, Virginia 

7«« FlTf Mil /iMcA SliiR b a Heabcr eff Tte VhiWa BtMk OHMbcr of CowawRc 



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Virsinia Beach Happeninss This Week 



Virginia Beach Sun, February 9, 19&3 3 



vV^dnesday 



Republican Women At Red Lobster 

The Beach Suburban Republkan Women's Qub will 
hold its monthly luncheon meeting at the Re4 Lobster, 
on Indepcndance Boulevard, Wednesday, Feb. 9, at 
1 1:30 a.m. Guest speaker will be pty Councilman Jack 
Jennings, who will discuss current council miuters of 
interest. Reservation to Sandy Fruit 480-4358 or Peggy 
Beda 481-2214 by Monday, Feb. 7. 

Ocean Park Women To Meet 

The GFWC Ocean Park Woman's Club wiU hold its 
monthly meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 9, at 11 a.m. in 
the clubroom at the Ocean Park fire station. 

Sergeant Sydney Akers, Game and Inland Fisheries, 
will speak on conservation. 

Hostesses for the luncheon will be Mrs. C. A. 
Weekley and Mrs. H. H. Bryan. 

Call 499-5788 for more information. 



Couples Club At Bow Creek 

Virginia Beach Couples Club, 10:30 a.m., Bow 
CfeekJtecfeaticMi Center. Dr. John Sbrega, chairman of 
Social Sciences at Tidewater Community College, will 
speak on World War II. Following the meeting, there 
will be a bus trip to tour Westminster-Canterbury. A 
luncheon will be served for $4.50, 



Officers Wives At Bamboo Hut 

Amphibious Officers Wives' Qub, 11:30 p.m., 
Bamboo Hut, 2832 Virginia Beach Blvd. A luncheai 
will cost $5.30. ReservatiOTs must be made by Feb. 4. 



Bayside Hospital Foot Clinic 

Bayside Hospital presents "Foot Care: How Impor- 
tant Is h for the EHabetic?", 7 p.m., at the hospital. I>. 
Charles Ewing will speak. 



Charlestowne Women At Tandom's 

Charlestowne Women's Qub, 6:30 p.m., Tandcxn's 
F*ine Tree Inn. For infamation, call 467-7431. 

Schools Observe Two Events 

Virginia Beach Public Schools are observing two 
major events this week, Feb. 6 through 12: Vocational 
Education Week and National School Guidance and 
Counseling Week. 

Vocational Education Week; actually began with a 
special ceremony, live student demonstrations and static 
displays last Friday at Lynnhaveh Mall, highlighting the 
theme, "An Investment in People." The ceremony 
featured city and school officials cutting an opening 
day-ribbon in the center court of the mall. 

Students and teachers demonstrated to the public the 
vocational skills taught in secondary schools. Students 
from the Vocational-Technical Educational Center, the 
career Development Center, and most of the junior and 
senior high schools participated in the demonstrations. 
Static exhibits will be displayed through Friday, Feb. 
11. 

Virginia Beach Mayor Louis Jones has signed 
proclamations for both events, which will be displayed 
in all schools. 

During National School Guidance and Counseling 
week, school counselors in all secondary schools will be 
recognized for their services to students and their paren- 
ts. Counselors help the students understand themselves- 
-their abilities, strengths and talents~and guide them in 
the use of this knowledge to prepare for further 
education and to deal with today's complex society. 

Pavilion Host Boat Show 

Mid- Atlantic SpcHts and Boat Show, 6 to 9:30 p.m.. 
Pavilion. Tickets are $2.50 for adults and $1.25 for 
children. 



China Painters Club Meets 

Tidewater Oiina Painters Qub, 10 a.m.. Christian 
Church Uniting, 6049 Indian River Road. 

Anorexia To Be Discussed 

Multimodal Therapy Institute lecture "Anorexia, 
Bulimia: Treatment i^proaches. Long Term FoUow-H) 
and Self Help GrouiM," 7 p.m.. Suite 128, Pembrda 
Five Building. Fa- information, call 490-1007. 

Akers To Address Women 

General Federaticm of Women's Qubs Ocean Park 
Women's Qub, 11 a.m.. Ocean Park Fire Station. 
Sydney Akers, of the Game and Inland Fisherks, will 
speak on conservation. 



Newcomers Club Meets 

Newcomers' Qub, 7:30 p.m.. Life Federal Savings 
* and Loan. A program on Money Management will be 
given. For information, call 481-4286 or 467-8809. 



Crime Prevention Week 

In cainection with' Qime Prevention Week, Feb. 7 - 
14, the Virginia Beach Police Department has 
scheduled the following activities at Lynnhaven Mall: 

Wednesday, Feb. 9 from 1 to 9:30 p.m.: Marine 
patrol and Diving equipment on display. 

Thursday, Feb. 10 from 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.: Poli« 
motwcycle in display. 

Friday, Feb. 11-10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.. Police 
helicc^ter on display; 7 to 9:30 p.m.: S.W.A.T. 
equipment on display; 7 to 8:45 p.m.: K-9 (teBonstra- 

tlOT. 




Windsor Woods Celebrates 

Shadow puppets to celebrate the Chinese 
New Year will be demonstrated on Friday, 
Feb. 1 1 at the Windsor Woods area library. 



All displays and demonstratimis will be inside the 
mall in front of Rices Nachman's. 

Call Sgt. D.H. Kappers, Crime Prevention Cocffdi- 
nator, at 427-4146 for mcwe infn-mation. 

Up With People Premiers 

The Up With Pec^le Show, 8 p.m., Little Greek Base 
Theater. Ticl»ts are $4. 



Civic Organization Meets 

CcHincil of Qvic Organizations of Virginia Beach Inc., 
7:30 p.m., City Council Chambers, City Hall. Represen- 
tatives frcmi all Virginia Beach civic organizations are 
urged to attend. Guest speakers will discuss the 
enforcement of city permits and inspectirais, the 
braiding of builders and dealing with vidations of the 
city's zoning laws. 

Fleet Reserve At Kempsville 

Fleet Reserve Association, Kempsville Branch 99, 8 
p.m., Eagles Lodge, 1061 Newtown Road. 

Thursda y 



Kings Grant Garden Club Meets 

The King's Grant Garden Qub will celebrate it's 20th 
anniversary at the hcHne of Mrs. Waiter Zartman on 
Thursday. Feb. 10 at 10 a.m. A gala celebratioi is 
being planned by past president, Mrs. Carl Herrick. 

The club extends a co-dial invitation to all former 
members to attend this meeting. 

Residents of the King's Oant area interested in 
gardening and artistic arranging among amateurs and 
in becoming an affiliate of a garden club are also invited 
to attend. If interested please call the club preside,nt 
Mrs. Doug Elakenship 340-4173. i 



Fleet Ladies Unit 60 Meets 

Ladies Auxiliary, Fleet Reserve Associaticm, Unit 60, 
8 p.m., 9601 First View St., Nwfdk, For informaticwi, 
call 583-8752. 

Open House For Brandon PTA 

Brandon Junior High Schoc^ PTA open h6use, 7:30 
p.m., at the school. For infn-mation on the prc^ram, 
call 420-9729. 

Eisenhower Wives To Convene 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Enlisted Mens Wives 
Qub. 6:30 p.m.. Naval Station Ship 'n' Shore Wives 
Qub, Norfolk. For information, call 467-9101 or 
463-2436. 

Breezy Point Hosts Officers Wives 

Retired Officers Wives Society. 1 1 :30 p.m.. Commis- 
sioiKd Cheers Mess, Breezy Point. Norfdk. Reserva- 
tions must be made by Feb.7 by calling 481-1034. 

King's Grant Garden Club 

King's Grant Garden dub's 20th aimiversary. 10 
a.m. For information on location, call 340-4173. 



Pavilion Boat Show Continues 

Mid-Atlantic Sports and Boat Show, 6 to 9:30 p.m.. 
Pavilion. Tickets are S2.50 for adults and $1.25 for 
children. 

Tourist Bureau Trade Show 

The Virginia Beach Tourist Bureau will pr»ent its 
annual Trade Show/Market Place on Thursday, Feb. 17 
frcHn noon to 8 p.m. and on Friday. Feb. 18 from 10 
a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Location will be at the Virginia Beach Pavilion, con- 
veniently located at the end of the Virginia Beach Toll 
Road. 

The show will bring exhibitors in contact with buyers 
from Tidewater, Peninsula, Williamsburg and Nag's 
Head areas. 

This year, in addition to buyers from hotels and 
motels, restaurant. «:hool, hospital, shipyard, and 



1 m^ta^ bi^iiMt>are imttted to attend. A chow of this 
magnitude is a first for the Virginia Beach Tourist 
Bureau. 

The many exhibitors will have "Show Specials" 
which will afford institutional buyers the opportunity to 
do their Spring Shopping at substantial savings. Ad- 
mission to the show is free. 

Tidewater Writer's Workshop 

Tidewater Writers' Wwkshop, 7:30 p.m.. Barron 
Black Public Library. For information, call 484-4621. 

Beta Sigma Phi Sorority 

Tidewater City Council of Beta Sigma Phi Sorority. 
7:30 p.m., St. Peter's Episc(^al Church. 

Cape Henry Women's Luncheon 

The Qipe Henry Woman's Club of Virginia Beach 
will hdd its luncheon meeting Thursday, Feb. 10, at 1 1 
a.m. at Tandom's Pine Tree Inn cm Virginia Beach 
Boulevard. 

The guest speaker will be Mary Jane Bond, Visual 
Image Consultant of Color I Association. She will 
demonstrate the use of various color combinations 
which will enhance a basic wardrobe. Mrs. William R. 
Whitehurst is Arts Chairman. 

Art and Craft items submitted by club members will 
be judged by Jean Frye and Jo Ann Kendrick of 
Leggett's Department Store. Mn. George Mullahy is 
Crafts Chairman. 

The music program will be provided by Sue Gasco. 
vocalist, accompanied by Nancy Nelson. Mrs. Kenneth 
Jard is Music Qiairman. 

Hostesses will be Mrs. Qiflon Doxey, Jr. uid Mrs. 
Larane Sale. Table decorations will be provided by Mrs. 
David B. Hill and Mrs. Ralph L Anderson. 

Reservations must be made by Tuesday, Feb. 8, with 
Mrs. George S. Dozier, 340-3192. 

Lynnhaven Junior Band Parents 

Lynnhaven Junior High School Band Parents 
Association, 7:30 p.m., band room. The Board of 
Directors will meet at 6:30 p.m. in the band room. 

Daughters Of Confederacy Meet 

United Daughters of the Confederacy's Cape Henry 
Chapter, 1 1:30a.m., Thalhimers. 

Automotive Service Council ' 

Tidewater Unit of the Automotive Service Council, 
7:45 p.m., Commodwe Country Qub. John Watts of 
the Target Jobs Credit Program will speak. 




K|ds At Windsor Woods 

The Windsor Woods Area Library will present a 
special storytime for children on Friday, Feb. 11 at 3:30 
p.m. 

The program will feature Chinese folklore, shadow 
puppets, and a "taste of Chinese culture." The story- 
time coincides with the Chinese New Year. 

Call 340-1043 to register or for more information. 



Azalea Chapter To Meet 

Azalea Chapter of the Gold Star Wives of America, 
7:30 p.m. Fot information on location, call 460-4977 or 
340-2980. 



Pavilion Boat Show Concludes 

Mid-Atlantic Sports and Boat Show, 6 to 9:30 p.m.. 
Pavilion. Tickets are $2.50 for adults and $1.25 for 
children. 



Law Seminar At Lake Wright 

First Annual Business and Oxnmercial Law Seminar 
for Lawyers in General Practice. 9 a.m., Lake Wright 
Motel. There will be a 165 fee. For information, call 
924-3416 in Charlottesville. 



Easter Seals Art Auction 

Virginia Beach residents will have an opportunity to 
participate in an upcoming art auction to benefit the 
Easter Seals Society. 

Scheduled for Friday, Feb. 11, the auction will uke 
place at the Ramada Inn at 6360 Newtown Road near 
the Norfolk- Virginia Beach border. Marlin Art of New 
York will conduct the auction, which will feature 
artwork of various mediums, including oils, water- 
colors, graphics and sculptrures. 

The works will be previewed at 6 p.m., with the 
auction to fcrflow at 7 p.m. Donations at the door will 
cost $2.50. Wine aftd cheese will be served, and there 
will be doorprizes given away. 

For further information, call the Easter Seals Society 
at 468-3140. or the Ramada Inn at 461-1081. 

Saturda y 

Superfilmshow Is Slated 

Virginia Be«:h Arts Center Superfilmshow. 3 p.m., 
171 1 Arctic Ave. For reservatiwis and information, call 
425-0000. 

Valentine Dance Is Planned 

The Tidewater City Council of Beta Sigma Phi 
Sorority will hold its annual Valentine Dance, Saturday. 
Feb. 12, beginning at 8:30 p.m. at the Virginia Beach 
Civic Center. 

Music will be provided by Society of Seven. 

Members selected as chapter Valentine Quwns are: 



June Rabe of Prn^ter Alpha Alpha; Vivian Dean of — 
Preceptor Alpha Mu; Julie Coppedge of Preceptor 
Alpha Xi; Barbara Gilspn of Xi Alpha Epsilon; Kathy 
Heilman of Xi Alpha Lambda; Patricia Jolley of Xi 
Alpha Mu; Paltie Stillinger of Xi Alpha Rho; Gail 
Maciejewski of Xi Alpha Zeta; Jean James of Xi Beta 
Nu; Ruby Rapp of Beta Alpha; Louise Hayes of Beta 
Mu; Susan Brett of Beta Omega; Rcgina Howard of Eta 
lota; Barbara Ann McAbce of Zeta; and Carol Owens 
of Zeta Kappa. 
Call 499-5609 for more information. 

University Women At Wesleyan 

Virginia Beach Branch of the American Association 
of University Women Annual Luncheon, noon, Virginia 
Wesleyan 03llege'. Reservations must be made by Feb, 
9 and tickets are S5. 

For reservations and information, call 426-7295 or 
340-4040. A 

Kennedy Addresses Blacksburg 

Virgbiia Keruiedy, State President of the American 
Association of University Women and resident of 
Blacbburg, Virginia will address a joint luncheon 
meeting of the Tidewater Area branches of the 
A.A.U.W. at 12 noon Saturday. Feb. 12. at Virginia 
Wesleyan Cdlege. 

Saturday Luncheon Is Planned 

Members from the Norfdk, Virginia Beach, Ports- 
mouth and Chesapeake organizations are hosting the 
Saturday luncheon in the college's Pruden Lounge. 

For further information call Mary Thrasher at > 
423-2215. 

YMCA Running Clinic Planned 

The Virginia Beach YMCA will conduct a running 
clinic on Saturday. Feb. 12 from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. 

The clinic is open to beginnef*r men and women in- . 
terested in lifelong running and fitness. Proper running 
fundamentals and techniques will be discussed. In- 
cluded will be topics on diet, shoe selection and injury 
prevention. 

For registration and additional information about the 
running clinic or other YMCA programs, contact the , 
Virginia Beach YMCA at 499-23 11. 

Art Auction Continues At Ramada 

An art auction to beneHt the Easter Seal Society will 
be held on Saturday, Feb. 12 at the Ramada Inn, 57th 
Street and Oceanfront. 

Preview begins at 7 p.m. Auction begins at 8 p.m. 

Bidding will begin at $25. 

Call 468-3140 for more information. 

Soccer Sign-Ups To Talce Place 

Signups for Spring, 1983 soccer will be held Saturday, 
" FebTil fr-otti Ittli.W.^to 2^.m.' at the Green Run Club- 
house. 

Boys and girls ages five and up are invited to attend. 
Teams will be filled out on a first come, first served 
basis. 

Anyone interested in working with kids in the Green 
Run area and helping them learn to play soccer should 
contact Tim Bradley at 467-1067 after 5 p.m. 

Sunda y 

Dome Hosts Book Sale 

The Friends of the Virginia Beach Public Library will 
sponsor a book sale on Sunday, Feb. 13 at the Dome. 
Hours will be from noon until 5 p.m. Prices start at IOC. 

Questions and donations may be directed to any of 
the area libraries - Bayside, Great Neck, Kempsville, 
Oceanfront and Windsort Woods. 

Monda y 



Rock 'n Roll Jamboree 

Lynn Shores Manor. 340 Lynn Shores Drive, will 
hold a rock 'n roll jamboree on Monday, Feb. 14, from 
6 a.m. to 10 a.m. to benefit the American Heart 
Association. 

For further information, call Lynn Shores Manor at 
340-661 1 or the Heart Association at 857-5961 , 



Court House PTA To Meet 

The next r^uUr meeting of the Court House PTA 
wiU be held Monday, Feb. 14. at 7:30 p.m. in the school 
gym. 

Star-gazers To Meet 

The Virginia Astrological Association will conduct its 
monthly meeting on Monday, Feb. 14, at 8 p.m., at 
Duck Inn. Shore Drive at Lesner Bridge, Virginia 
BMch, Virginia. The Public is invited. For information, 
caU 486-3731. 

Tuesday 

Free Blood Pressure Screenings 

Free blood pressure screenings will he held in the 
main lobby of Virginia Beach General Hospital, 1060 
First Colonial RcMid. on Tuesday, Feb. 15. from 1 to 3 
p.m. and on W«lnesday, Feb. 16, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. 

The public is invitwl to participate in these screenings. 



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4 Virginia Beach Sun, February 9, 1983 



Beach Sports 





Currentl y In Fourth 



Cavaliers Vie For Playoff Spot 



The Cavaliers of Prin- 
cess Anne High School, a 
basketball team that had 
been on a winning five- 
game tear,^ had its wheels 
derailed last weekend by 
the Patriots of First 
Colonial High School, 64- 
59. 

P.A. was unable to th- 
wart the efforts of First 
Colonial's Barry Mitchell, 
who dominated the con- 
test with 31 points. Chad 
Gatlin contributed 1 1 
points to the effort. 



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For Princess Anne, it 
was Kevin Mosely and 
Howard Guidry who 
poured in 21 points 
apiece. Kevin Keverett ad- 
ded anotho- 10 points, but 
it was not oiough. 

Although the Cavs' held 
a 12-5 lead after the flnt 
quarter, the contest was 
knotted at 25 by half time. 
First Colonial raced to a 
45-38 advantage in the 
third period, and hdd on 
in the end for the five- 
point victory. 

"We did alright, but we 
were'xmable to stt^ Mit- 
chell in the second half," 
said P.A. coach Leo An- 
thony. "In the second 
half, we just had a mental 
lapse." 

For Anthony, the 
season's biggest disnp- 
pointment, however, has 
been the loss of star i^yer 
Mike Champion, who was 
declared ineligible to par- 
ticipate because of 
academic deHciendes. 

"When we lost Mike, 
we really lost something," 
said Anthony. "He's so 
big, and he was averaging 
something like 18 points 
per game. 

"But," Anthony con- 
tinued, "the othCT kids 
pulled through. He was 
declared ineligible on a 
Thursday, and then we 



had to play Baj^ide Friday 
night, a game which we 
won handily. Still, losing 
Mike really put a damper 
on tilings." 

Anthony said other 
iriayos have emer^ in 
Champion's lUnence and 
filled his void. "We're 
reaUy counting, on Kevin 
E^^rett now," said An- 
thony. "He is the third 
loiding scorer in Tide- 
water right now. He got 36 
points Against Bayside. 
The only iH'oblem is that 
now with Chamirion out, 
other teams will start 
double-teaming Everett." 

Anothn pla)wr who has 
picked up the slack has 
been Kevin Mmely. "He's 
probably the best 
sophomore in the area," 
said Anthony. "He gave 
us 20 points against 
Bayside. Also, Beep Fitz- 
gerald, our other guard, 
played a lot of pressure 
defense." Other key 
piayen for P.A., Anthony 
noted, have been Howard 
Carr, Darrell Crumble, 
and Eddie Manhall. 

"We've never had a 
losing season here." 
bragged Anthony, the 
school's coach for 14 
years. "We have a lot of 
pride in our basketball 
here. There is just so much 
tradition thal^ the kids are 



good even when they 
shouldn't be. 

"This year for exam- 
ple." Anthony explained, 
"1 didn't think we'd have 
any kind of a team. But, 
the kids came through 
because they are fun- 
damentally sound. Plus, 1 
discipline the hell out of 
them. They know I expect 
a lot out of them, and if 
they can't abide by our 
rules we get rid of them. ' ' 

The Cavaliers record is 
currently 6-5 in the 
District, 8-7 overall, four- 
th place in the Beach 
District. Under Anthony, 
the team has won five city 
championships in a row, 
from 1968 through 1973- 
74. 

Anthony was an Ail- 
American guard at the 
Norfolk Division of 
William and Mary, now 
Old Dominion University, 
where he was a four-year 
letterman from 1958 to 
1961. He led the state in 
scoring throughout 
college, averaging 31 poin- 
ts per game by his senior 
year. He ranked third in 
the nation in scoring in 
1961. Once, against Lyn- 
chbucg College. Anthony 
scored 60 points. Also, 
Anthony won All-state 
honors for his baseball 
skills as a shortstop. 




Eddie Marshall (23) Is guarded by Darr>l Crumble and Peter Dinar- 



do. 



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Two students from Yit- 
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Beth Allred. daughter 
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Virginia Beach, is vto^jl^' 
president of the SodSa 
Work Oub. A senior at 
Ferrum, she also served 
as vice president of last 
year's Social Work Qub. 

Todd Brownell, son of 
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Celtics Are Champs 

The Plaza Celtics 1982 Janlof Boys Qly Scow champions for 1982, with a record 
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Serrano. John Daria, Paul Crist, Greg Hianers, Co«;h Jerry Logue, Chris Goyette, 
Dale Baxter, Chris Stawinsky, Robert Foley, and Fofo Morcia; (front row): Peter 
Zell, Drew Sullivan, Mike Stewart, Mike Bryant„ Brady Post, Mike Yarbrough, 
Mike Mozingo, Kevin Nickolsoa, Ricci Moreia, and Stephan Cunningham. 

Not pictured: Glenn Bingham. Assistant Coach Bob Winn, and Assistant Team 
Mother Fran Post. Coach U^ue said the team's most valnaMe player was John 
Daria, and the UMt improved player was Mike Stewart. 

Superfilmshow Is Scheduled 

"Superfilmshow!" is 
open to all youngsters 
without charge. Advance 
registration is requested. 
Call the Virginia Beach 



MICHAEL F. 

FASANAROrJR. 

Attoraey 
At Law 

461-6121 

S Roger Executive Center 
SUITE 220 

Nurfolk, Va. 23S02 



Arts Center for registra- 
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425-0000. 



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Borough Parade 



A Backwards Window 
At Lyimhaven Mac's 



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You deserve a break today," or so the Mngk 

5. 

Bom more than two decades a«o. McDonald's 



goes 




Ihe I^nnhaven Borough is located in the 
Northeast comer of Yitiinia Bcadi, bordered by 
the Bayside and KempsvUle boroug ha to the west, 
by the Princess Anne Borough to the south, by the 
Atlantic Ocean to the east, and by the Ctesapcake 
Bay to the north. Withbi I^nnhawn hi a small 
corridor regarded as the resort area is the Vli|bria 
Beach Borough. I^rnnhaven is the secood-most 
populated borough in the dty, with an estimated 
75,266 residents accoetUng to a 1M2 estimate, 
lynnhaven has a land area irf 20,772 acres, or 32.5 
miles. 



stands for everything that is supposed to be right 
in America: a relatively good product' £h a 
reasonable price, coupled with courtesy ami 
efficiency. Speed is, and always has been, the 
Icey. 

In an effort to ensure even greater promptness, 
the corporation which gave us gdden arches and 
Mayor McOieese several years ago introduced 
the drive-up window, similar to those employed at 
banks. The customer places his order, and then 
drives up to a window at the facility's exterior, 
leans out the driver's side of his automobile, picks 
up his food and hits the road. 

All but one of Virginia Beach's 1 1 McDonald's 
offers drive-through service. But in the Lynn- 
haven Borough, the McDonald's at Hilltop Square 
Shopping Center has drive-through service of a 
different sort. The traffic flow is designed so that 
the window is located on the passenger side of the 
car as customers drive through. 

"This is really inconvenient," said patron Greg 
Williamson as he approached the window one 
rainy day last wtiek. "It's convenient be- 
cause it's a drive-through, but incon- 
venient because of the way it is situated. * 

"They really should reverse it," added the 
Hampton native. 

"It really is inccmvenient as hell," added the 
Hampton native. 

"It really is inconvenient as hell," said Steve 
Rdlins of Norfolk, as he awaited receipt of his Big 
Mac. "It is not too comfOTtable sitting on the gear 
shift just to get my food." 

"I don't think too much of this window at all,'* 
said Sam Prinz of Virginia Beach, "h is really a 
pain in the butt." 

Why, then, do they continue to patronize the 
establishment? 

"I still like the food a lot." said Debwah Finey 
of Virginia Beach. "This is the nearest Mc- 
Donald's to where I wwk, and 1 absdutely adore 
Chicken McNuggetts. So, it's worth it to me to 
stretch a little bit." 




Virginia Beach Sun, February 9, 1983 5 

Richmond Art Tour Scheduled 



The Virginia Beach Arts 
Centers is sponsoring an 
Art Tour, Tuesday, Feb. 
15, to view the Forbes and*' 
Virginia Faberge collec- 
tions opening this month 
at the Virginia Museum of 
Fine Arts in Richmond. 
The one-day bus trip 
features a guided tour of 
selections from one of the 
world's most extensive 
collections of Russian Im- 
perial creations by master 
jeweler, Peter Carl 
Faberge, jeweler to the 
Czars of Russia. 



Included in the Art 
Tour is lunch in the 
elegant Members' Suite at 
the Virginia Museum. The 
cost, which includes trans- 
portation, admission and 
lunch is S21 and $26 for 
Arts Center members and 
non-members, respec- 
tively. The Art Tour will 
depart the Arts Center 
8:30 a.m. and return that 
afternoon at 4:30 board a 
VIP Charter bus. Advance 
reservations are required 
and may be made by 
calling 42S-0000. 



Molorisis art surprised In rind drive-in on paHcnger Mt. 



Others, thcwgh, were not so certain the effort 
was worthwhile. Barry Wysoki, who drives a 
Dodge stepvan, was unable to lean over and reach 
the window. His next ctnjrse of actiOTJ^ then, was 
to step out into the elements, walk around to the 
other side of his vehicle, and pick up his purchase. 

"This was the first time I ever came here, and I 
didn't know about this window situation," said 
Wysoki. "I'm not too upset, but I think next tirtie, 
I'll just go inside." 

Why did the McDonald's peq?le build their 
window this way? 

"We had to," said Bob Farmer, operations 
manager for the Norfolk and Virginia Beach 
district. "Because of the way the roof was 
designed and because of the positioning of the 
store within the parking \ol, the only way we could 
have a drive-in was to have this reverse drive-in. 
That's what we like to call them." 

Farmer said the first thing employees there do 
iS apologize to the motorists for the difficulties 
presented by the window. "Nine-tenths of the 
cystomers like the convenience of a drive-in 
despite the inconvenience of this particular one," 
he said. 



Five Vie For Library Contract 

Virginia Beach city officials have narrowed the 

field of 39 to five architectural firms which will be 

, interviewed about designing the city's new 

central library. Only one <tf the five is from 

Virginia Beach. 

The Design Cdlaborative, Laszlo Aranyi, 
president, was chosen along vrith two firms from 
northern Virginia and two from Norfolk. 

Because of a death in the family Aranyi ojuld 
not be reached for comment. Richard Fitts, an 
associate, said that The Design Collaborative has 
an "excellent" chance of getting the job 
"because of our qualifications to do libraries and 
our previous experience of working with city 
people." 

Fitts said that four to five architects and staff 
members wwked from 40 to 60 hours on the 
presentation submitted to the city, upon which the 
decisioi to "shortlist" The Design Collaborative 
was made.' 

Representatives fi^om the firm will have 90 
minutes on Tuesday. Feb. 22 to make their final 
presentation to the city on the library. 

City Councilman Jack Jeimings, in whose 
borough the library will be located, said he wished 
more Virginia Beach architectural firnu had been 
selected about designing the Ubrary. 

"1 can't understand why only one firm from 
Virginia Beach was selected," Jennings said. 
"Why not select three to four Virginia Beach finr 
and let them coordinate with each other? u. 
Norfdk the firms team up. Why not let Virginia 
Beach firms jdn together? He added, "our home 
folks are not xettina their fair share." 



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6 Virginia Beach Sun. February 9, 1983 



REVCO COUPON 
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Virginia Ucach Sun, I cbruary 9, 1983 7 




Wcsleyan 
To Host 
Israeli 



, • • 



Pianist 



^ Snuff Hits Richmond 

Robbie House, left, and Chuck Lareon, members of Virginia Beach band, 
Snuff, in concert recently at Richmond's Crazy Horse nightclub. The band, 
which opened Tuesday for the Marshall Tucker Band at Chrysler Hall, is put- 
ting the final touches on its new album. According to bass player Scott 
Trabue, the first single will be called '^United Or Divided." 



Daniel Adni, a ycHUig 
Israeli pianist who has 
won international ac- 
claim, will present a con- 
cert at Virginia Wesleyan 
College on Feb. 11 at 8 
p.m. in the Hofheimer 
Theater. He will also give 
a concert/lecture on Thur- 
sday, Feb. 10. at 1 1 a.m. 
in Room 9 of the Fine Arts 
Center. The concerts, 
part of the Doughterty 
Visiting Artists Series, are 
free and open to the 
public. Reservations 
should be made by calling 
the college at 461-3232. 

His program on Friday, 
Feb. 11, will include 
works by Debussy (Pour le 
piano and L'lslc joyeusc), 
Greig (Sonata in E minor. 
Opus 7), Chopin (Fan- 
taisie in F minor. Opus 49) 
and Liszt (Six Grand 
Etudes after Paganini). 




City workers inspect a new diesel bus. 



'A Very Nice Vehicle': Fletcher 



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DAR Salutes Washington 

The Regents Chapter of the Tidewater Chapters of 
the Virginia Daughters of the American Revolution will 
celebrate George Washington's 251st birthday at its 
annual lunchecm <»i Saturday, Feb. 29. 

The luncheon will be held at the Sheraton Beadi 
Hotel, 36th Street and the oceanfront at noon. 

William Eley will be the guest speaker. His topic will 
be "Rediscovering George Washington." 

Call 397-9223 for mwe informati<ni. 




Southern States 



Members of the 
Virginia Beach School 
Board were recently taken 
for a ride. 

For approximately 10 
minutes, five of the city's 
11 board members along 
with Superintendent E. E. 
Brickell were chauff cured 
around town in one of the 
school system's 27 new 
diesel-powered buses. "1 
like this," said at-large 
member James N. Flet- 
cher. "It's a very nice 
vehicle." Added the Rev. 
B. G. Campbell, the Kem- 
psville representative: 
"These--diesel buses really 
aren't , any louder than 
gasoline buses." 

They may not be louder 



than the other buses, but 
they are more efficient, 
according to J. Warren 
Littleton, director of tran- 
sportation for the school 
system. "In the first week 
of operation we have 
found a 60 percent in- 
crease in the miles per 
gallon," he said. 
"Although diesel buses 
are considerably more ex- 
pensive, they are expected 
to last an average of five 
years longer. Couple that 
with the mileage and these 
buses will pay for them- 
selves over time." 

According to^ Joe 
Lowenthal, public infor- 
mation director for the 
school system, each of the 



new buses cost "around 
$28,500," which is about 
$4,000 more than gasohne 
buses, he said. The total 
number of school buses in 
Virginia Beach is 348, 
some of which are 1 3 years 
old and are being 
replaced. 

Littleton said school 
buses currently service 997 
routes, transporting 
41,452 school children two 
times per day. In the cour- 
se of a year, he said, the 
buses will traverse 
2,658.000 miles through 
the city. V 

Brickell lauded the 
members of the school 
system's maintenance 
staff keeping the fleet of 



vehicles in running order. 
"They are always cour- 
teous and cooperative," 
he said. Brickell /also 
praised the city's bus 
drivers, who he estimated 
make 10,000 stops per 
day. 

Other school board 
members in attendance in 
eluded Lynnhaven 
representative John A. 
Fahey, Blackwater 
representative Laura M. 
Tebault, and Pungo 
representative Susan 
Flanigan. Board members 
next month will tour the 
school system's Center for 
Effective Learning. 



NOTICE of Annual Meetinq I Gunther, Roder Marry 



The Annual Meeting of the Members Of 
SDUlhern States Chesapeake Association 

Chesapeake, Virginia 

Will Ucllcid: Ihursday, Iebruary24, IVh.^ 

Al InUiaii kivcr Junior High Sch»H»l 

Business Meeting al 7:30 p.m. 

I he agenda includes reports on Southern States Cwperalive, 

liical opcralions and iht eleclion of Dircelors and the FHA 

conimillcc. 1,^ ,,,j^., of (Ik- Hoard lift )iuiU>rs ,, 

C lydeli. lenliess, Munagct 
Assislunl Secretary 



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If You'd Just Come 
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THIS WEEK^S SPECIALS~| 



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^ HOT CHILI With Crackers ...79 



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COKE .....35 

<^16 0Z. NR. 

t^ GOOD & FAST 

PIZZA 79 

^ GRADE A 

LARGE EGGS ...... .79 

PET 
MILK 

»2.19 



3 LOCATIONS 



GREAT BRIDGE 

Corner Cedar Kuiid And Balllefield Blvd. 
482-5181 

CHURCHLAND 

Corner High Street And Tyre Neck Road 
483-4825 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

Comer Rosemont And Holland Road 
463-0602 






GAS UP • WASH THE CAR 



Join Our Coffee Club 

Buy a mug filled with coffee for 
only 89C to join 

MEMBERS SPECIAL 

IhUMonlbOMly 

^ BUY A REFILL CUP AND GET 

y YOUR FREE DONUT 

• SHOP AND SAVE TOO! 



Claudia Markham Gunther and Carlton Blake Rader, 
the son of Virginia Beach residents Mr. and Mrs. Ulake 
H. Rader, were recently married al Second Presb>terian 
Church, Norfolk. The double ring ceremony was per- 
formed by the Reverend H. L. Wilsoii, Jr. 

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Vernon 
Bernard Markham Jr. of Newport News. She is the 
granddaughter of Vernon B. Markham of Newport 
News and the late Mrs. Markham and the late Mr. and 
Mrs. Claude W. Parker of Seaford. 

The bridegroom is the grandson of Mrs. Clara White 
of Mathews and the late Mr. White, 
f Mrs. Gail S. Hart of Hampton was matron of honor. 
' Mr. Blake H. Rader was his son's best man. The 
ushers were Larry Murphy of Chesapeake and Larry 
Hammonds of Norfolk . 

Mrs. Randolph Smith of Hampton was mistress of 
ceremonies. 
A reception was held at the Fort Monroe Officer;^ 

Club. 

Mrs. Rader graduated from Newport News High 
School and the Riverside School of Practical Nursing, 
Newport News. She attended Chowan College, Mur- 
frcesboro, North Carolina, and is employed as a 
librarian for the Daily Press Inc., Hampton Bureau. 

Mr. Rader graduated from First Colonial High 
School in Virginia Beach and Old Dominion University 
in Norfolk. Mr. Rader is certified public accountant and 
is employed as the comptroller for a local corporation. 

After a wedding trip to The Homestead, the couple 
will reside in Newport News. 



Bankers 
Address 
Chamber 
Members 

The Virginia Beach 
Chamber of Commerce's 
Small Business Council 
recently hosted a seminar 
for Beach businessmen en- 
titled, "Borrowing-The 
Secret of Getting the Loan 
You Want." Panel mem- 
bers for the program in 
eluded 13 experts in the 
field, 1 1 of them represen- 
ting Virginia Beach banks. 

Topic questions in- 
cluded: what does a len- 
ding institution look for in 
my business; how to ap- 
proach a lender with a 
loan request; what are the 
best and worst conditions 
for borrowing; do 1 need 
financial statements; will 1 
need collateral; what do I 
do if I am turned down; 
and how do 1 apply for 
SBA loan. 

"Character is the first 
credential we look at," 
said Charles Riggs, senior 
vice president of the 
Virginia Beach Bank of 
Conunerce. "Many fac- 
tors go into the loan 
maker's decision to 

The average depth of the 
Padfk is more than two 
and a half miles. 




Claudia Markham Gunlher Rader 




Virginia Beach bankers discussed loans with businessmen. 



require capital: net worth 
of company, et worth of 
principles, existing debt, 
impact of new debt on 
cash flow. In most cases, 
il is not any one of these 
but an evaluation of all 
the facts. 

"Despite all of these 
security measures, charac- 
ter is still the top creden- 
tial," he added. "Security 
is not an adequate sub- 
stitute for character." 

Most people turned 
down for loans exhibit a 
defensive reaction, said 
Frank Gilmore, vice 
president for Virginia 
National Bank. "A good 
banker is able to turn a 
turn-down into sonrething 



positive for the customer. 
It is important for the 
customer to listen to the 
banker at that point. He is 
able to help direct him 
towards other means of 
financing. 

"People should not 
take being turned down 
personally," he added. 

Other panel members 
for the program included: 
Henry Ambrose, assistant 
vice president. Dominion 
National Bank; George 
Rice vice president, 
United Virginia Bank; 
Gary Jones. vice 
president, Bank of 
Virginia Beach; William 
Morgan, vice president, 
'First Virginia Bank; Barry 



Mathias, assistant vice 
president, Bank of 
Virginia; Wayne Hum- 
phreys, assistant vice 
president, Peoples Bank; 
Andy Davies, vice 
president, First and Mer- 
chants; Andrew Roger- 
son, vice president, Cen- 
tral Fidelity Bank; James 
Crouch, senior vice 
president, Citizens Trust 
Bank; William Robertson, 
U.S. Credit Corporation; 
and Gene Sullivan, Chiel 
of Finance Division, Small 
Business Administration, 
Richmond office. 

Approximately 200 
people were in attendance 
for the two and one-half 
hour seminar. 



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8 Virginia Beach Sun, February 9, 1983 





SUNrihes 



By BcMk Ubrariaa Carolyn Caywood 




_„ Recognized at the openiBg ceremonies of Vocational Educadon Week, and presented certificates by Virginia 
Beach City Councilman Rol>ert G. Jones, left to right, are: Bill Hamilton, acting president of Vocational Technical 
Center's chapter of Future Farmer's of America, son of Mr. and Mrs. Truman Hamilton; Mark Anthony, vice 
president of (he Kempsville High School chapter of Future Business Leaders of America, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Francis C. Widmer; Mrs. Sharon McCann, Vocational Technical Center, president of (he Virginia Beach Chapter 
of Health Occupations Student Association. Her husband is Gerald T. McCann; Kim Rivenbark, president of the 
First Colonial High School chapter of Future Homeraakeis of America/Home Economics Related Occupation 
Federation. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Rivenbark; Cathy Abourjilie, PrinceM,Anne High 
School, president of the Tidewater Regional Industrial Arts Student Association, representing (he American in- 
dustrial Arts Student Association. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Abourjilie; Susan WUker, repreilh- 
ting Nancy White, Bayside Hfgh School chapter of Distributive Education Clubs of America, district vice presi<tent 
of Virginia DECA. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Larry W. Brickhouse. Ray Standi, vice president of the, 
Career Development Center Vocational Industrial Clubs of America, District I. He's the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
James Edward Standi. R. WiUam Grahan Is at Ibc MkrofifeoM 






Chinese New Year 
Is This Weekend 

;■ i,,At^ lOidOO Viiiinians will welawie the New Year 
"Suhaay^*eb. 13. The wecic l«ig celebraticm will usher 
in the yem^pf the Pig for people of Chinese ancestry 
throughouJf'the w«ld. This h(4iday has been celebrated 
fw over* 5.,{Xfe years on the first of the new mora after 
the sun eMterithe constellation Aquarius. The day shifts 
fiXKn year to year but always occurs in late January or 
eafly February, 

^Reparations tor the New Year begin early. 

Traditionally, no cooking was done over the holidays 

and^^ops were closed. The preceeding weeks were 

ognipied^with house cleaning and making special treats 

aftd decorations, the hcrfidays themselves were busy 

ily visits and entertainments like the lion 

js^ar many area Chinese restaurants will be 

If Ais tradititMi. Beach residents who want to 

,|jbi( the lion dance should call local restaurants for date 

fiiatime. 

tFor a detailed description of the most imp<»-tant 



V— rt 



By 

Earnedil 

Spindelilus 





, - 1 

Vocational Ed. Week U 

Kicks Off At Lynnhaveli sh™',i^°I!ll' 




Neural Healing 



Vocational Education 
Week in Virginia Beach 
recently kicked off with 
opening ceremonies at 
Lynnhaven Mall. 

The ceremony included 
an overview of vocational 
education and Vocational 
Education Week; in- 
troduction of students/ad- 
visors representing 
vocational student 
organizations; proclam- 
ation of Vooitienal 
Education Week; presen- 
tation of proclamation to 
respective personnel and 
student representatives; 
presentation of special 
certificates; and ribbon 
cutting ceremony. 

Participants at the 
ceremony included Betsy 
Vaibracht, marketing 



director at Lynnhaven 
Mall; Virginia Beach City 
Council members Robert 
G. Jones and Meyera 
Oberndorf; Frank E. 
Taylor, General Advisory 
Council for Vocational 
Education; Walter N. 
Carroll, assistant superin- 
tendent, Virginia Beach 
Public School System; 
Patricia L. House, direc- 
tor of supervisory ser- 
vices; Tamara L. Bowycr, 
siipe^YJsor of home 
economics; Paul D. Har- 
per, chairperson of 
Vocational Education 
Week, and masonry in- 
structor. Career Develop- 
ment Center; and R. 
William Graham; chief 
placement specialist. 
The theme of the week 



is "An Investment In 
People." 

All Virginia Beach 
public schools are 
represented at the mall. 

Activities planned for 
the week include the 
opening ceremonies; 
brochures; news articles; 
mayor's proclamation; 
report and sample displays 
to the School Board; 
marquees; television and 
radio coverage; open 
houses; assembly 
programs; poster contest; 
displays; exhibits; an- 
nouncement over the 
schools' public address 
systems; letters mailed to 
local organizations and 
parents; and events within 
each school. 

The Virginia Beach City 




Public ASc^boj(s off tit 
vocational ^tMitioir^ jTit 
eight prog^iuff areas' 
Vocational e4uc 
classes represent^ 
ferent occupattt^l} 
Vocational educaT 
serve 15,328 studcnfs-'^^ 
during the 1982-83 school 
year. Vocationa 
education „pj[p||am 
ploys 2^0; t 
Vocational educHy^Rl 

fiurses aretSm^l^nrQbt 
nior high schools; seven 
senior high schools, one 
vocational teciu^c^cem^. 
and the Career^ Develop- 
ment Center.' ' ' 

For more infoitnafitAL 
call 499-7686. All exhit^i 
and displays Will 
available for viewing at 
Lynnhaven Mail. 





t 




He Mali's atrium was the site for the cveut. 



One of the fastest growing phenomena occuring in 
VftjHiiia Beach tOd«y is the art of natural healing, often 
ds^^Uie guidance from a psychic. One very popular 
£(HtirciaPinformatiCHi in this field are the readings from 
Bf^af Cayce. Here, you can find knowledge for 
'^t^iry:^ease from ^thritis to X-ray burns. 
' ^: iSxmt every type are mentioned', with 
iAed mses relating their cures. Throughout the 
two ^Arithak Tve studied the readings, one of the 
ma^t„^ci(IW^ things I've found is the simplicity in 
whichVthe diseases were treated. Today, we hear of 
doctors developing complicated and expensive drugs to 
tir^ftt these illnesses, often with devastating side 
. But from the pschic courses, with many others 
i^Cgyce's, simple, antural cures are given with 
root94hat'are often found in antiquity. 

ginia Beach, one of the most commoi ailments 
found is sunburn, which we usually treat with 
r^pensive creams and oils. But in the Cayce readings, 
the simple Spirits of Campho- is suggested. Colic, a 
painful common disorder of babies, is often easily 
treated With nothing but Saffron Tea which wo-ks on 
the child's digestive tract. Everyday it seems like 
someone we know complains about some debilating 
disease such as arthritis. Expensive and yet ineff^tive 
drugs are usually recommended. Within the Cayce 
readings, a simple compound is suggested utilizing 
easily obtained oils such as mineral, dive, peanut, 
landin, sassafras and pine needle. People for years 
have been using this formula as a rubdown with 
^successf^ll results. 

A widely misunderstood coicepticm of healing is that 
in (x-der to treat the illness, one needs to treat the 
symptoms. In the readings from psychic channels, we 
find that treating the cause, often rooted in the 
subconscious, is where modem day medicine is lacking. 
Oie of the oxnmon causes mentioned in the readings 
for most diseases is the diet. In the United States, our 
diets consist mainly of processed foods rich in sugars, 
salt and inwganic chemicals. After a certain period of 
time, the body's ability to eliminate these impurities 
W'^r &t)d poisons begin to accumulate in the tissues. 
Ttih eventually results in disease, with it's location 
iiep^nding upon where the toxins have been stored. 
, With just a little study, c«e can find in almost every 
I»ychic reading a diet of fresh fruits and vegetables 



Oberndorf 
Gives Up On 
Suit Against 
Heischober 

City Councilwoman 
Meyera E. Oberndorf said 
recently she has accepted 
an apology from council 
colleague Harold R. 
Heischober and, con- 
sequently, will drop her 
slander suit against him. 

Heischot«r last summer 
was quoted in The Ledger- 
Star as referring to Obern- 
dorf and other members 
of Council who defeated 
him in his bid to b«:ome 
mayor as "prostitutes" 
who "made a deal." 

Oberndorf responded 
by Filing suit for $150,000. 

Both are considered 
poienttal Republican Par- 
ty candidates for a new 
state Senate seat ^to be 
voted upon iii November. 
The resolution reached 
between Oberndorf and 
Heischober was or- 
chestrated by several local 
Republican Party leaders, 
including Common- 
wealth's Attorney Paul A. 
Sciortino, 



Sun Subscription Discount 
For Beach Senior Citizens 




Virginia Beach Sun subscriptions for 
Virginia Beach residents 60 years or older 
may be purchased for $6 for one year, or 
$9 for two y^s. A regular one-year sub- 
scription is $9; two years is $12. To sub- 
scribe to The Virginia Beach Sun, Virginia 
Beach's community newspaper for 57 
years, call 486-3430 or mail check to The 
Virginia Beach Sun, 138 S. Rosemont 
Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 



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cost of single ad $ 

Number times to run 
Amount enclosed $ _ 



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Zip. 



All ClASSIWO ODSW U W WTIICOPA P DMg TOST Mn THE WJCINIA BEACH SUN 

Ryr hflp Witt ymir ^3^m^ ad, iHease call 547*4571 . 



Chinese holiday, read Hou-tien Cheng's "The Chinese 
New Year." TTiis lovely little book Is exquisitely 
illflstrafea wittrsfllr^ettei papercuts, a classic chines* 
art fOTm. Two well-known picture books for younf 
childre*'«l$o describe the hc^iday. Thomas Handfath's 
"Mel tf Vwts The Fair on New Year's Eve In Chir|i 
while Leo;ipoliti's "Moy Moy" celebrates in Uf 

Angeles, » ^ ^ ^,| 

In ht*»OT'of the occasion the Virginia Beach Publ|: 
Library w presenting a special storytime, featuring Oil 
Scout Jtaop 479, for children in the primary grades .It 
will fe*iure thpfolklore of China, shadow puppets, ai|l 
a taste (rfChifi#se culture. To register for this progra|i 
call 34*1043 W stop in at Windsor Woods Ar^ 
Library, 3612 South Plaza Trail. The storytime will lie 
hridat'|s30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 11. J 

Therei*! be a display of bijsto on various aspects m 
Chinese culture throughout the week. Younger reade|^ 
will be faqblfted by "High On A Hill, A Book (f 
Chinese RicMifs" by Ed Young and "Chinese Writing" l^ 
Diane Wc|f. Teenager's may wish to broaden th^ 
understaadfng of other cultures by reading "Sefi 
Caass" ijy Lawrence Yep. The Newbery Award winnii* 
"Young Fu Of The Upper Yangtze" by Elizabeth Lewi 
has Icmg been a good tntroductiai to China. Tw|) 
acc(Hints of Euc^alis living in China in the early paft 
of the cer^ury fotman exciti^ constract. "Big Tig# 
And Chriitiaii^'%Prttz Muhlenweg was translatejl 
from the German thirty years ago while Jean Frit% 
"Homesick" was published just last year, yet both tell 
what it was like, to be a missionary's child while Chiip 
was in political turmoil. ; 

Take this opportunity to learn more about this cultuic 
heritage and be swre to wish your friends Bai-nien or 

Happy New Year. ; 

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recommended. This is due to their pure and naturil 

state and also their tendency to purge the body ^f 

excessive toxins. Most of all though, we're tdd to 

eliminate from our diets foods which contain too much 

iR^hite sugar, flour and most of the red rncats as thesje 

produce an over-abundance of acids within our bodies.: 

For those who wish to stjudy the Cayce readings, the 
Association for Research and Enlightenment's 
Library is open to the general public. The famuUts 
suggested in the Cayce readings can be found prepared 
available. '< 

Today, mwe than ever, we need to start re-evaluat- 
ing our way viewing illness and health, and turn back to 
a natural styte of living where youth isn't envied, but 
found in every(me, and where dd-age and death are the 
exceptions. 



Coronary Risk Factor 
Screening Scheduled 



A Coronary Risk Factor 
Screening program will be 
held on Sunday, Feb. 13, 
from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 
at Virginia Beach General 
Hospital (1060 First 
Coloiiial Road. Virginia 
Beach). ^Jfai * biitou « v 
:Tlie' ScKBWBgiv^f j«fe,ijik' 
the public, offers ^an 
evaluation including the 
participant's height, 
weight, and blood 
pressure; a bicycle exercise 
test to determine fitness 
level; and blood tests for 
triglycerides, blood sugar, 
and cholesterol. In ad- 
dition, a video tape 
presentation on coronary 
risk factors (obesity, 
smoking, high cholesterol 
diet, lack of exercise, 
stress, diabetes, and 
heredity) will be shown. 



Results of 



th 

evaluations will be,sent to 
both the participants and 
their family physicians. 

Since space is limited; 
pre-registration is 
required. Call 481-818B 
'Monday through Friday 
:b<3ween 8 a.m. and 5:30 
p.m. to pre-register. The 
blood test portion of the 
screening requires fasting 
for 12 hours prior to the 
actual screening. One 
hour should be allowed to 
complete .the entire 
program. ^ 



RUBBER 




USE THIS FORM 
TO SUBSCRIBE TO ' 

THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 
138 ROSEMONT ROAD 

Virginia Beach, Va., 23452 

Call Robin or Paula at 547-4571 
NAME 



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ADDRESS. 

CITY 

STATE 

ZIP 



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PHONE 



WITHIN TIDEWATER AREA 

DOne year $9.00 
DTwo years $15.00 

Only 17C An Issue! 
ALL OTHER AREA 

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PLEASE CHECK HERE if this is 
a new subscription. D 
PLEASE CHECK HERE if you 
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BEACH SUN and are renewing 
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«« 




Virginia Beach Sun. February 9. 1983 9 



rOIti 



Thomas A. Barton, Jr. 

2717 Virginia- Beach Boulevard 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23452 

486-2717 

Chairman - PAVA B District 

1981 - 1982 



A SCOUT IS COUR TEOUS 



IfENWICgSJ 



nancya fUnlng 
calarinf Manatar 
pkeac4lfr«M] 




RESTAURANT 
AND TAVERN 



4831 n. wiuhdtKk road • pambraka aquara ihoppinc center, 
viifinia baach, viifinia 234U 

A SCOUT IS KIND 



H 



The 
'f'^OficnDoor 

Chapel 



(804) 340-1441 



Ash Away Chimney Sweeps 

ISO Thalia Trace 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23452 

463-7662 

Roland Leggett 
Fast Service 
Olds Fashioned 
Courtesy 



>^$!S3S'^| 



756 Timberlakc Shopping Center 

Holland Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 

49S-2085 



A SCOUT IS HELPFUL 



A SCOUT IS FRIENDL Y 



ttw% 



Rednnond, Amundsen & Rice 
Advertising Agency. Inc 

P,O.Box62506 

161 Business Park Drive 

Virginia BeacK VA 23462 



Pyle Realty 

4652 Haygood Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23455 

460-1777 



A SCOUT IS TRUSTWORTHY 



A SCOUT IS LOYAL 



Commonwealth College 

2924 North Lynnhaven Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23452 

3404)222 

Joe Kennedy 



Charles M. Ewing, D.P.M. 

Podiatrist - Foot Specialist 

Sports Medicine, Surgery & 

General Foot Care 

5301 Providence Road 

Suite 80 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23464 

495-1277 

Day. e«ti*« ud taM^iir Monriag Hoon AvtiMk 



Catch 
The 



What is the spirit of Scouting? For leaders, the spirit of Scouting is selfless service to young 
people and to the community and nation. For alumni, it is a fond memory of youth. To the 
general pubUc, it is the Scout uniform, the Scout sign, and thousands upon thousands of Good 
Turns To the present members, both youth and adult, it is the glow one feels when uniformed 
Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts carry the U.S. flag in a parade. It is Explorers learmng about 
careen as a way to choosing their life's work. 

What is the spirit of Scouting, as it might be embodied during the 1983 anniversary year? It 
can be felt at a meeting of volunteers planning a Scout show, a training course, or mobihzmg 
resources to organize additional units. It is there, where people from all walks of life work 
together outUning the details of cap inspection, the details of the Explorer Olympics, or par- 
ticipation in the World Scout Jamboree. It is felt among career Scouters as they make long- 
Qj^r\^ I /f f1 O" range plans to serve more youth with a better program through community organizations. 
/3 C C/ M 1 1 t^K The meaning Scouting has for an individual is as varied as there are people. And it all comes 

to head, annually, during the anniversary week which celebrates the founding of the movement 
in this country--on February 8, 1910. ■ c u -ii a 

The 1983 Scouting Anniversary Week program, February 6-12, is the celebration of the 73rd 
anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America. It is an event with great significance to youth mem- 
bers. Scouting units, districts, councils, and the national organization. It involves all Cub 
Scouts, Boy Scouts, Explorers, and adult leaders. 



Spirit 



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3177 Va. Beach Blvd., Va. Beacii, Va., 23452 

rslNDAY TIESUAY 

Sundi)' School 9: IS AM Bible Stud) 10:00 AM 

Worship Service 8:00 AM 

.... 10:30 AM WEDNESDAY 

Praise Service 6:30 PM Mid-week Service .... '00 PM 



A SCOUT IS OBEDIENT 



^^r^i 



GaryKimnach 

6401 Virginia Beach Boulevard 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23502 

461-6401 



A SCOUT IS CHEERFUL 



Smith & Williams 
Funeral Home 

818 Norview Avenue 
Norfolk, Virginia 23509 

857-5353 



A SCOUT IS THRIFTY 






MN myiJA TION TO TIDEWA TER'S 
TOTAL-FAMILY CHUKCH 

INDIAN RIVER 

BAPTIST CHURCH 

1 600 L aur^l A V9ttu9 
C/iesapealte, Va., 23325 

Phate W. McSwain, Jr, Pastor 

424-5700 



A SCOUT IS BRAVE 



First & Merchants 
National Bank 

Norfolk, Virginia 23510 
466-5116 



A SCOUT IS CLEAN 



Howard A. Mendelsohn, 
D.D.S. 

6095 Indian River Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23464 

424-1976 



A SCOUT IS REVERENT 



Kempsville Meadows Golf 
& Country Club 

4840 Princess Anne Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

495-1889 



Scouts of Tidewater • We Salute You! 



mmmammmmm&mmmmm 



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10 Virginia Beach Sun, February 9, 1983 



♦ . 

Virsinia Beach Business & Real Estate Hews 




February 15 



SS Cooperative 

Sets Regional 
Meeting 



Pklured left to ilgM; L.W. KIcwtr, Arckilecl of Morrisette, Cederquist, 
and BoBduraat ud AvodMo, Rofcr E. Miles, Rsychairtk Associates Ad- 
minislralor. Dr. LawicMe A. Icracrl, Jr.. I>rcsldeiil of PAT and Willis W. 
Sykes, HI, Project MuHfcr, W.B. Mcfcditk II, Ik. 



PAT Expansion 



Psychiatric Assocktes 
Tidewater has annoinced 
the groundbreaking for a 
new office addition at 
8981 First Coionial Road, 
Virginia Beach. Dr. Law- 
rence A. Bemert, Jr., 
President and Roger E. 
Miles, Administrator, 
niade the joint announce- 
ment. They said the new- 
est office will allow for 
further expansion to meet 
the community's needs. 

There are nine other 



I^ychiatric Associates 
locations throughout Tide- 
water. TTie staff of PAT 
now boused at the 1100 
First Colonial Road loca- 
tion, will move in its entir- 
ety to the new addition 
upon its completion. Dr. 
James F. Griswoid, Laura 
O. Rc^rto and Lewis R. 
Nfikeseil, with offices now 
on Kempsvine Road, will 
also transfer to the new 
building. 

Hie office area will be 
7,800 square feet and 



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Customized 
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A Local Corporation 

Economical Computer Services 

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Mannscri];^s/T1wsU • General Correspondence 

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SnoaU BuaA«s Accounting 
GcQCTal Le£teer*Receh^fe*PayaUes 
AuKmi^Bd^vtA 

*Invaitory Maw^rment* 
*Ci«oaH2ed "htanriw-Oundiii^"* 

"Whatif'...^)readshcets 

Support For Professionals 

•Sdiethile Manner* 
•Auumiatcd "Ex-Dtfe" and Re<:(Mttact TkUos* 



CalMlo 



547-5441 



includes more spacious 
areas for group meetings, 
audio visuals and waiting 
rooms. Contractor for the 
facility is W.B. Meredith 
U, Inc., and Willis W. 
Sykes, 111 is project mana- 
ger. The architect for the 
new building is LW. 
Kliewer of Morrisette, 
Cederquist and Bondu- 
rant & Associates of Nor- 
folk. 

Opening is projected for 
June 6 of this year. 



Members of Southern 
States Cooperative's local 
board and committee 
members, agricultural 
workers and retail 
managers will attend a 
regional board meeting in 
Franklin, VA, on 
February IS. The session 
will be held at Franklin 
Baptist Church and 
registration will begin at 9 
a.m. 

Also attending the 
meeting will be a number 
of guest young fanners 
from this area. 

A total of 37 of these 
regional meetings will be 
held by Southern Statu 
over a five-state area. The 
cooperative serves farmer- 
members who live in 
Virginia, West Virginia, 
Maryland, - Delaware 
and Kentucky and who 
hold a total of 336,833 
memberships in the 
organization. 

J. Marvin Padgett of 
Waverly, VA, a member 
of the 15-man board of 



Moskowitz 
Named To 
PAT Post 



Cardyn Moskowitz has been named Community 
Relations Coordinator fa- I^ychiatric Associates of 
Tidewater. 

A native of b^ington. New Jersey, Ms. Moskowitz 
received her IK and Masters Degrees from the Sute 
University of New York at Buffalo. 

Her intemshii» in social work were at Children's 
Hospitd and Child and Family Servi(x, also in Buffiolo. 
Her post graduate work experience was at Jewish 
Family Service, Norfolk, and most recently Tidewater 
Psychiatric Institute, Norfdk. 

As Community Relations Coordinator, Ms. Mosko- 
witz will be heading the referral development liason 
with social service and mental health organization. She 
will also maintain close ties with the Tidewater 
Community in raising general awareness of mental 
health. Ms. Moskowitz, a licensed clinical social 
worker, will continue her pr&cti(% of individual, group, 
marital and family therapy. 

Psychiatric Associates of Tidewater has nine loca- 
tions througlteut^ Tidewater. 



PUT BUYERS 

FROM AROUND 

THE COUNTRY 

AT YOUR 

DOORSTEP^ 




OnliqjL, 




s 



METRO 

1341 S. Military Hwy. 
Chesapeake. Va. 

mOBPBVDIVTCr OWVBO 
AMP OPllATlll. 



directors will preside at 
the meeting. Padgett 
represents the 

cooperative's members in 
eastern Virginia and was 
elected to the board in 
1982. 

Feature at the session 
will be a presentation en- 
titled "Gearing Retail to 
Operating in the 80's" to 
be presented by James E. 
Coleman, director. Mer- 
chandising for the 
coop^titive. Plus a finan- 
cial reptirt for the co-op's 
first 6 months of the fiscal 
year. 

There will also be a 
video tape personal 
message to the session 
from Secretary of 
Agriculture, John Block, 
plus a videotape dialogue 
between Gene A. James, 
the co-op's director of 
Economic Research and 
Planning. They will 
discuss the future Of 
agriculture and the 
operation of cooperatives 
in the environment of the 
future. 

Following a discussion 
period the session will ad- 
journ. 

Expected to attend the 
meeting are: Clyde G. 
Fentress, manager of 
Southern States 

Chesapeake Association 
and local board members. 



Alex C. Brown, R. David 
Flanagan, Donald H. 
Horsley, Robert P. 
Vaughan, Virginia B«Kh; 
C.E. Gaskins, Suffolk; 
G.C. Nicholas, Jr., 
Richard V. spruill, 
Chesapeake. 

Also attending will be 
William B. Swain, 
manager of Southern 
States Chesapeake 
Petroleum Service and 
local board members, 
Hersey G. Cartwrig^t, 
M.A. Zydron, Paul 
Zydron, Jr., Chesi4>eake; 
William H. Gilbert, J. 
Stuart Ives, Earl M. 
Tebault, Virginia Beach. 



People's Bank 
Of Chesapeake 
Announces IRA 
Seminar 



People's Bank of 
Chesapeake will hold their 
first IRA Semituu- (In- 
dividual Retirement Ac- 
count) Thursday, 
February 17th at their 
Greenbriar location. Bat- 
tlefield Boulevard and 
Volvo Parkway, 7:30 p.m. 
Townsend Oast, 

{^resident, made the an- 
nouncement today. 

According to Oast, 
"there are those in our 
community who have not 
had an opportunity to get 
a first hand look at the 
advantages offered by this 
type of savings plan. We 
are looking forward to 
clarifying many of the 



unanswered questions 
people have about IRAs as 
well as point out the tax 
advantages offered." 

Jack Gibson, Com- 
ptroller of the bank, will 
head the seminar. He is 
regarded as an expert in 
the IRA field with 
previous expertise in ac- 
counting. The seminar will 
be free of charge and in- 
cludes a question and an- 
swer period f«jlowing a 
brief explanation^ of In- 
divudual Retirement Ac- 
counts. Although reser- 
vations are not required, 
the public is encouraged to 
come early for assured 
seating. 



VA Beach Federal 
Names Knight 



Thomas W. Knight has 
been promoted to Senior 
VjM-ftesident/Chief 
Operating Officer for 
Virginia Beach Federal 
Savings and Loan 
Association. The announ- 
cement was made today 
by William L. Owens, 
president. 

Knight hs been with the 
firm since 1975, most 
recently as a Vice- 
Pre»dent. In his new 
capacity he wiU assist the 
President in the ovtfall 
administration of the 



Association with direct 
responsibility for lending, 
savings, accounting, and 
administration. In the ab- 
sence of the Chief 
Executive Officer, Knight 
will act in his place. 

Knight and his family 
reside in Virginia Beach. 

Virginia Beach Federal 
Savings and Loan has five 
area branches. The 
Association has increased 
savings more than 3S07» 
during the past 18 months, 
and is nationaUy ranked in 
the Top 25 in earnings. 




Thomas W. Knight 



Serving The Real Estate Needs 
Of Chesapeake 

WAINWRIGHT REALTY 

Are you considering selling your home? If so, now is the ideal 
time. Call us for a free, no obligation market analysis. We wiU in- 
form you of the best methods of disposing of your property, 
various tvpes of financing available and other information per- 
tinent to the sale of your property. 

3237 Western Branch Blvd. 

In The Heart Of Churchland 




484-7777 



Monben of Portsmouth. Oietapcake Multiple Listim Service 
Metro Multiple Usting Service 
Prntsmouth, Chesapeake Board of Realtors 




January Salesman 
of the Month 




TOM SEDDON 
$21 5,000 in sales volume! ! 

Tcmi is starting the New Year off with a Iwikf 
He was (Mir lop \m Saks A^it, and is om Us 
way for 1983! 

Fot tc^notch, professional service, call Tom 
<tey ot night at 547-161« (home) or 547-^S5 (of- 
fice). 



WE ARC NO. I IN GREAT BRIDGE 

RICARDO, INC. 
REALTORS 



CHISAMARI, VA. 

S47-4SS5 

hi nM NMrt Of •»•« BrMf* 




€t 



We're working hard to make 
you at home in Chesapeake" 

Rhodes Realty, 
Ltd, 



220 BatUefield Blvd.. N. 
Ch^apeake, VA 23320 

CH)enSat.-Sun. 

482-4771 



mimm 



m^mmwmm^fi^^wmmKmi 



Virginia Beach Sun, February 9, 1983 1 1 



Vir3iiiia Beach Business & Real Estate Hews 




Realtors Provide Valuable 
Information For Relocation 



By Roger Pyle 



(L) Tom Sharpe (Far right) Jack Slawson, owners Polynesian Pools (center) 
Jim Noel, Mid Atlantic Regional Manager and Vice-President of the N.S.P.I. 

Polynesian Pools 
Wins National Awards 



Polynesian Pools, who 
has been gracing the 
Tidewater community 
yards with emerald gems 
of fun for over a decade, 
received two design awar- 
ds from the National Spa 
and Pool Institute for 
1983. 

More than SOO entries 
from all over the country 
were reviewed by a panel 
of nine judges consisting 
& N.S.P.I. builder mem- 
bers and experts from the 
fields of landscaping, 



design, and com- 
munications. Judging was 
based on design excellence 
and quality of construc- 
tion. 

For 1983, Polynesian 
Pools received a 2nd place 
Silver Medal Award in the 
800 square foot class for 
their installation of a pool 
built in the Little Neclt 
area of Virginia Beach, 
and a Merit Award in the 
600 square foot 

classification, for a pool 
built in the Kings Grant 



area, also in Virginia 
Beach. .„.___^. ^ 

Polynesian Pools has 
been the winner of top 
National Design Awards 
for the past two con- 
secutive years. 

"We are very pleased 
that these pools were 
selected for an award 
from a field that 
represents the best pools 
built by the industry this 
year," said Tom Sharpe, 
and Jack Slawson, owners 
of Polynesian Pools. 




21 X 40 Emerald shape pool winner of Silver Medal Award 



"Statistics indicate that 
one in five American fam- 
ilies move every five 
years," said June Wiltsie, 
Relocation Director at 
Goodman Segar Hogan. 
"And most out-of-town 
moves require a good deal 
more than the selling and 
buying of homes." 

Wiltsie noted that ex- 
pert help in finding a new 
hcxne in another com- 
munity is available from a 
Realt(»- or Realtor-Associ- 
ate in this community- 
and it can invdve every- 
thing from the commun- 
ity's "vital statistics" to 
employment opportuni- 
ties. 

The decision to pur- 
chase a new hone, under 
even the best of circum- 
stances, is difficult. But 
making the decision in an 
unfamiliar community, 
often within a short period 
of time, can be traumatic, 

Kyrus 
Announces 
1,700,000. 
Sale 

Kyrus and Associates 
Realty, Inc., a commercial 
real estate organization 
based in Virginia Beach, 
has announced the sale of 
The Arctic Motel at 311 
22nd Street, consisting of 
40 rooms, and The Arctic 
Apartments at 312 23rd 
Street, consisting of 24,, 
one-two bedroom apartr 
ments totaung 64 units for 
$1,700,000. 

Both buildings are 
owned by the Arctic 
Holding Corporation and 
James L. Midgett. The 
purchasers are Amy and 
Priti, Inc. originating out 
of Bombay, India. 

The motel facility is a 
two story brick building 
with swimming pool built 
in 1979, and the apar- 
tments are 15 years old. 
The apartments consist of 
one and two room units 
and are staying open year 
round. 

The transaction was 
handled by Ted Carr, 
Realtor with Thomas C. 
Kyrus and Associates 
Realty, Inc., who rqjre- 
sented both Buyer and 
Sellers. 



NOW AVAILABLE StaHon One 

24th & Ocean Front 
"V> Virginia Beach, Virginia 




im 2-Room Suites 



NEW CONSTRUCTION 



OCEANFRONT RESORT 
CONDOMINIUM 

24th&Atiantic 
Finest In Virginia Beach 
Own your own Oceanfront suite, not time 
sharing From »8 1,500. Exclusive sales 
by PYLE REALTY 460-1777. 

Sales Offi£e: 422-3185 ^Eves.) Roger Pyle 

340-6441 

BrAcn 
-.....^^Wefcoae. 

WE ARE GETTING GOOD RESULTS 
95 Sold, 9 Remain 





More 



Fra^ The Dollar, 
The More Vital 
The Home. 



Sometimes, wten you least expect it, you 
discover that special house. At Gifford, 
we've seen it happen for three decades. 
And that's why, especially today, our 
agents are so thoroughly trained to exper- 
tly guide you in creative financing that 
matches your budget. And help you turn 
that dream house into r«mty. 

Oiffdrd 



M REALTY, WC 



Key People in Tidewater Real Estate 
4303 Haygood Rd. 4««-2<24 
1S47 E. Little Creek Rd. St3-597i 



she said. "Thercfcwe most 
local Realtors are attuned 
to the transferee's feel- 
iqgs and can provide the 
time and support they 
need in fmding a home as 
wdl as selling their pre- 
sent home." 

In addition, the Realtw 
provides facts regarding 
the community, school 
systems, taxes, closing 
costs, transportation, cli- 
mate, area history and 
other pertinent informa- 
tion, she added. 



City-to-city relocation 
agencies provide direct 
information through the 
Realtor on hemes in target 
ckies, thus helping to 
reduce the transferees' 
feelings of anxiety. 

In addition, local Real- 
tors can contact those in 
the new community who 
will assist incoming trans- 



ferees by making hotel 
reservations, arranging 
appointments to view 
homes and other things 
designed to reduce 
anxiety over the prospect of 
wasted hours. 

Wiltsie said that most 
transferee buyers are 
highly motivated and de- 
cide on a house within 
three days, based upon 
their needs. 

"Salespeople need to 
be aware of what the 
buyer wants. If the buyer 
is not sure, or his 'dream 
house' is out of his finan- 
cial capabilities, it's up to 
the salesperson (to point 
that out to the buyer and 
put him on the right 
track." 

"So, if a transfer is 
contemplated, contMt a 
local Realto- for a variety 
of services, not just find- 
ing a home," Wiltsie con- 
cluded. 




The road to success starts when 
you are inspired to make the effort. 
We guarantee you will be 
motivated in just one hour with us. 
This success need not be 
specifically in sales. It can be yours 
from a working knowledge of the 
real estate market. 

So, why shouldn't you take that 
first step on the Road to Success! 

Call Us Today! 
5737 PrinccK Aine Road 

Virginia Beach, VA 23462 (W4) 499-2395 




Real Estate 
As An 
Investment 




BEVELYN B. FULK former manager of Smith- 
Dunfield Optical Co. Chesapeake office and E. Ray 
Howell in Norfolk has opened his own optical company 
trading as B.B. Fulk Optical Co. located next to 
Military Circle Mall opposite Leggett's at 5847 B, 
Poplar Hall Drive. 

Bev has been a resident of Tidewater for the past 23 
years. Before entering into the retail profession he was 
employed by Bausch and Lomb Inc. wholesale optical, 
in sales and management. 



Many people think of a 
Real Estate purchase only 
in terms of their own per- 
sonal residence. Actually 
the Real Estate investment 
is seldom outperformed as 
the best way to amass 
wealth while enjoying the 
best tax advantage. 

For example, the first 
time Real EsUte inv«tor 
may purchase a townhome 
now on the market in 
Virginia Beach for S8000 
down payment and 
assume the mortgage with 
payments of $577 ^ per 
month. The investor could 
lease the property for. 
realistically, $477 per 
month. It would cost the 
investor SlOO per month 
but he would gain: 
1) Approximately S3000 
or more per year 
f^eralincome tax deduc- 
tion for depreciation 
every year for 15 
years. 

$1200 deduction for 
cash flow of $100 per 
month. 
For a total yearly tax 
deduction of $4200. 

What that means to the 
person in the 40% income 
tax bracket is a $1€4K( ^ 



refund for a year. Those 
are green dollars in your 
pocket that all taxes have 
already been paid on~not 
like extra income. Mean- 
while your townhome is 
appreciating in value. In 5 
years you can probably 
sell it for a $15,000-20.000 
profit. 

This is just one oample 
of a conmion everyday 
Real Estate investment 
that you can make today. 
There are many othws. 
An apartment building 
with several partners also 
offers the same good tax. 
leverage and profit 
benefits. 

I attended a seminar at 
Tidewater Builders 
Association recently 
where a prominent ac- 
counting firm made a 
presentation on all the 
best iitvestments con- 
sidering tax benefits. It 
was interesting to note 
that vacation homes, such 
as the oceanfront resort 
condominiimu now being 
marketed in Virginia 
Beadi wtxt one of the best 
buys both from a tax 
benefit and profit stan- 



United Way 
Names Dan 
Advertising 



William F. Rountree, 
Jr., President of the Four 
aties United Way, an- 
nounced today that Dan 
Advertising and Public 
Relations has been named 
the ad agency to handle 
this year's United Way 
Campaign. 

Agency President 
Daniel Goldman will 
supervise the account and 



the firm's Broadcast 
Writer/Producer, Chris 
Calcagno, wHI handle the 
creative end. 

Dan Advertising and 
Public Relations is a 15- 
year-old Norfolk based 
company and a membo^ of 
the American Association 
of Advertising Agencies 
and the Public Relations 
Society of America. 







141 Virginia Beach Blvd. West 

Norfolk. Virghiia 23510 

Phone (804) 623-3831 

A DIVISiON KS COIjOMAL SEK VICE (X>tl>OIUTION 



OAtianlk IVfinaiieiit Mortgage Ckinipany 

A WhoUy Owned Subadinry of Atlantic Pennanent Fed^ 

Savinp k L<mui Association 

944 Independence Blvd. 

Virginia Be«:h. Virginia 23455 

(804)460-1376/2810 



^€oioma4 




^8(mifuMm 



A nVBION OF CXN.OMAL StVKC CORKMUTION 

Virginia Beach Bwlevard West 

Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

Phone (804) 623-3753 



Lyolonial oJitle 
Jxgency 

A nVNONOrOOUMMLKkVICSaMraKATION 

141 Virginia BckA Uvd. W^ 

NorfoU.Viiiinia 23510 

Telepliooe: (KM) 623-3831 



i 
I 



tmmmmimmmmmmm 



mmmi 



mm 



12 Virginia Beach Sun, February 9, 1983 




Th# Woman's View 




ANNOUNCEMENTS- 



The Chopp)n9 Block 

'Down Home' 
Goodness 



Faye Coard, with whom I wdrk, recently returned {from 
a visit home. 

Home is Jacksonville, Fla., and during her visit, she 
acquired two recipies which she says are "Dee-licious". 

The corn bread, although chilis are added, is not hot. 
;lt is wonderfully chewy and just plain 'Good'. 

The Peach Cobbler is quick, easy and 'Scrumptous*. 

Remember, if you don't have a 'yearning' for 
peaches, any type of fruit can be substituted.^ 

Hope you try these recipes, and Enjoy! 

Peach Cobbler 

1 Stick Margarine y4C sugar 
^4 0. Self Rising Flour* , ^4 Cup milk 

2 Cups peaches. 

* If plain flour is used, add Vi t. of baking powder and 
VzLsalt. 

Melt butter, put into baking dbh. In separate bowl, 
mix sugar, flour and milk. Pour in disk with butter and 
mix well. Drain peaches and put in with mixture. 

Bake at 350 for 45 minutes. 



Come On, Send 

Your Favorite Retipe 

To Me: 




Pat Beasley,W.V. Editor 

P.a Box 1327 
Chesapeake, Va., 23320 



Mexican Com Bread 
1 C. Yellow or white com meal Vi t. soda 

Vi t. salt " Vi t. Baking Powder 

2 beaten cgp 2 cups creamed corn 

Vi cup bacon drippinp ^4 cup butter milk 

4 ox. can green chili peppers (chop or liquify) 
1 cup grated cheddar cheese. 

Mix Ingredients • pour into well-greased cast iron 
skiUetdOlnch.) 

Bake at 400 for 30-40 minutes - or until crisp. Tum 
off heat and leave for a short time. 

Note: Although the bread appears undercooked, it is 
not - please do not overcook! 



Carraway House 

\ Unique Blend Of Eighteenth Century And Today 




Eighteenth 
Century 
Beauty 





1 . «^ 


I- 


The pianv^. lyakoi of hiM^taNiy. adonu the 











One can catch a glimpse 
of eighteenth century 
design on Witchduck 
Road in Virginia Beach by 
stopping by the Carraway 
House there. 

MemcH-ies of a simpler 
time will be rekindled 
with a visit to this early 
1700 home. There are 
beautiful period reproduc- 
tions throughout the inter- 
In- and the charm of the 
era captures the heart. 



Chris Swanner, who 
runs the shops carries a 
tremendous variety of 
reproductims and anti- 
ques, fdk art and stencil 
curtains. Country style 
furniture and furnishings 
and cdlectibles abound 
here. 

In the eight rooms yai 
will find antique beds of 
excellent quality, brass- 
ware, pewter craft items, 
uphdstered period furni- 




ture and even bathroon 
furnishings. 

I>r(H) by 317 South 
Witchduck Road in Vir- 
ginia Beach for a quick 
trip back in time and plan 
on spending some "brow- 



sing time" in this truly 
unique shq). 

They're open daily from 
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (except 
for Wednesday), and on 
Sunday the hours are 
limited to 1-5 p.m. 



Happy Valentine^s Day From The Woman's View 



Zela Upsilon Chapter of Beta Sigma PM 

The Zeta Upsilon Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi held its 
Pledge Ritual on Jan. 24 at the home of Marie Judah. 

The pledges who were oficially inducted into the 
chapter are as follow: Donna Bonclli, Debby Greer, 
Loirise TenEyck and Sherry Pilkuigton. 

After the traditional candlelight ctttmony, everyone 
enjoyed various homemade delicacies brought by eadi 
member. 

Congratulations and best of hick are in order for each 
member, a welcome addition to Our chapter - from Jo 
Williams. 

The Polly Miller Chapter Of The American Busineai 
Women's Association 

The Polly Miller Chapter of The American Business 
Women's Association will hold its monthly meeting on 
Monday, Feb. 14-, 6:30 p.m. at Jerry's Restaurant on 
Military Highway. 

The guest speaker will be Ms. Nonie Milligan, who 
will speak on the topic: "How To Get Ahead In A 
Man's World." 

G. A. TreaUe Elementary School 

The monthly P.T.A. meeting for G.A. Treakle 
Elementary School will be held Feb. 14 (Monday) at 
7:30 p.m. in the cafeterioum. 

The school is located at 2500 Gilmerton Road, 
Chesapeajce. 

The program is entitled 'Runaways/Teenage Suicide'. 

New Toastmistress Club Meets 

The first meeting of a new Toastmistress Club, 
organized by employees of Naval Sea Support Center, 
Atlantic Detachment, was held Friday, Jan. 28 in Por- 
tsmouth. 

Guest speaker for the initial meeting was Gwendolyn 
Pharr, Extension Chairman of Council Three, Inter- 
national Toastmistress Clubs. Ms. Pharr explained the 
objectives, policies and benefits of Toastmistress mem- 
bership. The agenda for the meeting also included elec- 
tion of temporary officers. Elected were: President, 
Shirley Ross; Vice President, Deanna Freeman; 
Secretary, Sandra Petty; and Treasurer, Pat Margeson. 
Kim Bernier was chosen as the club's temporary 
delegate to council. 

Membership in the new club is hot limited to NAV- 
SEACENLANT DET employees, but is open to anyone 
interested in improving their communication and 
leadership skills. The club will meet at 11:30 on the 2nd 
and 4th Wednesdays of each month in Building 217, St. 
Juliens Creek Annex, with the next meeting scheduled 
for February 9. 

Inquiries regarding membership should be directed to 
Sandra Pettyat 485-61 10. ^ ; ^ 

Miss Oiesapeake Pageant - 1983 

The Greater Chesapeake Jaycees have ccmducted the 
Miss Oiesapeake Pageant for over 17 years and have 
made available many thousands of dollars in scholar- 
ships and prizes. 

This year's pageant will be held mi May 7 at Deep 
Creek High School Auditorium. It is anticipated that 
over $2,000 will be awarded in scholarships and prizes. 
The successful contestant will represent Chesapeake at 
the Miss Virginia Pageant in July. 

Applications are now being accepted fcM- this year's 
pageant, entrants must be a high school graduate by 
Sept. 1983 and their ages shall not be less than 
seventeen or more than twenty-six years by Sept. 1, 
1983. Applications should be received no later than 
March 5, 1983. Applications may be obtained at 
Chesapeake area high schools or by writing: Miss 
Chesapeake Pageant, Suite 325, 6330 Newtown Road. 
Norfolk, Virginia, 23502. For further information, call: 
David Mason, Chairman, office, 461-7100, heme, 
545-6643, or Lynn Evans, Sr. Co-Chairman, home. 
487-0402. 



Edic AiUuns 

OuttiVjirl* BEAUTY £ 



BEAUTY SALONS 



We have styling choices 

for everyone and for 

all ages! 

Professional 
Perms 

*12.95i;p 



Midcity Shopping Center 
399-8881 




Open 9-6 Daily 
9-9 Thursday 

Precision 
Haircuts 

*5.45 



873 S. Lynnhaven Pkwy. 
468-6366 

5118 V. Beach Blvd. 539-Hilltop Plaza 
497-9769 428-9897 

6507 Aobum Drive 4801-E Shore Drive 
420-6069 460-3233 

1734 E. Uttle Creek Road 
588-9093 

No Appointments - Come In At Your 

Convenience 

Also 3 salons in Newport News and 

Hampton 



.OUNCE O' GOLD 

ANNOUNCES 

JUST IN TIME 

FOR THAT 

SPECIAL VALENTINE 

14 Karat Gold 

Salesman's Sample 

^ Thru Feb. 14 

Serpentine Bracelets & Chains 
^ Only .90 Inch 

Herringbone Bracelets & Chains 
A| Only '2.53 Inch 

Gold Hearts Only *24.95 

Qosi-Add A Beads (10,12,14 mm) 
m^ Only '2.50 Each. 



Greenbrier Mall 

Chcaapcake 

420-3932 
Virginia Beach 

filtHHItopWcsl 

425-0440 




^i 



A*. 



rihur^KyHurrajf 

Franchisee! >- Dan(^ Studio 



Dancing. 

Get the spirit Lau^ and have 
some smiles again Loosen 
up and dance the night away 
Slop being a watcher and step out 
into the fun 

ItWiilCheer 

You Up, Lift You Up, And 

Put Smiles Of Fun m\bur 



Life. 




Ydu can do it at Arttiur Murray s 
The leading dance instruclor^an 
make you a superb dancer, with 
poise and new confidence 

8 Sessions For 
»20.»» 



Learning to dance is easy and lun 
with the proven Arthur Mirray's 
method Meeting new people tmi 
going out is a part o< the benefits a 
good dancing partner gets Taka 
the first step, call for lessons today. 



Hustle ■ Swing ■ SiOiM Oanca ■ 
Cha-Cha ■ Fox Trot ■ Rumba 
• Country ■ Others 



1P.M. to 10 P.M. 



467-4747 



740 Timberlake Shopping Ctr. 
Holland Road & S. Plaza Trail 

Virginia ^ach 



The 

Hint 
Man 

By ChMk fwOtmut 

Carpel Sweeper, !■• 
pcerii^ 111 E tWi lii y ■ To 

improve your carpet 
sweeper's effectiveacu. 
fir^ cmnb the brashes 
while the sweeper is upside 
down and remove « much 
lint, hair, and dirt as 
possible. Now, with the 
fingertips, moisten the 
brushes. You'll find it im- 
proves the piclc-up 
tremendiously. 
Caaliflower, Boiilag • 
Adding two uri)iespoons 
of pure lonon juice or 
vinegar to die water will 
improve the taM and keep 
|itmowy-wUte, 

Or, aidd mie>half cup of 
fresh milk to the water. 
This method also works 
wonders. 

Celery, K sspl H H Crisp • 
Lay it in a dish of cold 
water, then slice a raw 
potato into the water. Let 
it stand for three hours, 
then remove the oekry 
from the water. It'll be as 
good as new. 

Cheese • Any cheese 
retains its flavor, even 



'l^M|^^ 



when hard as a rock. Save 

it and grate for spaghetti 

and soups. 

Or grate it and grind it, 

then mix with grated, raw 

onion for a spread. 

Cheese will grate much 

easier if chilled first. 

To prevent cheese from 

hardening, wrap it in it 

soft cloth soaked in white 

vinegar. Wrap it com- 

pl^y, then put in a cool, 

drypUce. 

Note: Only use the 

refrigerator as a last 

resort. 

Chewing Gom, Removing 

- Put two or three ice 

cubes in a soft cloth, then 

phice directly onto the 

material. Wait ten 

mhiutes, then break off 

die frozen gum. 

Note: If the gum is stuck 

on a thick carpet, use an 

kM comb to clean the 

area. 

Chudc Faulkner is brought to 
you through the courtesy of The 
Daaalai Compaay, a local 
publiihing firm, and Chuck 
Faulkner. The book is available 
in moat book stores. 



-;1 



Th§ Uprooted Gourmet 
WiURctWB Next Week 
To 7%# Woman*5 View 



CiMrance Sale 




WINTER COATS 



Niw Spring Arrivals DaOyH! 



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WindmUlPoint. VA 22578 



Plan Ahead 

For The 

1983 

Boating Season 

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Contact hfike MecOey at 



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or,ToirracIaVir^iU8 

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MARINE RESORT 



_ J 



Virginia Beach Sun, February 9, 1 983 13 



iir.*i-^r*« *-'^^ 




e Woman's View 



Notes To My Friends.. 




sing to us in the^ties,. . . 

November 29, 1979. 

It'i «K of tholr 
that happoM a kM. 
rMwfyiwariUxnttit 

A man I know ia ^ 
Coast Guard called MAir 
and t(dd me M>m ke^ j|p^ 
his wife woe stoKMirtttif^l 
night, and in the ixuo^ 
fusion of loading their 
purchases in the car^ the 
wife's purse was teft on 
the ground in the parUi^ 
lot, its absence unnoticed 
until they got home. 

In the purse, the 
family's credit citds, 
cash, identification, all" 
those things wives carry 
and husbands give wives 
tocarry. 

In short... a calamity. 

But, an honest man 
found that purse, tooirit 
to a nearby store. The 
store caned my fridid, and 
everything got back like it 
was supposed to be. 

My friend wanted to 
thank the honest man in-^ 
volved, but he didn't leave 
his name. 



I suspect that tt^ 
things lappak ^Kl|e^tin|e, 
but hardly anybo^ ever 
calls the police to te^osi a 
oueofhon^^ /^ 4 

It pleases &§lcr1)la6le 
to report tUs one. u g 
December milpp^^f 

Andbeffttfrf Is. just 
an item or so that m^t 
otherwise bejniued in the 
welter of ai^ts. 

RCA, the com- 
munficatiottii company, 
launced m ' new '<iom* 
munfiaitioiB satelHte last 
Thufkday, aM they've 
been trying to fiiKi it evCTy 
siffiMi. 

^ Phoenix; Arizona, the 
clan afr e^, is under 
sbog alert. 

ttAtlknta, J. K. Ramey 
has a sign tb Warn visitors 
about Atlanta's oindnat 
elonent — a biO board, 
righr te' t6p of Us tire 
store. It's fH'oclaimed Oie 
messs^ for days noir that 
you have to Atremely 
captions in Atlanta. 

Ramey knows whereof 
he S|ieak^ his store was 
robbed again last Satur- 
day. 




And, the Reverend Joe 
McAfee, a former 
burglar, recently had this 
tip for those who wish to 
av(Md being victimized by 
those who still work his 
former trade. 

Don't hide your jewels 
in the freezer. 

With the price of meat 
nowadays, that's the first 
place a good burglar 
loolu. 

This series of excerpts from 
"Notes To My Friends" is 
Iff ought to you through the cour- 
tesy of Tkc Doailag Coapuy, a 
local publishing firm, and Jim 
Kincaid. The boolc is a vailable in 
most book stores. 




Old-Ivory Color Scheme Lends 

Tranquil Feeling To Kitchen-Family Room 



'i-^*^ .1 



Did You Know? 

An all new G. E. Kitchen plus 'lOiOOO is grand prize 
in the Hellmann's or Best Foods '100,000 Baking Con- 
test. In addition, there are 663 other pi^ for the best 
original cake, pie, cookie <» brrad recipes using at least 
yk cup real mayonnaise. Clearly print recipe, name and 
address on pliun p^)er, no larger than 8Vi" by 11", and 
include 1 proof-or-pUTehase from a 32 oz. jar of 
Helhnann's or Best Foods real mayonnuse and inail to: 
Hellmann's or Best Foods '100,000 Baking Contat, P. 
O. Box 2335, Westbury, NIV, 11991, btfbrc April 30, 
1983. ^„.. .^..,. ' 

If you do have a good'mayomdSfe recipe - why not 
send it m? ' in > V ( 



Jet'aimeplia 

qu'hler mains 

.quedematn 




One of the most 
poptilar new colors to hit 
the decorating scene 
recently is old ivory, a 
creamy off-white hue that 
iminrts an atmosphere of 
serenity to any room it 
graces. 

Witness the com- 
bination kitchen and 
family room (together 
called a "great room") 
created by the interior 
designers at Armstrong 
and done floor to ceiling in 
old ivory. The room 
otudes tranquility, and the 
color has the further effect 
of making the space seem 
larger than it is. 

All the materials in the 
room are either taken 
from nature or manmade 
look-alikes of natural 
materials, with a heavy 
accent on cane, rattan, 
and other fibers. All of the 
walls, for instance, are 
cover«l with natural-grass 
wallpaper ~ the shade of 
old ivory, of course. 

The caning is just as 
ubiquitous. It's used on 
the front of the kitchen 
cabinets, framed by strips 
of half-round molding. 
It's the backing of the 
comfortable club chairs 
inthe kitchen, from 
Thomasville's award- 
winning Country 
Collection. 

The cane appears again 
in the sliding screen doors 
which separate the kitchen 
from the family room. 
Even with the doors 
closed, the family room 



still receives sunlight 
from the kitchen through 
the screens. When not in 
use, the doors slide back 
into recesses ("pockets") 
in the walls dividing the 
two rooms. 

The daybed cushioning 
is covered with quilted 
natural linen, with parallel 



ribs every six inches. 

The only contrast to the 
old-ivory color scheme is 
the accent wlor - a bright 
kumquat - which shows 
up in the floor pillows, 
kitchenware, and .flowers 
(tiger lillies, whose vase is 
an ordinary fishbowl of 
the sort found in any five- 
and-ten-cent store). 

Accessories include: a 



square-columned, burled 
olive wood floor lamp; a 
corn plant (which thrives 
in dark corners and needs 
little care) in an oversized 
woven reed basket; a 
Grecian wooden pedestal 
painted old ivory; a luci(e 
pedestal table for holding 
drinks and such; and a 
variety of seashells^ 
It's a Stfene environ- 



ment. And since it is 
monochromatic, the at- 
mosphere can easily be 
changed from winter to 
summer by changing the 
colors of the few ac- 
cessories. Furthermore, 
old ivory is a color that's 
easy to live with and that 
you won't grow tired of in 
a year or two. 




Ii:.t #i 




OR 





Porc«fWf 

.•'■ft.' 
Acfyltes 

THE LATEST IN APPLIED NAILS 




Barbara Niks ^^t^S/m 

TekphoMf ^7-4799 49ih9287 



From FDA Consumer 

Cellulite: Hard To Budge Pudge 



"You don't have to be 
overweight to have 
cdlulite," warns the ad- 
vertisement. "Try the 
cellulite pinch test. No 
matter how thin you are, 
those ugly bumps just 
won't go away." 

So, thousands of 
women pinch the backs of 
their ^, watch the skin 
dimple and pucker until it 
resembles orange peel, 
and send away for the 



cream or pill or sponge 
that works like magic to 
take the "cellulite" away. 
"Cellulite" (pronoun- 
ced cell-u-leet) is a term 
coined in European salons 
and spas to describe those 
deposits of fat on 
women's thighs and but- 
tocks that seem to stub- 
bornly resist diet and exer- 
dx. It is alleged to be a 
special type of "fat-gone- 
wrong." a combination of 



fat, water, and toxic 
wastes that should have 
been eliminated from the 
body but wasn't. Celluhte 
thoerists claim that 
cellulite afflicts nearly 
eight out of ten women, 
while most men aren't af- 
fected because of their dif- 
ferent hormones and 
physical makeup. Because 
cellulite isn't "ordinary" 
fat, these self-styled exper- 
ts claim, only extraor- 



dinary treatments will be 
effective. 

Advertisements for 
mail-order products to 
banish cellulite still appear 
in such publications as 
Cosmopolitan. Among 
products promoted as 
sure-fire cellulite remedies 
are "loofah" sponges, 
cactus fiber washcloths, 
horsehair mitts, creams 
that "dissolve" cellulite, 
vitamin-mineral sup- 
plements with herbs, exer- 
cise books, liquids to be 
used in the bath, 
massagers, rubberized 



pants, brushes, rollers, 
and toning lotions. The 
coiyts can mouiu. ^ickly, 

cellulite "program," such 
as a MO bottom of 
vitamin-mineral tablets 
and a '15 jar of cream. 

Before sending money for 
a mail-order cellulite 
remedy, consumers should 
consider this: There is no 
medical evidence that 
these remedies work. In 
fact, it is difficult to find 
scientific evidence that 
cellulite even exists. None 
of thess medical dic- 



tionaries published since 
1974 lists cellulite. A brief 
statement was issued by 
■ tC AMA on June 21, 
1976, "There is no 
medical condition known 
or described as cellulite in 
this country." 

Fat seems to land where 
it wants to, and on some 
people it ends up on hips ' 
and thighs. Call it cellulite 
or anything else, but it's- 
still just plain FAT. 
Obesity experts say there's '• 
only one way to get rid of 
cellulite — diet and exer- 
cise. 



BevFulk 

Announces The Opening Of 

B.B.Fulk 

Optical Company 

5847-B Poplar Hall Drive ^ 

Norfolk, Virginia, 23502 
(Beside Military Circle - Across From Leggctts) 

Phone 461-3515 



1^ Optician Ray-Ban Magnifiers 
Sunglass^ 



EIFTS 




Brenda Smith 
Michaei Smith 

Country Accessories Country Curtains 

Handmade Items Hand Crafted Furniture 

Candles and Oil Lamps 

Hows: 

MoMay - Stivniay 10-S:M 

Siiii«lay 1-5 p.m. 



Country Touch 

COUNTRY ACCESSORIES" 

482-5311 

120 S. Bat tiefleid Blvd. 



-mXT TO THE CREA T BRIDGE LOCKS" 





R**' ^ 



Special 
Discount 



Ciiesapealce Ctiimney 
SweeiM And General Repair 

482^1179 



p«itfa| off bavii^ 
hCCHM <rf ihc c<wi 
|ra« tfoa'l have to wirfl 
1 kaow Itat ihMt arc bard 
aai wt iHi 4a what «c caa to hdp yoa 
CfeiaMwy FIret c» be 
le jrow boMc aad hnily. 
Wc irti dcaa ny oac or h»o iiory cMm- 
wy for ttc tow cart ^ 'IS. ThcR Mill be ■ 
■S Service Cbai|t to pril obI yoar wood 
mmn aad replace il. Tbb b ■ 
offw. So Deo'l Delay! If yoa have 
wmj ipita^ paiatiag or carpcolry work 
AM wH seed doiii«, we caa ^e yoa a 
frwul lMle . 

■a> imrart Stele Reg. fOlSOM 

Jeff Stewart 





^^^Mtyles 



955 5. Lynnluveii Road 
NottoMcbcOe'i 



INTRODUCTORY 
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Virginia Beacli, Va., 23464 

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14 Virginia Beach Sun, February 9, 1983 



Yirsinia Beach City Council Byu. 



Cahill 



Woodstock Park Receives Resolutions 



Two resolutions adopted by Virginia Beach City 
Council Monday will help get the development of 
Woodstock Park started. 

The park will be located on 30 acres of land owned by 
the city at the intersection of 1-64 and Providence Road. 

One resolution authorizes City Manager Thomas H. 
Muehlenbeck to submit a request for $185,180 from the 
Virginia Commission of Outdoor Recreation and the 
National Park Service of the U.S. Department of the In- 
terior. The remaining major cost would be furnished by 



Revenue Sharing funds. The total development cost is 
estimated at $849,180. The Capital Improvement 
Project budget provides for $664,000 in city funds. 

The second resolution asked the Virginia Commission 
for $24,000 in recreation access road funds to construct 
a 20- foot section of a 1,400-foot road on public land. 
The remainder of the road, across a Vepco right of way 
that crosses the park site, will be paid for with a $20,000 
allocation in the CIP budget . 



Will McDonald's Need A Roof? 



When Virginia Beach Qty Council decides next week 
whether to permit McIXmald's to put a roof on its 
oceanfront restaurant, it will have as a guide only 
a policy of long standing. 

Recent attempts to change the city's (H'dinances to 
permit patio restaurants on the oceanfrrait have failed. 
As a result the McDonald's operation remains a 
n(Mi-conforming use, an open air restaurant facing the 
ocean, in an area zoned for hotels. Commercial 
activities have been divided from hotels on the 
beachfront since 19S7 with Atlantic Avenue as a 
dividing line. A Virginia Beach Ordinance separating 
the uses was in effect before the merger of the city with 
Princess Anne County in 1963 when the division was 
reestablished. 

Oty Manager Thcmias H. Muehlenbeck said that the 
staff recommended against the McDonald's application 
for a permit because the request, an expansion of the 
present building, would be contradictory to Council 
pdicy. 

The application was deferred at a previous Oxindl 
sessicm until next Monday to give staff time to prepare 
a report. 

The city's policy was supported by the Circuit Court 
recently. The Court first ruled against the city because 
a requirement that the restaurant not be visible from 
outside the zoning lot was vague. Gven 90 days to 
amend the ordinance, the dty adopted an amendment 
that requires full enclosure of all restaurants and 
uphdding the principle of separaticm. Tliis has met 
with the approval of the Court. 

The more recent problems began when six specific 
hotels were discovered in 1980 to be operating so-called 
"patio restaurants" on the Boardwalk side of their 
projpenies. They were visible fran outside the zoning 
lot. Qie of the restaurant operators sued the city for 




Bmce 

IflWasMayor ... 

Watch Foreigners 

Virginia Beach resident Donald Bruce is in the 
analysis business. Since moving to the resort city 
nine months ago, one thing that has concerned 
him has been what he has viewed as a great influx 
of foreign investors. 

"If I was mayw, I'd keep a real close eye on the 
Arabs," said Bruce. "They are moving in and 
taking over the area. Hiere are just four or five of 
them taking over the whde country." 

Bruce said he was disturbed by the $20,000 
donation made to Virginia Beach last summer by 
Saudi Arabian Sheik Mohammad S. A. al-Fassi. 
"That was an insult to the American intellect," 
said Bruce. "You've got to remember there is 
always a motive behind money. I think it was 
envious that al-Fassi was just trying to gain 
pditical .influence in this area. 

"If I had been mayor at the time, 1 would have 
spent that $20,000 on exactly the opposite of what 
the sheik wanted it spent on," Bruce added. 

"I guess you might think I've got a bigotted 
attitu(te, Init really, I don't," Bruce explained. 
"I'm an analyst, and I'm concerned with the 
commercial credibility of our city. People don't 
want all erf their land bought out frwn under them. 
If they perceive that that is what is happening, 
they get scared, and our marketability is in 

trouble. 

"Yup," Bruce reiteraUd, "If I was mayor, I'd 
sure keep an eye on those guys." 



ten years, is a monbo- of the American Society of 
Assosors, the American Association of Appraisers and 
presi<tent of the Hampton Roads Chapter. 
CouiuHlwoman Meyera Obondorf was absent. 

Correction 

Virginia Beach Police Chief Charles R. Wall was 
hired in 1981 by former Virginia Beach City Manager 
George Hanbury, not by Virginia Beach's current Cii> 
Manager, Thomas Muehlenb^k, as stated in last week's 
issue. 



enforcing the ordinance because the ordinance was 
outdated. 

aty Planning Director Rdjert Scott said that some of 
the restaurants were well-kept and well mannered 
while others were boisterous. 

Councilman Jdm A. Baum said that the public on the 
boardwalk has some rights. 

Scott said that unfortunately some of the establish- 
ments were boisterous. 

Councilman Jack Jennings said that while the 
question appeared to be difficult on the surface it could 
be resolved. A^ 

However, on a tour of the restaurants, he said that 
the patio restaurants were of poor construction quality, 
the units were unsightly and ill kept and did not reflect 
the quality the "World's Largest Resort Qty" wanted 
to expose to visitors. He said the restaurants are in 
direct conflict with the beautification planned for 
Atlantic Avenue. 

He said that some establishments were "cleverly 
dis|uised as patio restauranu," while others were not 
restaurants at all. 

He suggested Virginia Beach look at the way Norfolk 
handles the problem, in exjunction with the ABC 
Board. 

He added that while the pec^le who walk on the 
boardwalk have rights some of their conduct is less than 
desirable. 

Councilman W.H. Kitchin ffl said the city has 
sufficient adinances to regulate the establishments, 
bult that "everbody can break the law; then the honest 
citizens have to go to court to prove it." He said that 
most of the patio restaurants were built without a 
pcmit, but that "we can't go down and bulldoze them; 
we've got to prove he's wrong." He said it took the city 
three years to close the establishments but two still are 
operating. 

Exception To Primaries 

Virginia Beach wants to be listed as an exception to 
legislation which requires localities to have primary 
elections to determine Council candidates at the 
request of political parties. 

By a vote of 8-2, City Council Monday afternoon 
adopted a resolution asking to be included with the 
cities of Hampton, Norfolk and Richmcmd as exceptions 
to the bill. Senate Bill No. 273. i^proval of the request 
would allow Virgiinia Beach to continue to have 
non-partisan electitms.- 

Councilman Jack Jennings voted against the resdu- 
tion because he said the law gives the city more 
options. "I dm't think we should be giving away 
rights." He said that without the legislation, "we 
would be giving away an opticm of having partisan 
elections. 

Councilman Robert G. Jones also voted against the 
resdution. Councilwonan Meyera OberndcH-f was 
absent. 

Councilman Hardd Heischd>er said that it was in the 
best interest of the citizens that the elections be 
non-partisan and moved for adoptirai of the resolution. 

Jennings said it would be in the best interest for the 
local populace to have opticms. 

Heisdiober panted out that the local populace would 
not have the option, but the oditical party. 

Jennings said that it was all in the perspective. 

With the legislatian which was passed last year, ttit 
dty is required to have a primary election to choose 
Council candidates if a pditical party requests one. 
Candidates still can run independently. 

Councilman John A. Baum objected that the 
Legislature passe^ legislation which affect the cities 
without the cities' approval. "We find out about these 
things and are forced to react," he said. He said that 
Chesapeake has primaries and whoever wins the 
Democratic primary is on Council. He said he'd rather 
be an exception. 

Mayor Lewis R. Joies said that the party has an 
option, the City Coundl does not have under the 
legislation. 



Banagan Succeeds Menitt 

Jerald Douglas Banagan, the assistant real estate 
assessor, will become real estate assessor after the retire- 
ment of Clyde Menitt on March 1 . 

Virginia Beach City Council Monday afternoon by a 
10-0 vote approved his appointment to the post on the 
recommendation of a Coundl committee consisting of 
Vice Mayor Barbara Henley (chairman), and Coun- 
cilmen Jack Jennings, John A. Baum and Harold 
Hdschobo'. 

Henley said that Banagan has been with the city for 



Beach Council Actions 




John A. Baum 
Mackwalcr 



Nancy A. Creech 
Ai-L«rtc 



Barbara M. Henley 
Pnnto 



Harold H^chobcr 
f'Al-LarKc 



H.JackJenning!) 
Lynnbavcn 



LobIs R. Jones 
Baysidc 






Robert G. Jones 
Al-Iarge 



W. H. Kilchin, IH 
Virginia Beach 



RebaS.McChinan 
PrinccH Anne 



J. Henry McCoy, Jr. 
Kemfpsvillc 



Meyera Oberndurf 



Meeting Date, Monday, February 7, 1983; Absent: M. Oberndorf 



* Informal Session 

A>»ofAM «HM 

Mayor Jones wished happy birthday to Council merabers 
celebrating birthdays in February including M. Oberndorf, H. 
McCoy, J. Baum and himself. Jones presented an Aquarius 
calie to them. Also, Jones thanlied those council members who 
have attended city functions and represented the city. 



Mayor Jones announced that a legislative dinner for council 
members and for Virginia Beach legislators will take place Feb. 
10 in Richmond. 

if Administrative Items 

Patio ■Mtavraals 

Director of Planning Robert J. Scott made a presentation of 
patio restaurants and non-conforming uses at the oceanfront. 



Director of Planning Robert J. Scott discussed with Council 
an amendment to a resolution regarding conditions and restric- 
tions attached to rezonings. 



W. B. Shafer, Jr. 88, presented copies of his book, "Three 
Books That Made The South, One Thousand Millionaires, Ten 
Billionaires" To Mayor Jones and to City Manager Muehlen- 
beck. 

* Formal Session 

Presentations 



Will Forbes, a senior at First Colonial High School and a 
football star, was recognized for his championship and his 
designation in local, regional and state compction and was ap- 
plauded as The Virginian-Pilot and The Ledger-Star Player of 
the Year for 1982. He was presented a resolution of 
recognition. 

Resolutions 

••Mit* Bill 273 

Resolution requesting that Subsection B of Senate Bill No. 
273 presented for consideration of the 1983 General Assembly 
be amended by adding thereto Virginia Beach to the cities 
exempt from the provisions of Subsection A Section 24. 1 -90. 1 , 
Code of Virignia. Adopted 8-2 with one addition to read: "and 
all members of the House Privileges and Elections Coinmil- 
lec." Jennings, R. Jones dissenting. 



an additional week as additional information has not been 
received by Council. Adopted, 9-0. MCCoy absent. 

•Low bid of Dominion Ecological Services, Inc., in the 
amount of $59,321 for the Animal Control Crematory; and, 
authorize the City Manager to enter into necessary agreements 
for the implementation of this project. Adopted, 9-0. McCoy 
absent. 

•Bingo and Bingo/Raffle permits were granted as follows: 
Lynnhaven Junior High Band Parents' Association; St. 
Nicholas/Greek Orthadox Church; Vii^nia Beach Astros; 
Virginia Beach Education Association; Virginia Beach Sun 
Wheelers, Inc.; raffle permits only. Veterans of Foreign Wars 
Post 392 and St. Matthews Catholic Church; Bingo/Raffle 
permits. Adopted, 9-0. McCoy absent. 

•Request of City Treasurer for tax refunds in the amount of 
$437.74. Adopted, 9-0. McCoy absent. 

if Planning Items 

ClMHfpo of Zoning 

Applications of R. G. Moore for change of zoning on two 
sites located along the east side of First Colonial Road, south of 
Wildwood Drive (Lynnhaven Borough). First parcel: From R-4 
Residential District to O-l Ofrice District on a 1 1 .2-acre parcel. 
Approved 9-0. McCoy absent. Second parcel: From R-4 
Residential District to A-2 Apartment District on a 23.8 acre 
parcel. Adopted 10-0 with amendments offered by Council in 
re-stating condition number four and adding condition number 
seven for construction of cul-de-sac. Councilwoman Creech 
later abstained from voting on the second parcel due to 
possible conflict of interest. 

BapttetCborcli 

Request of Rev. Dale Burden in the matter of the application 
of Gateway Freewill Baptist Church to delete condition 
requiring dedication of property along Virginia Beach 
Boulevard. By 10-0 vote, matter deferred one week until Feb. 
14 meeting. 

* Unfinished Business 

CaMoMMtlof Cooodl 

Council directed City Manager to draft an ordinance for the 
Feb. 14 formal session. Adopted, 7-3. Baum, Creech, L. Jones 
dissenting. 



if New Business 



Resolution authorizing certain sand grading activities at 
Sand Bridge Beach due to emergency situation caused by a 
storm on Jan. 28, 1983. Adopted, 10-0. 



Council appointed Jerald Douglas Banagan new City 
Assessor effective Mar. I, replacing retiring Clyde Merritt. 
Adopted, 1(M). 

Briofflofi 

VEPCO offlcial Harold Adam briefed Council on proposed 
230 KW transmission line between Green Run and Greenwich 
Substation. 



Resolution to express opposition to House Bill 8S7 reference 
appointment of school t>oard members by local governing 
bodies. Adopted, 9-1 . McClanan dissenting, 



* Consent Agenda 



• Resolution of Recognition to Will Forbes. Adopted 9-0. 
McCoy absent. 

•Resolutions regarding Woodstock Park, 30 acres of proper- 
ty located at the intersection of 1-64 and Providence Road. 
Adopted 9-0. McCoy absent. 

•Resolution amending a resolution adopted on Nov. 8. 1982 
pertaining to conditions and restrictions attached to rezonings. 
Adopted, 8-2, with City Manager's r«»mnmidation and ad- 
ditional paragraph submitted by Councilman Jennings which 
gives the landowner one week's advance notice of comments of 
Planning Department. McClanan, R. Jones dissenting. 

•Ordinance to amend and reordain Section 18-76.1 of the 
Code of the City of Virginia Beach pertaining to Dealers to 
Precious Metab and Gems. Adopted, W). McCoy absent. 

•Ordinance declaring certain property Excess and 
auihorizmg the City Manager to execute an option granting the 
same to the Commonwealth of Virginia, Department of High- 
ways and Transporution. Adopted, 9-0. McCoy absent. 

•RKommendation of City Manage that Ordimwx closing, 
vacating and discontinuing a poMon of an unimprovMl alley 
totalling l,84S.8-square feet located between Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and 18Ui Street in the petititw of PeiN J. Giiaieni 
and Joseph J. Guakni (Lyiuihaven Borough) be deferred foi 



Request to Gateway Office Center in the matter of the ap- 
plication of Virginia Beach Holding Corporation for a change 
of zoning approved Jan. 23, 1978 to relieve resUlction of con- 
dition 6. (There is no parking in rear). Council voted to remove 
condition for there to be no parking in the rear subject to the 
construction of a seven foot fence across the rear of the proper- 
ty. Building will be based on site plan presented to Council 
Monday. Approved, 9-0. McCoy absent. 



Request of Mr. Wayne Skinner, president of Outreach for 
Christ, Inc., a tax-exempt organization. Recommendation by 
the City Mana^r that Council take no action on Mr. Skinner's 
request as it will not preclude consideration by the General 
Assembly. Mayor Jones is going to respond to request on 
behalf of Council due to insufficient time for the staff to make 
proper investigation of legislation being offered by Sen. A. 
Joseph Canada. Adopted, 9-0. McCoy absent. 



Rev. Tommy Taylor of London Bridge Baptist Church 
requested direction on the removal of the Playboy Channel 
from Cox Cable Television. The City Attorney is going to 
review the franchise agreement to det«-mine Council's legal 
position. 



if Adjournment 



Recessed to executive session at 6:12 p.m. and adjourned at 7 
p.m. 



Beach Minister Questions Playboy Channel 



A Virginia Beach minister wants to know how he 
could have the Playboy channel removed from Cox 
Cable TV programming. 

The Rev. Tommy Taylor, pastor of the London 
Bridge Baptist Church, told City Council Monday af- 
ternoon that the city has a responsibility and obligation 
for the morals of the community. He said that TV has a 
tremendous influence on people's lives and noted that it 
costs S3S0,000 for a minute commercial on the Playboy 
channel. 

He said that the dty is allowing pornography over 
television that it would not allow in book stores or in 



magazines. He said that in case of sexual crimes, por- 
nc^aphy is always involved. 

He askKi how he could have the channel removed 
from the air. 

Mayor Louis R. Jones said he was not sure what the 
legal position would be, and neither was City Attorney 
Dale Bimson. 

Mayor Jones instructed Bimson to review the 
l^alitia and send a letter to Taylor . 

He said that franchises differ. Taylor had pointed out 
that other cities do not have the channel . 



Virginia Beach Sun, February 9, 1983 15 




With Jones from left is Mariel Blanco, Anne Doherty and Captain John A. Carbone, CO of Amphib Base. 

Mayor Salutes "Up With People" 



Virginia Beach Mayor 
Louis R. Jones recently 
proclaimed Wednesday, 
Feb. 9 as "Up With 
People Day" in the city. 



"Up With People," a 
live musical show which 
features 120 young men 
and women from 16 dif- 
ferent countries, is coming 



to the Amphibious Base, 
Little Creek Theater Feb. 
9, and is scheduled 40^last 
two hours. Tickets are $4 
general admission. 



The internationally-ac- 
claimed Up With People 
Show was performed at 
Super Bowl XVI in Pon- 
tiac, Mich. 



I — Student Creative Corner 



The following works were submitted by Princess An- 
ne Elementary School. The principal is Pearl N. 
Moyers. 



Life Expressions 

Life in America 
Is falling apart. 
When is it going to end, 
When did it start? 
America look what we 
Are going through! 
But otherwise, America 
We love you! 

IBy Janell Lyon, 11, amt Andrea Ontlcy, 11. Jaaell is the 
(daughter of Ternmce and Ethel Lyon. Andrea U the daughter 
of Eugene and Nancy Oatky. Jaaell b a ttudcnt In Mrs. 
Elizabeth's sixth grade reading ciasi. Andrea, a student in An- 
ne Sye's sixth grade reading class. 



Love Is... 

Love is warmth between two people. 
Love is compassion between two people. 
Love is people being together 
On a very special day like today! 

By Jennifer Briclthousc, 11, daughter of Gary and Jennie 
Morris. Jennifer Is a student in Mrs. Elizabeth Halslead's sixth 
grade class. 

Snow 

When it snows, I like to play in the snow like a 
butterfly washing his hands in the snow aitd going 
under the snow. The snow is fun because you can 
do so many things in the snow. 

By Victor Ellis, S, son of Mary Alice Ellis. Victor is a student in 
Mrs. Cheryl Oliver's second grade class. 



Virginia Beach Englbh Icachen arc invited and encouraged to submit completed examples of student creative writing to The 
Virginia Beach Sun for possible pubUcadon. Exanplcn mwl ladudc the student's complete name, age, grade levri and parents' com- 
plete name. Also include the compleU name of the student's English teacher and the school's name. Mali submissions to The Virginia 
Beach Sun, 138 S. Roacmont Road, Virglida Beach, VA, 23452. For more information call 4«6-343«. Deadline for each Wednesday's 
edition is the Friday before. 



Precinct Report 



Man Hangs Himself After Being Arrested For DUI 



Fdlowing are srane of the criminal activities 
reported in the last week in each of the city's three 
pc^ce precincts. 

First Precinct, covering 
Blackwater, Fungo, Princess Anne 

and Kempsville Boronghs. 
Captain M. E. Beanc in command. 

"The big thing over the weekend was a rape," 
said Capt. Beane. The incident took place in the 
Uberty Wdge secticm near Green Ran on Friday, 
Feb. 4 at approximately 8:30 p.m. The assaUant, 
who fled on foot, is wanted for burglary, rape and 
assault. InvestigaticHi is continuing. 

Bean also reported a rash of calls to investigate 
destructioi of property cases. "Between 10 p.m. 
and 2 a.m., the majority of which occurcd on 
Saturday night, there were 16 cases," said Beane, 
who added the susperts were "probably" high 
school students "out having a few drinks, looking 
for things to tear up." Police are investigating, 
according to Beane, who added that anyone with 
information can call the poUce department's 911 
emergency number. TTie incidents took place in 
Plaza, Kempsville and College Pwk. 

Additionally, Beanc said, there were 18 
residential burglaries over the weekend. 

Second Prednct, covering 

eastern half of Lynnhave, and 

Virginia Beach Boroaglis. 

Captain W. W. Baker In command. 

"It was an average busy weeland," swd Capt. 
Baker. "We averaged M) calls per day." 

On Saturday, Feb. 5 there were 13 domcsac 
disputes and 12 public nuisance calls investi- 

"Tliese generally invdved disorderiy and 
drunken kids in bars," said Baker, adding, "we 
had two fights in bars." 

AdditionaUy. Baker said, the Second precraa 
responded to nine accidents, five larcemes. four 
residential burglaries and three destruction of 

property calls. , . . . 

«^About the biggest thing we had was a 
sc^called armed robbery atthe Seven^tevcn irt 
the corner of V/db^ W^ *fd Q«at hteA 
RoMl " said Baker, "fhe suspect brandished a 
meia^ object, but we #»'t know if he h«l a kmfe 



or just a short piece of metal. In any event, ail he 
got was a minca- amount of money and two honey 
buns." 

Third Prednct, covering 

Bayside and western half 

of I^BBhaven boroughs. 

Captain A.E. Smith in command. 

AccOTding to U. H.J. Coeffield, the following 
inddents were investigated by Third Precinct 
officers: 

•Indecent exposure in the 4500 block of \lrglnia 
Beach Blvd., which is Pembroke Mall. Pdice are 
locridng for a six foot-tall male, of slender build, 
mth a beard, who was wearing a green fitted 
^cket. 

, 'Armed robbery in the 800 block of Baker Road, 
which is Medco Drugs. Pdice are looking for a 
black male, of medium height and build, with a 
mustache and stained teeth. He was wearing an 
dive drab jacket, blue jeans and sunglasses, and 
was brandishing an automatic pistol. 

•One residential burglary in the 700 block of 
Alibcy AKh. 

Three commercial burglaries in the 2700 block 
of Vlfginta BcMh Bookvard, in the 3300 block of 
Virginia Beadi Bookvard, and in the SlOO block 
of Ocveland Street. 

Uniform Divlsloa Sapport Bnrean, ladn«ttiv 
SWATopcratkas, di^dlBtiiriHUKCS, K-9cor|M, 
HeUcopter ai^ Buuiae patrols, oriaK prevcntloa 
aad awdysb. Ciptatai. T.V. Irving In ammami. 

"There was nothing of great significance this 
weekend," reported Irving. "Most of our 
manpower was spent at a beachfront fire at The 
Avdoa Motel. We were called in to handle traffic 
and to keep thmgs running smoothly." 

On Friday, Irving reported, a man arrested by 
an officer in the Unifom Division Support Bureau 
hung himself while in the city's jdl. Tix man, 
arrested by rootoreyck officer W.D. Willhoite, 
was arrested for Driving Uider the Influence, and 
was promuntxd (kad upon arrival at Bayside 
Hospital. 

Irving added that tl« K-9 coriM was used to 
break up a bar fight. 

Lt. E. E. Rorrer reported that there have been 
179 DUI arr^U in Virginia Beach thus far in 1983. 



Students 

Call 

Whitehurst 



Seccmd District Con- 
gressman G. William 
Whitehurst will once 
again take his "Dial Your 
Congressman" program 
into the high schools of 
Virginia Beach, beginning 
on Wednesday, Feb. 9. 

By May 2, each of the 
seven public high schools 
in the city will have had an 
opportunity to "visit" 
with Whitehurst. 

The program uses an 
amplified telephone 

hookup between a location 
in the school with the 
Congressman's office in 
Washington, D.C. Stu- 
dents are able to ask 
Whitehurst questions 
about pending legislation, 
about other governmental 
matters, or about any 
matter that is concerning 
them. Through loud- 
speakers, an entire class 
is able to hear his 
answers. > 

Mr. Whitehurst has 
made the program avail- 
able for the past several 
years in both Virginia 
Beach and Norfolk. Usual- 
ly, senior government 
class students attend the 
hour-long sessions held in 
the library or student 
activity room of each high 
school. 

Teachers and students 
alike say they appreciate 
the opportunity to talk 
directly with their Con- 
gressman, and White- 
hurst has confided to 
school officials that he 
enjoys the sessions as 
much as the students do. 
In fact, on several occa- 
sions, students have 
arrived for the pre- 
arranged telephone con- 
versation only to find that 
Congressman Whitehurst 
is there in person. He says 
he prefers the face-to-face 
sessions and that he 
makes every effort to 
make a personal appear- 
ance when he happens to 
be in Virginia Beach at the 
time a school is schedul- 
ed. 

The Feb. 9 program will 
be at Cox High School; 
Feb. 28 at Bayside; March 
7 at Princess Anne; March 
22 at Green Run; i^ril 5 
at Kempsville; April 18 at 
Kellam; and May 2 at 
First Cdonial. 



Miss 

P.A. 

Pageant 

Winners 



¥€^<3f The People 



What Does Valentine's Day Mean To You? 




"It Is a lime for 
thinking about people 
you care about. In some 
way, you show them that 
they mean something to 
you. I guess we could do 
without It, but I feel that 
the day b very Impor- 
tant. In fact, I'd say It is 
necessary. Maybe, 
though. It should come 
In a month other than 
February. ..maybe In 
April or l\f ay." 

Catherine Turpin, 

housewife, 

nine-year residoit 



"Valentine's Day is 
for the kids. We don't 
celebrate It as a family. 
You don't need Valen- 
tine's Day to say, 7 love 
you.' It's just like some 
of these other holidays 
they've invented like 
Grandparents Day and 
Mother-in-law's Day. I 
think everybody is 
making holidays more 
commercial than they 
need to. I just got over 
Christmas, and now 
they're hitting me 
Qgtdn. " 

.Vicki Simmons, 

student, 

seven month resident 



"To me, Valentine's 
Day Is basically tod 
commercial. It Is 
designed to sell cards and 
to seU love. I don 'l think 
It has as much Importan- 
ce as the card manufac- 
turers seem to stress. 
Anybody can find love 
and happiness In this 
world. You don't need 
Valentine's Day for 
that. " 

Sue Cindric, 

student, 

seven month resident 



Continental Appoints Smith 



William L Smith has 
been appcnnted as CKrec- 
tor-Telephcme Services for 
the Virginia Divisioi of 
Continental Telephone. 

Smith is responsible for 
the Virginia Division's 
Rione Fairs and business 
offices, installation and 
repair, cable mainte- 
nance service center and 
switching ' equipmit'ht 
offices. 

Since 1977, Smith has 
been Division Customer 
Service Manager in 
Mechanics ville. He jdned 
Continental in 1953 and 
has held several positions 
in Goucester, Warsaw, 
Emporia, Haymarket and 
Mechanicsville including 
combinatioi man, division 
manager, manager oper- 
aticms. district manager 
and district plant mana- 
ger. 

Smith served in the 
United States Army from 



1945 to 1946. 

Smith is a member and 
past master of Masonic 
Lodge #20 in Mathews 
and a member and past 
high priest of the Royal 
Arch in Urbanna. He is a 
member of the Mathews 
Lions Club, Oriental 
Chapter #30 of the Order 
of the Eastern Star in 
Mlthews, American 
Legion and Mathews 
Yacht Qub. Smith is a 
member of Richmond 
Commandery #2 Knights 
Templar. He is also a 
member of the Central 
Methodist Church in 
Mathews. 

Smith and his wife, 
Mary Wade, live in 
Mechanicsville. 

Smith's new position is 
the result of Continental's 
new management reorga- 
nization, effective Janu- 
ary 1. According to E. 
Lacy Yeatts, public affiurf 



coordinator, the two most 
significant changes are 
the creation of a telephone 
services department and 
the consolidation of geo- 
graphic serving areas. 

Network Services and 
customer services com- 
bined to fcN'm telephone 
services. , 

Hw l^one company 
structured its . 92 
exchanges into three 
management districts. 
The northern district con- 
sists of the Harrisonburg, 
Manassas and Wood- 
bridge serving areas. The 
southern district consists 
of Franklin, Emporia, 
Chase City and Amherst 
serving areas. The east- 
em district consistjt of 
Chancellor, Stafford, 
Bowling Green, Warsaw, 
Gloucester, Smithfleld 
aiKi Princess Anne serv- 
ing areas. 




Pulling 



By Lora Leigh Mathews 
Sun Correspondent 

The Keyette Qub of Princess Anne High Schod 
recently presented the 23rd Annual Miss P.A. Pageant. 

The opening number, whkh was presented by all 12 
<rf the cOTtestants, was a dance to the theme of the 
pageant - "FAME". Mrs. Susan Long, an English 
teacher at Princess Anne who has been dandng for 25 
years, choreographed the caning number. She has 
had much experience in ch«eographing fcs musicals 
and piays in Virginia Beach, both in private practice 
and as directs of the Espirit Modern Dance Company. 

The Second Runner Up was Renee Fizer, the 
daughter of Mr. and Mn. Kenneth N. Fizer. She is a 
5*2" senior with blue eyes and brown hair. After 
graduating in June, Renee plans to attend Texas 
Christian University in Ft. htorth and ni*jw in BaUet. 
Renee presently instructs Balkt at the King's Grant 
Academy of Dmix. She revived a trophy, flowers and 
a S50 savings bond. 

The First Runner Up was Keliie Janine I^irsons. the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William H. I^rsons. She is a 
5'5" juniOT with brown eyes and brown hair. Kellie 
would like to go to New York after she graduates next 
year aiKl try her luck on Broadway. Ste has performed 



at The Virginia Beach Little Theatre and most recently 
played in "Pippin" at the Tidewater Dinner Theatre. 
Kellie was the Third Runner Up in last years pageant 
and has taken dance, piano uid voice lessons. For Iwr 
talent she sang the broadway hit "New York, New 
York."5he received a trofrtiy, flowers and $75 savings 
bond. 

Miss Congeniality was Oetchen bxiise Sellers, 
daughter of Donald and Sharon Sellers. She is a 5'4" 
senior with green eyes and brown hair. Gretcten hopes 
to attend Virginia Comonwealth University this Wl and 
majOT in Fine Arts, spedficaUy in the areas of dance 
performing of techni<al theater and writing. She 
received a ixofkiy and flowers. 

Tlie winner of this yeara pageant was Pfcula Elkabeth 
Pulling, daughter of William and Maifaret Pulling. She 
is a S'l" senior with brown eyes and red hair. She 
hopes to attend the coUege (rf' WilMun and Mary in the 
fall and major in BusiiKss A<faniidstntk». Paula has 
tak^ dance, piano and vdce kssons and for her talent 
she played the piano and sang "U wu Almost Like 
Song." She rei^ived a trophy, flowers and a $100 
savings bond. 

The judging <rf the {Mgeant was bwed on beauty, 
taknt, and pdse. The judges were Benjamin Abraham, 
Nancy Creech, Barbara Lewis, Mary Ann Weathers and 
Brooks Williams. 



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16 Virginia Beach Sun, February 9. 1983 



Tht Church 
Is Th« Ptopl« 



Church Hews 



Th«P««pl« 
Ar« Hw CiNf rch 



*^Everyone Is Someone - In The Sight Of God'' 




church has the greatest 
product in the world, but 
the worse sales fwce." 
"The textile company 
spent a tremendous 
amount of money to 
advertise their cleaning 
product, but the Bible 
says the blood of Jesus 
Oirist cleanses us from all 
unrighteousness" says 
Rev. Holcomb and Jesus 
Christ is the greatest 
"spot" remover in the 
world." 

The church has a varied 
sports program which in- 
cludes skating trips, ski 



To win the Qty of 
Virginia Beach is a visicm 
of Rev. Jerry Holcomb, 
PastOT of Kings Grant 
Baptist Church. His 
church had the top five 
percent growth among the 
35,000 churches of The 
Southern Baptist Conven- 
tioi between 1970-19M. 

Rev. Holcomb says, a 
warm "spirit of love" 
atmosphere and evange- 
lism (outreach others for 
Christ) is a must fcx- any 
church and "christian 
fellowship is a necessity in 
a very impersonal world." 

His desire is to instill a 
small town spirit in a 
growing community by 




knowing their name and 
he wants his congregation 
to feel they are not just a 
number. 

By letting the people 
know you are there, Rev. 
Holcomb believes you 
reach anybody anywhere 
you can by any means that 
hcmo's Qirist. He related 
a stOTy of a President of a 
large textile chemical 
company stating "The 



trips, and other recreation 
outings. 

Pastor Holcomb has an 
active visitaticm program 
in which he try to visit 
each new family. As part 
of his open door policy • 
Rev. Holccmib says, "TTie* 
pastor needs to be real. 
We do not want gaps 
between me and the 
people. I am not a reli- 
gious performer but 



someone you can see and 
talk to." Rev. Holcanb 
ccHitinues, "I think what 
really matters is not 
whether this is a large (x 
small, wealthy, or pow, 
evangelistic or non- 
evangelistic church, but 
the underlying reality, is 
it a loving church? A 
loving church is gdng to 
grow, an unloving church 
is not. This is the very 
basis of the gospel "God 
is love." Jesus said "By 
these signs shall all men 
know that you're my 
deciples, that you love aie 
another." Interest speaks 
invdvement says Rev. 
Hdcomb as a need arises 
we want to meet it and 
find out; How can the 
church serve the need? 
The church must have 
form and organizaticm so 
new areas can be expir- 
ed. If the vision for Kings 
Grant Baptist is to ccm- 
tinue, the pastCM- must see 
things for the people and 
tell them what be sees." 
Pastor Holcomb looks 
ahead three to five years 
and hopefully the congre- 
gaticm grasps hold of the 
visictfi. 

A graduate of South- 
eastern Baptist Theologi- 
cal Seminary in Wake 
Forest, S.C, Rev. Jerry 
Hdcomb received a BA 
from the University of 
Georgia in 1963. Rev. 



Holcomb was called to 
serve the Kings Grant 
ccHnmunity on February 



29, 1968 and continues as 
their oastor today. 



"/ am not a religious performer but 
someone you can see and talk to. " 

Rev, Jerry Holcomb 




In The Beginning 



The first planning 
meeting held by the (tea- 
oons ai the Thalia Lynn 

Baptist Church to orgaa- 
ize a church in the Kings' 
Grant area wm on August 
4, 196S, and the first 
Sunday service was ccd- 
ducted by Rev. Bob 
Wallace in the Kingston 
Elementary School. 

A caU was extended to 
the Rev. Jerry Holcomb in 
February of 19M and he 
held his first service in 
June of that year. 

In July of 1968 a new 
building contract was 
authorized and drawn 
with Chewning, Goodwin 



and Hoggard. The first 
mamiag worship service 
was held in the present 
location October 5, 1969. 
Since then. King's 
Grant Baptist Church has 

gone through four new 
building [vogniitt includ- 
ing a new edtMatlonal 
building, an enlarged 
sanctuary, additional 
mobile class, rooms and 
even more educational 
building enlargement. 

Present i^aiu by Rev. 
Holc(Hnb include 4he 
possible building of a new 
education building to 
double Sunday School 
caiMdty. 



CHURCH BULLETINS 



Reverend Jerry HoicoiBb 



Ktags Gnut Baptist CtaRh 

On Sunday February 13, 7 p.m. a film series 
featuring Joyce LandOTfs "His Stubborn Love" 
will address such topics as: 

How to have a fulfilling marriage, overcoming 
grief and depression, surviving your suffering, 
does God answer prayer and help! I'm a parent. 

OpoiDoorCluipcl 

On February 16, and 17 at 7 p.m. Ken SumnUl 
will be speaking. 



Building A House Does Not make A Home 



This is 601 Meadow Lane — someone's dreamhouse on the 
way to fulfillment. Yet the poet reminds us that no house 
becomes a home the minute a family moves in. 

It takes a heap of livin' 

And something more it takes. Our living needs the firm 
undergirding of faith of God. Our days require aim and 
purpose which religious conviction alone can inspire. 

Down the hill is a vital center of this community. At the 
neighborhood church scores gather each week for worship, 
for spiritual renewal. 

Just you watch. One morning several months hence 
you'll see the family from 601 Meadow Lane head down 
the hill to worship. And you'll know someone's 
dreamhouse is on the way to becoming their dreamhome. 




Sunday 

Mark 

16:1-11 



Monday 

Luke 
24:13-35 



Tuesday 

Luke 
24:50-53 



Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


1 Corinthians 


Romans 


Rwnans 


Romans 


15:1-11 


9:1-29 


9:30 


10:5-21 






10:4 







i 







Kings Grant Baptist Chnrcli 

873 Little Neck Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 



SUNDAY 
Moraiig Wonkip . . . S.-M turn. 

SMday School MOaJi. 

Suday Sdraoi. .... l9Mm.m. 
Moratac WonUp . . IIM sjb. 
i^rcatagWoniyp ...IMpjm. 



WEDNESDAY 
fmMs NlgM DtaMr. fcM p.m. 

CMn. •:Mp.a. 

PnqwSmln fc4Spji. 



Jerry Holcomb, Pastor 
3404mZ 



Cedar KoeJ. ^669mol^ of yod 




•1« CEDAR ROAD 

GREAT MIOOE 

CHESAPEAKE, VIROtlHA t»» 

TELEPHOME M7-(U1 pr ta-UXi 



Morally Wonhip 

(Jwrior Cbarch) 10.00 a.m. 

EvM^Mk Service .... 7:00 p.m. 
TMiiar Yoaiq AiIhIU. . 7:30 p.m. 
WedMiday Fmliy Nighl7:30 p.m. 



+ 



Q^/rsi(^apiis/ &hurch 





Oi 



r/i 



Ken Hemphill, Pastor 



312 KenptvUk Bond, Norfolk, V*.. 23502 461-M39 



Now Available 
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^> PROVIDENCE ROAD - VIRCWIA BEACH, VIRGIHI* V' 

I A,i.j,,„ i[,rd...« M.«);.ja^ U.J iui..... 5(.4<. 'Iwuii 

Pastor: Rev. John R. Carraway 
Phone 424-2276 



CALVARY 

ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

492S Providence Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Leonard Campbell, Pastor 

495-1004 
Youth L.I.F.E. Saturday, 7 P.M. 




4«riimmiiiQN TD fnENMfirs 

IMDIAMRIVIR 

BAPmrcmmcH 

I600l.aw«f4if«MM 

PImte W. McSwiOn, Jr, Pastor 
424S700 



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Virginia Beach Sun, February 9. 1983 17 



K". 



Guide To Virginia Beach 



iaued 



(^olCecilou 



Yesterdays' 

Tresisures 

Todays* 

Handicrafts^ 
"tomorrows' — 

Heirlooms 



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317 S.Witchduck Road 

1/4 delightful trip into the 
ipasi with J8lh century 
I reproductions and antiques. 
IfVe carry something for 
[ everyone from Stieff 
Pewter and Baldwin Brass , 
to beautiful Madison I 
Square furniture. Alsot 
country items like candles,^ 
folk art, primitive pain- 
tings, etc... gift items of tt\ 
wide variety. Hours 10 til 5 
J daily. I til 5 Sun. Closed 
[Wed. 



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Jonkm *i Cmmtry Shop 
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5. The Lady Peddler 

6. Mountain Crafts 

iiiiill 



7. Grandma 's A ttic. Inc. 

8. Carraway House 



1 8 Virginia Beach Sun. February 9, 1 9g3 



Virainia Beach Public Notices 



Amarioan 
RedCroai 




WUHelp. 



You can count on us. 

We help when disaster strikes. 

During fires, floods, hurricanes and tornadoes. 

We help with food, clothing, health care and a 
place to stay. 

We help when folks need blood. t 

We help the elderly. 

We help expectant parents prepare for their baby. 

We help veterans receive all their benefits. 

We'll teach you how to check blood pressure. 

We'll teach you CPR, swimming and first aid. 

We're the American Red Cross. 

People helping people. 

Everyone working together to improve things 

in your community. 

That's what Red Cross exists for. 

Join Red Cross. 

We'll help. Will you? 



[ 



J 



I][ 






Virginia: In the Clerk's 
Uffrcc of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Norfolk on 
the 21st day of January, 
1983. 

Joseph James Cotton vs. 
Ethel Minett Lassister 
Cotten, Defendant. 



The object of this suit is 
for the complainant to ob- 
tain from the defendant a 
divorce a vinculo 



matrimonii upon the 
grounds of one year 
separation without 
cohabitation or interrup- 
tion. 

An affidavit has been 
made and filed that the 

Tester 

Hugh L. Stovall, Clerk 

Gwendolyn K-Mayo, 

D.C. 

Arthur G. McGowan p.q. 

181-124T2/I6VB 



+ 



Wfe11HelpNMlI\6i^ 



RadCroaa 



I* *uMiC Itmcf elTM Ww n mr 
4 Th« Atfutntiiia Council 



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USE THIS FORM 
TO SUBSCRIBE TO 

THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 

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PHONE. 



WITHIN TIDEWATER AREA 

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The r^ular meeting of the City Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building. Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia on Monday. February 
28, 1983, at 7:00 p.m. at which time the following ap- 
plications will be heard: 



CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordinance upon Application of 6. R. McBride 
Trust, Robert G. McBride, Trustee, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community Business District to A-2 Apartment District 
on the South side of Shore Drive beginning at a point 
2100 feet more or less East of Diamond Spring Road, 
running a distance of 213 feet along the South side of 
Shore Drive, running a distance of 375 feet along tht 
Eastern property line, running a distance of 3600 fe^ 
more or less along the Southern property line (Northern 
boundary of Lake Smith) and running a distance of 600 
feet along the Western property line. Said parcel is 
located at 5451 Shore drive and contains 2.7 acres. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of Wayen Beagle for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residoitial District to R- 
8 Residential District on certain property located on the 
East side of Greenwell Road banning at a point 550 
feet more or less South of Powells Point Road, running 
a distance of 222.95 feet along the East side of Green- 
well Road, running a distance of 115 feet along the 
Southern property line, running a distance of 100.57 
feet in a Northerly direction, running a distance of 18.43 
feet in a Westerly direction, running a distance of 87.33 
feet in a Northeriy direction and running a distance of 
120 feet along the Northern property line. Said parcel 
contains 22,433 square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

3. An Ordinance upon Application of Lewis W. and 
Rose S. Breedlove for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from R-4 Residential 
District to O-l Office District on certain pr(^)erty 
located on the South side of Wildwood Drive beginning 
at a point 172 feet East of First Colonial Road, running 
a distance of 100.48 feet along the South side of Wild- 
wood Drive, running a distance of 170 feet along the 
Eastern property line, running a distance of 116 feet 
along the Southern property line and running a distance 
of 170.79 feet along the Western property line. Said 
parcel contains 18,443.5 square feet more or less. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMITS: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

4. An Ordinance upon Application of Creative 
Displays, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for two 12' X 25' billboards on property located on the 
West side of Rosemont Road, South of the Virignia 
Beach-Norfolk Expressway on Lots 17 thru 25, Block O 
and Lots 13 thru 27, Block R, Rosemont. Said parcels 
contain 2.5 acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

5. An Ordinance upon Application of Creative 
Displays, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for two 10.5' X 36' billboards on certain property 
located on the South side of Holland Road beginning at 



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CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



20 words or less • $4.40. Additional words • 22« each. 
Please print clearly using one word per box. 









































4.40 


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5.28 


5.S0 


572 


5.94 


6.16 


6.38 


6.60 



Please run ad for 

Mall to: 

Byerly Publications 

P.O. BOX 1527 

Chesapeake, va. 23320 



Issues, or until cancelled ( ). 



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Number times to run 
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Name 

Address 
City 



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ALL CLASSIFIED AOS RUN M THC CHESAPEAKE POST AND TW VMCMNA BEACH SUN. 

For help with YOiir cteMl f ted ad. pImm cat 547-4571. 



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Fast 

Through 
The 

Classified 
Ads 



a point 200 feet more or less East of Rosemont Road, 
running a distance of 1 100 feet more or less along the 
South side of Holland running a distance of 852.14 feet 
along the Eastern property line, running a distance of 
641.52 feet along the Southern property line and run- 
ning a distance of 870 feet along the Western property 
line. Said parcel conuins 17.401 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Application of Creative 
Displays, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for one 10.5' x 36' billboard on certain property located 
on the West side of Holland Road beginning at a point 
250 feet South of Stoneshore Road, running a distance 
of 270.53 feet along the West side of Holland Road, 
running a distance of 450 feet alcmg the Southern pmpa- 
ty line, running a distance of 520.12 feet along the 

- Eastern iM'operty line, running a distance of 280.S2 feet 
along the South side of Stoneshore Road, running a 
distance of 250.03 feet in a Southeasterly direction and 
irunning a distance of 168.46 feet in a Northeasterly 
direction. &ud parcel contains 4.405 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon Application of Holiday Village, 
Inc.. ^ R. M. Bosher and R. C. Bosher for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for an automobile service 
station with convenience store and registration office on 
certain property located on the West side of General 
Booth Boulevard beginning at a point 190 feet South of 
South Birdneck Road, running a distance of 210.5 feet 
along the Wnt side of General Booth Boulevard, run- 
ning a disunce of 151.68 feet along the Southern 
pr(q)erty line, running a disunce of 186.67 feet along 
the Western property line and running a distaiKX of 
135.58 feet aloqi the Northern property line. Said par- 
cel contains 28.357.5 square feet. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

8. An Ordinance upon Application of Douglas and Pat 
Perry for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a single 
family dwelling in the AG-1 Agricultural District on cer- 
tain |H-operty located 2200 feet more or less North of 
London Bridge Road beginning at a point 4224 feet 
more or less West of Oci^na Boulevard, running a 
distance of 443.01 feet along the Western property line, 
running a distance of 1040.13 feet along the Northern 
property line, running a distance of 466.66 feet along 
the Eastern property line and running a distance of 
933.28 feet along the Southern property line. Said parcel 
contains 10 acres. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

'^SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
PUNGO BOROUGH: 

9. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
r^ard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Patrick W. Bruzzese. Pr(q)erty 
located on the North side of Pungo Ferry Road, 640 feet 
more or less West of Carmel Street. Plats with more 
detailed information are available in the Department of , 
Planning. PUNGO BOROUGH. 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

10. Kppui from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for James N. Belote, III. Property 
located on the East side of Woodstock Road, 720 feet 
more or less North of Providence Road. Plats with more 
detailed information are {urailable in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLHBOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL US^RMIT: 

VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 

11. An Ordinance upon Application of Hudgins and 
Associates for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 3 
duplexes at the Northwest comer of Parks Avenue and 
13th Street on the Western 100 feet of Lots 22 thru 27, 
Block 111, Lakewood. said parcels contain 15,500 
square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 
AMENDMENTS: 

12. Motion of the Planning commission of the City of 
Viiiinia Beach, Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 
2, Section 200(c) of the Comprehensive Zoning Or- 
dinance pertaining of lots of unusual depth. More 
detailed information is available in the Department of 
Planning. 

13. Motion of the Planning Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach. Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 
9, Section 901(a) of the Comprehensive Zoning Or- 
dinance pertaining to use regulations in the B-1 
Businns-Residential District. More detailed infor- 
mation is available in the Department of Planning. 
Plats with more detailed information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited to attend., 
Ruth Hodges Smith 
CityCterk 
185-7 2T 2/16 VB ^^^ 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virgiiya Beach Board of Zoning Appeals will cm- 
dtKt a Public Hearing on Wednesday, February 16, 
im, at 7:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers of the aty 
HaU ^lilding. Municipal Cento-. Virginia Beadi, 
Virginia. The staff briefing wiU be at 6:45 p.m. in the 
aty Manager's Conference Romn. The fdlowing »p- 
plications will ^>pear on the agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 

1 . Frank and Betty Jamison requests a variance to allow 
parUni of major recroitional equiiment in front of a 
building instead of behind the nearest p<Hii<Hi of a 
bulldint adjacoit to a public strMt on Lot 53. Westview 
vmage. 732 Arvin Road. KenapsviUe Borough. 

2. Oui F. Ste^^ns requests a variance to allow paridng 
of m^or recreaticmid equipment in front of a building 
inrteid of bdiind the nearest portion of a buikling ad- 
jacent to a public street on Lot 138, Section 3. Sun- 
tOtam Park, 3952 Sunstream Parkmiy. KemjMville 
Borou^. 

3. William Ru»ell Catlin requesu a variance to allow 
pKtaim of nuuor reoeational equipnmit in frtmt of a 
birfldint instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
bidkttnf adjacent to a public street on UA 13, Uock 1. 
SectiM 2. Pocahontas Village, 4960 NarragaMett 
Drive. Kdnpsvi& Borcnigh. 

4. La Qttinu Motet Inns, Inc. requests a variance of 134 
aquare feet of agn area to 284 squve feet of li^ um 
bMead of ISO squwe feet of spi area as alknved ud to 
aUow the free-landing sign to be 14^ square feet per 
face instead of 125 squan feet pa- face as altowed tm a 
nvod. Fair Meactows, Newtown Road. KanpsviOe 
borough. 



5. Jackie Mckinney requestt a variance to 9.2 feet to a 

20.8 foot front yard setback instead of 30 feet as 
required (residoitial addition - porch) on Lot 13, Block 
2, boulevard Manor, 287 Toy Avenue. Kempsville 
iBwoufh. 

6. Gary A. Weaver requesu a variance of 8.5 feet to a 
1.5 foot side yard and rear yard setback instead of 10 
feet each as required (accessory building - storage shed) 
on Lot 4, Block 0, Lake Front Village, 2121 Kimball 
Circle. Bayaiik Borough. 

7. C. P. Holland, Jr. by J. Peter Holland requests a 
variance of 0.3 feet to a 9.7 foot front yard setback in- 
stead of 10 feet as previously grants by the Board of 
Zoning Appeals on June 5. 1974 on Lot 1 , Block 8, Sec- 
tion E, Cape Henry. 200 71st Street. Lynnhavpn 
Borough. 

8. A. W. Vaedi, Jr. requesu a variance of 39.1 feet to a 

10.9 foot front yvd setback instead of 50 feet as 
required (2nd story ackUtion) the weston 108 feet of 
Lot 220, North Unkhom Park Extended, 1112 Rose 
Lane. Lynnhaven BtHOugh. 

9. Swanberg CmporaUon requests a variance to allow 
parking in the required 10 foot setbacks from both 9th 
Street and Medit«ranean Avoiue where prohibited and 
to waive the requhed landscaping in the setbacks where 
required on LoU 1, 3. 5, and 7, Block 38, Shadowlawn 
Heighu, Northwest comer of Mediterranean and 9th 
Street. Virginia Beach Borough. 

10. Mast Brothers, Iik requesu a variance of .50 feet to 
a 9.50 foot side yard setback instead of 10 feet as 
required (north side) on Lot 29, Block B, Phase 2, 
Chatham Hall, 1105 Mccklen Lane. Kempsville 
Borough. 

11. George Herb^ Ferrdl requesU a variance of 13 
parking spaces to "0" parking spaces instead of 13 
parking spaces as required (medical clinic) on Lots 16 
and 18, Block 52, Virginia Beach Development Com- 
pany, ^ 23rd Street, Virginia Beaqh Borough. 

12. Seashore Mana^ment, Ltd. and Burlage Cor- 
poration requesu a variance to allow 1 14 parking spaces 
to be 7.5 feet in widtii by 18.5 feet in length instead of 9 
feet in width by 20 feet in loigth as required and to 
allow 20 foot wi^ aisles instead of 22 feet in width as 
required for parkii^ at a 90 d^ree angle (279 parking 
space lot) on LoU 11 through 22, Block 9, Virginia 
Beach Development Onporation, 801 AUantic Avenue. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

13. J. Christie Davenport requesU a variance of 4.4 feet 
to a 15.6 foot front yard setback (Ocean View Avenue) 
instead of 20 feet as required and of 5 feet to a 3 foot 
side yard setbadc (west side) instead of 8 fMt as required 
(2nd story addition) on Lou 9 and 10, Block 17, 
Chesq>eake Park. 4824 Bay Bridge Lane. Bayside 
Borough. 

14. Runnlngton Investmoit Corporation requests a 
variance of 2 feet to a 6 foot side yard setback (south 
side) iiutead of 8 feet as required (fireplace) on Lot C, 
Block 24, Thalia Acres, Pabn Avenue. Kemjitsville 
Borou^. 

15. Runnington Investment Corporation requests a 
variance of 2 feet to a 6 foot side yard setback (north 
side) iiutead of 8 feet as required (firephux) on Lot D, 
Block 24, Thalia Acres, Pabn Avenue. Kempsville 
Borough. 

16. Runnlngton Investment Corporation requesu a 
variance of 2 feet to a 6 foot side yard setback (south 
side) instead of 8 feet as required (fireplace) on Lot E, 
Block. 24, Thalia Acres, Palm Avenue. Kempsville 
Boroiigh. 

17. Runnlngton Investment Corporation requests a 
variance of 2 feet to a 6 foot side yard setback (north 
side) instead of 8 feet as required (fireplace) on Lot F, 
Block 24, Thalia Acres. Pabn Avenue. Kempsville 

^ Borough. 

18. Runnington Investmoit Corporation requests a 
variance of 2 feet to a 6 foot side yard setback (north 
ride) instead of 8 feet as required (fireplace) on Lot 20, 
Uock 7, Thalia Acres, S. Pahn Avenue. Kempsville 
Borot^. 

19. Runnington Investnmit Corporation requesu a 
variance of 2 feet to a 6 foot ade yard setback (south 
side) instead of 8 feet as required (fireplace on Lot 21, 
Block 7. Thalia Acres, S. Pahn Avenue. Kempsville 
Borou^. 

DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1. Jdm W. Kdlam requesu a variance of 19,500 square 
feet of land area to 10,300 square feet to land area in- 
stead of 30,000 squve feet of land area as required and 
of 125 feet of lot width to 75 feet in width instead of 20 
feet of lo^ width as required for a muhiple-family 
devdoiwwnt on UM 16 and Eastern half of tot 1 8, Block 
38, Virginia Beadi Development Cwporation, 516 20th 
Street. Vhginia Bcadi Borough. 

2. McDonald's C(»pdraUon requesU a variance of 5 feet 
to a "0" s^lMck from the east i^operty line (Board- 
wtik) instead of 5 feet as required (patio cover) on Lou 
1. 2 and Smitittm iMlf of Lot 3, Block 69, Virginia 
Beadi Dev^qnnent Company, 2m AUantic Avenue. 
Viifinia Beach Borou^. 

3. R. H. Yates, Jr. reqnesU a variance of 2 parking 
spaces to "0" parUng qwces hutead of 2 parking 
qMoes'as required for a 2 unit addition on the Eastern 
40 feet of Lot 4, Block 60, Virguua Beach Development 
Conpany, 302, Uih ^reet. Virginia Bach Borough. 

4. M. M. Newton reqiMsU a variance of 2 feet to a 6 
foot ri(te yani sHback (nwth side) instead of 8 feet as 
required (ttodcs) <» Lot 6, Kock 54, Pelican Dunes, 
39S7 ami 3^9 W. Stnaf<»d StreA. Bayside Borough. 

5. M. M. Newt(Hi r^quesU a variance of 2 feet to a 6 
foot ride yard setback (south ride) instead of 8 feet as 
required (decks) on Lot 5, Block 54, PeUcan Dunes, 
3953 and 3955 W. Stratford Street. Bayside Borough. 

6. i.'ias and Nikolaos Theodoridis requesu a variance of 
7 feet o a "0" mhtek for a free-standing rign instead 
of 7 feei as required (to relocate a nonconforming free 
standing sign), on Lou 1 , 2, 6, 7 and Eastern 100 feet of 
a 20 foot lane. Block 76, Virginia Beach Development 
Company. 3208 Atiantic Avenue. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 

BOARD. 

G. L. IsdeU 

S^retary 

I85I2T2/9VB 



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Virminia Beach ^n. February 9, ^»M9 



m 



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■ 

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4.A«tM 



For me, 
line. She 
subline. 


there 
'smy 


s only one Vakth 
"Sugar" and she's 

Hezi 



Sure is lonely, ain 't it dear? 

Si^arhimps 



XMAS BILLS 

Or Any PnrpoM Realty Lmm 

Virgiaia-Nartli Canrfln 

Or MuyOtker Stain 

WITH GOOD CREDIT 

UP TO 100% OF VALUE 
REHNANCE MORTGAGES 

ltt,2ii4,or3fd'a 
In Mtnw caM* inleicit ai low at 

12% 

III. a 2a4. Mon|i«B ap 10 N m. 

BAD CREDIT 

UP TO M«i OF VALUE 
GUARANTEED APPROVAL 

Withmfflcicnleqal^ 

STOP FORECLOSURES 

PAY IRS>n;DGEMENTS 

TURNED DOWN 

BY OTHERS? DON'T GIVE UP 
We Have Private laoton 

COMMERCIAL 

Property Loans Also Available 

ALSO WILL BUY 

MORTGAGE NOTES 

OPEN TILL 8 PM 

SAT. 10 TILL 2 PM 

CAPITAL ASSOCIATES 

499-lS54.4«M2n 
LIEN 

INCOME TAX • and Account- 
ing (including tax audits). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Agent, 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd. (near 
Rosemont Rd.) Call 463-6608. 

ITFN 

JUNK CARS AND TRUOfS - 

Towed free. Some bought. Call 
4«-1961 or 483-5859. 
ITFN 

CREDIT PROBLEMS - Receive 
a Mastercard or Visa, Guaran- 
teed, bad credit no problem. For 
free brochure call House of 
Credit, toll free 1-800442-1531 
anytime. 

18T2-9 



THE BALLOOONERY 

Balloon Bouquets delivered in 
the Tidewater area. 583-8280, 9 
am til 5 pm, Monday thru 
Friday. 
1-4T-2/9 

NEED 28 people who would like 
to lose 7 to 15 pounds the ist 
week and 5 to 7 pounds per week 
thereafter. Only th serious need 
to qjply. Call 487-9605. 

14T2-23 

THE LOCK SHOP And Things - 
2981 South Military Highway, 
Chesapeake, Va., 485-1950. 
Complete 24 hour lockanith ser- 
vice. 

14T2-23 

CREDIT PROBLEMS? 

Reodve a Mastercard or Visa. 
Ouannteed, even if you have 
bad credit or have been 
bankrupt. Fm free brochure, 
said self addressed stamped en- 
velope to House of Credit, Box 
280570, Dallas, Texas. 75228 or 
call 214-324-3944 anytime. 
1-4T-2/9 



ICIMpWaRM 



BUICK - 1979, Lesabre LTD; air 
condltioii, powtt steering and 
brakes, tilt wheel, CB, am/fm 
stereo,, custom interior, 

5turgandy, electric windows, 
3,000 miles. $4993. Call 587- 
4893. 
4-4T-2/9 

AUSTIN MARINA ■ GT. 1974, 

very good condition, new inspec- 

Uon. AM/FM stereo, $1400. Call 

463-0618. 

^ 44T2-16 

CHEVROLET - I9«. Ciution. 
* door, 6 cyHBder, 4 speed, air, 
powo' steering and toakes. Well 
maintained. Can 463-<»01 . 
— 44T-2/9 

JEEPS, CARS, TRUCKS under 
$100 available at lo$al govern- 
ment sales in your area. Call 
(refundable) 1-619-569-0241 ext. 
8132 for your 1983 directory. 24 
hours. 
44T2-16 

BLAZER . 1977, big tires, 
AM/FM, CB radio combination, 
4 wheel drive, burgahdy and 
white. Owner will assist with 
financing. CaU 425-0909. 
41T2-16 

CHRYSLER - Cordoba, 1976. 
63,000 miles, sun roof, air, 
power stMring and brakes, good 
condition, must sell. $895. Call 
464-5522. 

4 if 2-9 

FORD - 1978. LTD II, radio, 
vinyl roof, automatic, clean, 
good condition, retail book value 
$2925, asking $2500. Call 482- 
2246. 

44T3-2 

DODGE • Colt, 1981, fully 
loaded. Rally Sport, 15,000 
miles. $4,600 or just assume 
ballance, 42 gallons per mile. 
Call 422-4824. 

4 IT 2-9 

CQUGAR • 1980, AM/FM 
cassette, air, 6 cyli|>ders 
automatic, $5,000 or best offer. 
CaU 397-4071. 

4 IT 2-9 

CAMERO • 1968, 6 cyUnder, 
automatic, Cilifornia clean. 
Very good condHion. $2000. Call 

42T2-I6 

TOYOTA ■ 1978, Owolla, low 
■mleage, good condition. $2950. 
CaU 48^1312. 

, 4 IT 2-9 

ARROW JET • 1979, 4 sp^, 30 
miles per gallon, 27,000, 
AM/FM cassette, 2 new tires, 
black interior, good condition. 
$3600. Call any Ume 480-20S2. 
41T2-9 

CADILLAC ■ 1976 Coupe 
DeViUe. Excellent condition. Ex- 
tra, extra dean. CaU 428-0068. 
44T3-2 

DODGE ■ 1975, Charger, 
autoutic, power ttceing and 
brakes, air. Mvst see. $1,230. 
CaU 833-2033. 

44T2-23 



SALES-PART TIME or full 
time, excdient earnings, poten- 
tial^th opportunity for advan- 
cemi^t in sales or - sales 
managnient. Must be mature, 
neat amft want to be a success. 
For an appointment call Bill 
Damone at 420-3469 or 468- 
3989. 

KHT-y9 

LEGAL SECRETARY • With 
expCTieoK, shorthand required. 
Ask for Mrs. Dailey. Call 399- 
5343. 

10412-16 

EXdJLLENT INCOME - for 
part time home assembly work, 
for more information call 504- 
641-8003 ext. 7699. 
104T2-I6 

PROCESS MAIL AT HOME - 
$30.00 per hundred! No ex- 
perience. Part or full time. Start 
immediately. Detwis, send self- 
addressed, stamped envelope. 
Haiku Distributors, 115 
Waipalani Rd.. Haiku, HI 
967(». 

lO-TFN 
UNDERCOVER WEAR Home 
Lingerie Party - As seen on P.M. 
Magazine and the Today show. 
Ladies have a party and receive 
free lingerie or become an agent, 
unlimited earnings potential. 
Call Belinda at 487-4709 after 6 
call 422-1408. 
24T2-16 

PART TIME To Market A Ne* 
Wei^t Management Program - 
Be introduced to a leading 
nutrition company. No door to 
door. Training provided. Call 
545-5274. 

10 4T 2-16 

$240.20 WEEKLY Paychecks 
(FuUy Guaranteed) working in 
the comfort and security of your 
own home. No experience. All 
areas. Paychecks fully guaran- 
teed. Complete details and ap- 
plication form sent on request. 
Send a self-addressed, stamped 
envelope to: AH Box 2613, 
Christiansburg, VA 24060. 
I0 3T2-9 

TELEPHONE SALES - Mor- 
ning hours, salary and bonuses. 
No experience necessary. We 
trail), Great for students apd 
■Z houssvi^yfis^, qsjl Jiij-Am.. ... 
lOTFN 



ll.PMHiMisWmM 



l3.Ptto 



CAIHLLAe • 1979 Fleetwood 
Brou«han, loaded, excellent 
condition, black, $8200 or best 
ofl^er.CaM«5-4332. 

44TM6 



2.fwn9Mk 



7. 



ORIENTAL GIRLS seek 
Amaican men for fHencbhip, 
marriage. Individual introdmcr 
tions. Information, photos $2. 
Equator, Box 57031 1-A15, 
Miami, FLA. 33157. 
2-4T-2/9 



RECQVE A MASTEKIARD 

OR Visa. Guaranteed, wAody 
refused; for free brochure caU 
House of Credit, toU free 1-800- 
442-1331 anytime. 
. 2TFN 

CREDIT PROBLEMiSr - 

Receive a Mastmard or Visa 
Guaranteed, even If yo» lave 
tNui oedit. No cretfit or have 
been bankrupt. For free 
brochure, send self stamped en- 
velope to House of Credit, Box 
^570, IMlas, Tx. 57228 or call 
214-324-3944. 
1 ^J - P9 



4. Mm 



3 



CWIVriTE - 1»2. white with 
red intnrar, smoked ^as tops, 
fidly equipped. AU avattrtle op- 
tions. C^ 463-3637. 
44T^2^ 

Fmm- 1968 Mrtanf, tmOmA. 
Motm-, trannnbaon, and rov 
Old in v>od Atpa. Body needs 
rqwir. $100 a^nMrie. Ctf 313- 
2340. 

44T2-23 



YAIti4IIA • mi, 630a;, ex- 
cdlent conditioa, low anlcatc, 
runs real good, looks peat, must 
see to appreciate. $1,600. CaU 
461-0962. 
7-fT-y9 

W)NDA • 1779 GL 1000 - ttack 

tiUh lold tria. Cee^liete tour 

kit, AM/FM caasette Upe 

idayer. Cnuse controi. Gwafe 

kept, 11.300 miles. $3,500. CaD 

347-MI3aflCT5p.m. 

- 7TFN 

SVZVia - IMI. RM-lOO, CNrt 
BUte, only ridto a cou|de of 
nKHHlis. Good condititm. S700 
or be* offer. Can *v» «5-«44 
or evenings 547-4779. 
74T3-2 

HONDA - 1979, CM«OT. 8.00D 
miles, garage keirt, excellent 
eonfidon, mny extras iaduinv 
ri^ wit. ioid new for fl995 
ttkii^ $I3K or ^c^ '^'B- ^^ 
424-3£n. 

72T2-9 



15. 



19.llc]Mb« 



32. BmhwM For INirt 



42.CliiMCwt 



51. Patatinf 



DISHWASHER - Needs gasket. 
$23. Call 420-7719. 

- 15 Tl^ 

G. E. 30" ELECTRIC RANOfe 

white, $93, 36" gas range, cop- 

pertoite, $130, 30 day wjutent;^ 

on both. 14 cubic foot Cold Spot 

refrigerator, coopertone, Sl7S. 

Call Tumbleweed Tradng Co. 

543-5085. 

1 5 4T 1-29 

DISHWASHER - Sears Ken- 
more, porMile. Good condition. 
$100. Call 587-0275. 
J5IT2-9 

STOVES - Electric, cleiin, 
guaranteed, $50 and up. CaU 
anytime. 857-6552. 

1J4T3-2 



GIRLS BIKES - 20 inch, $15. 10 
spe«l $35. 5 speed $25. Call 420- 
7719. 

19 WTFN 



STORES AND STORAGE areas 
- All sizes. Properties unlimited. 
Marvin Goldfarb. 399-8390, 484- 

1275. 

32TFN 



tH. MwicBl ImtnuMMts 



ORGAN • Kimball Swinger 600, 
good condition, $575. CaU 421- 
3852. 

20 4T 2-23 



33. ApartHifiits F«r Rtnt 



21.T«ltvislMi/Stw«» 



SEARS STEREO - AM/FM, 8 
U-ack, turn table. $50. Call 420- 
7719. 

2I4TTFN 



22.J«Mlry 



APARTMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS - Great Bridge. 4 
locations, one and 2 bedroom 
aparlmenis. From $260. Rental 
office, 482-3373, evenings 482- 
1492. 369 Johnstown Road. 
33TFN 

GREEN RUN - In Virginia 
Beach, Apartments for adults. 1 
and 2 bedroom Garden Style and 
2 bedroom townhouses. We pay 
heat and hot water. The Pines. 
Call 468-2000. 
33- TFN 



BABYSITTING - My home in 
East Little Creek, fenced yard, 
playroom, low rales. Call 480- 
1932. 

42 412-16 

CHILDCAHE - My home. You 
bring lunch. Reasonable rates. 
Lots of toys. Call anytime 340- 
2323. 

42IT2-9 

BABYSITTING > My home 
(College Square Shop area). All 
ages, any hour available, 
reasonable rates, by the hour or 
week. Call 424-5902. 

42 IT 2-9 



PAINTING - Urge or small 
jobs, interior and exterior. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
prices. References available upon 
request. Commercial work also 
done, and light carpentry and 
wallpapering experience. Call 
397-5483 or 484-1423. 

51 TFN 



52. Pfwtegrapliy 



47. Hmm ImprovwMnt 



16.ArtielMF«rS«lt 



SWIMMING POOL SLIDE - 

$250, Galvinized Big T Gym set, 
$20. 3 by 5 bUck slate black 
board, $15. Call 420-7719. 

' 16 TFN 

SHERWIN WILLIAMS PAINT 

Retails for $22, wiU sell for $7 a 
gallon. New Vinyl shutters 43" 
to 79'. $7 to $13 a pair. Tumble- 
weed Trading Co. 343-5085. 
^ 16 4T 1-29 

ELECTRIC HOSPITAL BED- 

Complete with mattress, 3 level 
buttons, head, foot St heighth of 
bed. Excellent condition. Grig. 
$1200. One year old $600. Com- 
mode Chair -excellent condition 
$35.00. Call 427-1901 Wed. thru 
Sun. 
16-TFN 

BED FRAME - Queen size, 

worlds strongest, $50. Call 545- 

4767. 

16 IT 2-9 



LADIES JEWELRY FOR SALE 

One ladies cocktail ring with 45 
diamonds and is 14 carat yellow 
gdd. Also a 14 carat white golfa 
23 jewel ladies Bulova watch. 
Ring appraised at $3400 and 
watch appraised at $1900. WiU 
seU either for half the appraised 
value. CaU 347-0638 after 5:00 
p.m. 22 TFN 



24.WaiitodToBiiy 



17.FwiiitHrt 



MAKINu ROOM FOR 



BABY 



TABLE SAW - Prefer carbide 
bUule. WiU pay cash. CaU 627- 
50208 -5 p.m. Ask for Lisa. 



(.ASH PAID - Virginia Beach 
Antique Co. pays cash for an- 
tiques, old furniture, clocks, 
glassware, lamps, china, oil pain- 
tings, oriental rugs, old iron and 
antique toys. We buy one piece 
or entire housefulls. Also, good 
used furnilure. Call 422-4477 
between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. 
24 TFN 

4l)NK CARS Wrecked or run- 
ning, casft-free towing. We also 
buy xaeS radiators and batteries. 



GENERAL HOUSEcleaning 
rdiabic and experienced. Ca' 
340-1389. 

II TFN 
NURSES AIDE • Experienced, 
would Uke private duty hospital 
care, certified^ references. Have 
own transportation. CaU 399- 
4819. 

I14T3-2 

WILL DO IRONING • In my 
Deep Creek (Travel«s Trailer 
Court) home. By the piece or flat 
rate. Call 485-2242. 

1I4T3-2 



Saj? : 4. piece ^KW8 '^^ ^iiite^..,, 
coffee table and 2 end tables, 9 x 
12 avacado rug with pad... 
Etagere, dresser, painting. Al] ' 
good condition, 
reasonable offer. Call 420-1 197. 
17 4T 2-16 



7 d^ a vreck/.Call 487-9222 or 
aftef^pA 340-1059...,. 



. AU in" 
N^2ke 



STOP LIVING IN FEAR- 

Complete Dog Training 3 mon- 
.ths to 3 years. Licensed from 
largest K-9 Corp. in the nation., 
CaU 481-6999. 
I3TFN 

GEUMAN SHEPARD Pup- 
pies - AKC r^stered, for pet 
« show. $130 and ^ip. 
COUNTRY SQUIRE 

SHEPARDS. Call 488-8065. 
1^TFN 



NANDAY CONOUR - Part 
hand tamed, young bird. Can be 
taught to talk, cage included. 
Moving must scU. $75. Call after 
6,497-6280. 

I3TFN 



SIAMISE UTTENS - Red 

Point, registered; champion 
sired, show quality, $200. 481- 
3338 

13 TFN 



GOLDEN RETREIVER - For 

Stud, AKC registered, dark 
golden, 2H year old, champion 
bloodline. Choice of fee or pick 
of UtW. Call alter 5, 804-653- 
2051. 

I3TFN 

OLD ENGLISH SHEfPDOG ■ 

Puppies, AKC registered, 
w^ned in March, deposit wiU 
h(rfd.CaH4S7-6»9. 

13*3-2 



SOFA AND CHAIRS - brown 
and tan plaid, 3 cushion, sofa, 2 
olive green velveteen barrel back 
chairs, $7S each. Black vinyl bar, 
$30. 2 bean bag chairs, while ami 
yeUow $5. Call 420-7719. 
17 TFN 

KOEHLER CONTEMPORARY 

Sofa - Button tuffed, antique 
gold crushed valour fabirc, super 
confonable. and in good con- 
dition. $115 or best offer. Call 
424-3527. 
17 2T2-9 

BEDROOM SET - 4 pieces, like 
new. $400 or best offer. Call 583- 
2451. 
17 IT 2-9 

3 PIECE SOLID TEAKWOOD 

Stereo Cabinet - 85" long, lots of 
storage space for tapes and 
records. Has Sony reel-to-rwl 
tape deck and Sony receiver 
SR6050, 30 watu per channel. 2 
Sansui speakers, SP2000. Space 
in cabinet for turntable. All for 
$800. Call 588-581 1. 

17 TFN 



24TFN 

CASH • Buying furniture, an- 
tiques, jewyjry, silver, gold and 
coins. Top dollar Durwood Zedd 
and Co. 625-5()00. 

244T2/9 



TV's AND GUNS - Immediate 
cash. Black and white or color. 
Portsmouth Gun and TV shop. 

Call 393-1500. 

244T2-9 



25.Q««4TliiiigsT«Eat 



EARL SMITH OYSTERS . 

Across from Hurd Seafood 
Restaurant. Shucked in own 
natural juices. By quarts, pints, 
or bUsheU. Call .340-51-}. 

t 25 4T 2/9. 



29. EirtMlaiiiiRMt 



FOR SALE-70 BaUroom dance 
'essons. Call Larry Dunn for 
mo^e information 480-2154. 

26-TFN 



2t.Firawttoi 



lt.toti«MS 



HREWOOD FOR SALE - All 

hardwood. Large pick-up load 
deUvered. $55. qdl 421-7350. 

y-jryrFN 




14« Uwil B dl 



HAN AMEAD - Far the Ift3 
iNMrttav senon. ^ps waWric 
for powo ukI MiL Cottar Mke 
Medey, Wodaitf l*«at Resort 
Maftae Rewrt, M IOO-$S2-3743. 
• 2T2-I6 



AlVAMMHi^ GEHJMNC ■ s5 

yean <*l, ^; Jet Flash (AAAT) 
very ^ntk, food for youth. 
$1,500 B^otiable. Call Kar«i at 
$47-4649 or 54t-997 1. 
I44T-2/9 



ANTIQUE - Hahoaviy Dining 
room suit, table with leaf, 6 
chairs and sideboard. Ne^s 
refinishing. $350. Oak sicteboard 
$150. Gateleg table $185. 
Mahogany Corner cupboard, 
$250. Call 543-3085. Tum- 
bleweed Trading Co. ■ 
18 IT 1-29 

■K FLEA MARKET and An- 
tique ^ow - M the Hwopum 
Coliseun, Sunday February 
13th, llaooam 9 pm. IOC's of 
exhibitors from 7 stales, 
featuriiv antiquo. c(4lectit)les. 
2nd hand itons, crafts arid taudi 
more! Admission is $1 .50. (Hdf 
price after 5). For tikoft Mot- 
mationcaU 422-9500. 

__^ vtnzs 

ANTIQUE KITCHEN - 

Wood/coal stove, Goo^ coii- 
iStfOB. Cal ibvLat 547-4391 af- 
ter 6 cdl4«3-46S4. 
HTFN 

IVORY COlLeClf<»N • 

Statues, Netsike, Oriental 
ioeras, «lks, OemMne neck- 
laces; Vases anl Boxes. 1804 
Granby St., 625-9119. IHily 10- 



29.UwRA6ardM 



I 



35.HMWMF«rRMt 



WILSON HEIGHTS - $600 a 
month, 3 bedroom. Cape Cod, 
great room with Tireplace, 2'A 
bath, large country kitchen, 
garage, spacious. Call 543-4555. 
Ricardo Realtors. 
33 IT 2-9 

2 BEDROOM DUPLEX - I'/i 

blocks to Chesapeake Bay. Low 
Ve.xo, off street, parking, 
vacant, year lease. LETOUR- 
NEOU REALTY. 481-0612 
35-4T-2/9 



36. RmI Estate 



ADDITIONS - Rooms, garages, 
convert garages, decks, etc. 
Quality work by a licensed 
builder. Free estimates. Call 340- 
2511. ■ 
47 TFN 

ADDITIONS, ROOMS- car- 
pentry, roofing, siding, storm 
window, storm doors, plastering, 
electric, concrete work, pl»im- 
bing, guttering, remodeling, kit- 
chen and baths, brick arid block 
work, aluminum siding, 
fireplaces, carpeting painting, 
specializing ia parking areas and 
driveways, all type of 
demolition, free estimate without 
obUgation,' prompt- sefvi(«. Ser- 
ving all of Tidewater. Bonded 
and Insured, Slate Regiltired. 
CaU 625-7435, 623-6148, Or 499- 
$516. 

47-TFN 



THE LEIGH PHOTOGRA- 
PHIC SERVICE - Offers full 
coverage of your needs at your 
wedding. Please call for more in- 
formation and open dates. 482- 
1312. 
52-TFN 



93> iiMiwMm(fvNinnii( 



BATHROOM REMODELING - 

Old and new. Specializing in 
ceramic tile walls and floor 
covering. Reasonable rates. Free 
estimaes. 20 years experience in 
Tidewater area. Small and large 
io9V. Guarantee all work. Call 
547-4774 anytime. 

53 TFN 



Sft. SMriM A Alteratlan 



SEARS SEWING MACHINES • 

I with cabinet, $75. I without 
cabinet $25. Call 420-7719. 

56 ITN 



KEMPSViLLE Beautifully 
decorated like model, 2 story 
home, 3 bedroom, 2'A bath, 
fireplace, fenced yard, green 
house window. Many extras. By 
owner. Call 495-2666 anytime. 

36-4T2/9 



49.MeviiifailMiinf 



] 



39. Prof Mtisnai ScnricM 



ANDERSON REMODELING - 

All types of home repairs. Pain- 
ting, roofing, siding, carpentiy, 
etc. Work guaranteed. Free 
estimates. Insured and bonded. 
CaH $88-2558. 

49 TFN 



INCOME TAX - and Account- 
ing (including tax audits). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Agent, 
' 3^0^'Virginia Beach Blvd., (near 
RbsemoWt Rd:) Call 463-6608. 
39-TFN 

BOOKKEEPING ■ Monthly 
balance-sheet, P & L deuiled 
trial balance from your checks 
and receipts, stubs, or register 
tapes. 941*8 and VA-5's. Up to 
200 checkbook transactions 
monthly; $45. Payables, receiv- 
able, small payroll. Chesapeake 
only. Call 420-6623. 

39-TFN 

BOOKKEEPING SEktii.^ • 

Including quarterly payroll 
reports and bank account recop 
ciliation. Specializing in^smaU 
proprietorships. Pick up and 
delivery. Retired professional. 
Call 420-5624. 

39 TFN 



51. PiiRtiiif 



HOME 
IMPROVEMENT 

Room additiong for all 
porpoges. Convert 
garage, raise dormers. 

Any type of improv- 
ment. Bathroom and 
Kitchen remodeling. 

R. H. BLACK 

399-8359 397-7171 



WALLPAPERING AND 
PAINTING-Fasi and friendly 
service, local leferences fur- 
nished. Call us for a free 
estimate. Arthur and Company 
Redecorating Contractors., 420^ 
3478. ' 

51 TFN 




40.S«rHc«« 



Zl 



SALES 

Interested In 
Making Big 

''BkJCKS'l 

CaU Immediately 

463-3540 



GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Home sites for sale 

for 

PA>ple Planning 

Homes <S Custom 

Builders 

SALFJii OFFICE 
333 Providence Rd. 



CALL 464-9317 



LANDSCAPIN6 BERVICE ■ 

Lawn and Garden restoration, 
grading and seeding. Free 
estimates. 421-7350. 

JOYNER PROFESSIONAL 
LANDSCAPING and lawn ser- 
vice. Free estimates. 543-4949. 

^ If * * , 

Mu£c»*UTlER Kf^ S6l, 

Shredded wood and bark hard- 
wood, truckload, any size. 
Protect your shn#s. Jjet now 
wkile on sale.?Wje deliver in one 
day. 853-0250 or 855-7467. 

29 "H^ 



TYPING SERVICE - For 

businesses and individuals'. 7 

days a week, IBM Selectric. 

Reasonable rates. Call either 

467-7112. KempsvUte area, or 

463-0236, Hilltop/Pembroke 

area. 

40 TFN 

ALL T^ES M.TOfmA11|KS 

and start^^s repaired. Battlefitid 
AutoEl^^,<;8^S47-12J0. 

40-TFN 

BOOKKEEPER - Will do books 
in my home. Experienced in 
payroll and quarterly returns. 
Pick-up and delivery service. 
Call 543-4096 after 5 p.m. for 
more information and rates. 

40WTFN 




$795.00 

rCiU.1. TOtMY) 

STATE LINE BUILDER^ 

rfT-fFBf T iT, f,'^((i,i'j;,tf(inili 1 1 tn ) Ti I 

Hltliwayl69 

mfmlk,Jfi£.Zim JIM LEWIS 

(919) 435-6118 Home: (804) 421-2506 



WALLPAPOUNG - Experkn- 
ced, referen<», aU work guaran- 
teed, $7 a roU, CaU 5871904 ask 
for Ddjra. 
40 4T 2-23 

TIDEWATUI AREA RENTAL 

Urgently neeited - Let us handle 
your propoty for pnsonal atten- 
titm. CaU EUen at 481-3177 or 
481-0612. LetoumeousHaJty. 
402T2-9 



When Something Needs 
Building or Repaired, You Need 

BLACK 

BROS. 

Home Improvemeni 

.S|KciaUsls 
'Hiiildingt niili:Kini»R»K)ls»C at|M>ils»l.aiMgcs 
• Ikiih RcimHJdcd'Kooin AtJdilions 
•Aluminum SiJmgs'Kilchcn RcnuKJclinx 

545-7318 

littith i:. mack. .sr. 




4 i ' 1 1, , ' ■ ■ ' ■ ' ' 
REC()f<mfnONED IBM and 
Smith Corona electric 
typewriters, riso rttsmditioned 
Royal ITOO of»e a^. (WET) 



41.Cw?«Hi7 



CaU 497-8771. 5 : 



3MT-?/9 



$. 



18 TFN 



COMPUTER - ZEROX 820 with 
DiaUo 630 printer, S'A inch 
irkz, software inchidcd. $5,000. 
CaU 468-5792. 
: 3MT-2/9 



CARPENTRY. PAINTING, 

ROn ING '>v*"<' ^1 '^P^ °^ 
maintenaim. Storm windows, 
gutters and screens repaired. 
Free estimates. Sanders Con- 

struciion. 420-84JJ. 

41 TFN 



Chesapeake: 
804-421-9273 



Dean P. Edwards, Inc. 

Additions, Repairs, Concrete Work 

and New Home Construction 

Guaranteed Satisfaction & 

Quality Workmanship 

Outer Banks 
919-261-2901 



wssmm 






20 Virginia Beach Sun, February 9, 1983 




Dodge Custom Vans - 



Luxury On Wheels 



width, sofa-bed, chrome 
finish aircraft-style 
lighting, courtesy lights 
for cab area, floor and 
side step areas. 

Rear area cargo cour- 
tesy lights, lighted vanity 
mirror on passenger visor, 
recessed ashtray/drink 
holders with accent light 
to illuminate STP logo, 
STP design service and 
snack tables, full sound 
and thermal insulation 




areas, AM/FM cassette 
stereo radio with spmkers 
and antenna and STF 
design name plates on 
sdits. 

Exterior Om^ 
And Acccsaories 
Special design raised 
sport roof with two for- 
ward area view windows, 
running boards with front 
and rear splash guards fi^U 
chassis rust-proofing 
treatment and exteripr 
paint design: STP theme* 

Additionally Virginia 
Beach Dod^ can build the 
van of your dreams 



In America, where the 
enjoyment of life is 
passionately pursued. 
Dodge Vans are routinely 
recommended as the 
number one choice 
driving pleasure. 

Uniquely combining the 
best in design ideas, 
technology, and craf- 
tsmanship. Dodge gives 
you the space, elegance 
and comfort in the 
tradition of the American 
dream. Even though 
today's automobiles con- 
tinue to get smaller and 
smaller, the need for- 
family transportation still 
prevails, and Dodge Vans 
are designed for today's 
transportation needs. 

Capture again the joy of 

traveling. Take charge! 

Discover for yourself how 

)odge can help you recap- 



ture your American 
dream. 

There is a Dodge Van to 
fit your budget, with the 
options to fit your needs, 
built with quality and 
precision for durability 
and beauty. All the con- 
veniences of home with 
features such as: 
Interior Appointments: 

Corporate colors coor- 
dination, executive-style 
swivel, reclining seats, full 



treatment front and side 
door pull straps, protec- 
tive metal tread plates at 
front and side doors. 

Rear deck-style 
cabinetry with wardrobe 
area, sink with water sup- 
ply and ice chest with STP 
logo, cabinetry lighting, 
cab floor area carpet 
protector mat, interior 
curtains with STP design 
ties, privacy glass, window 
treatment, interior storage 



What It Takes To 
Be The Largest 
Dodge Van and 
Car Dealer In 
Virginia 



Virginia Beach Dodge is 
widely recognized as one 
of Tidewater's leading 
volume automobile 
dealerships. They have 
grown by !ea|» and boun- 
ds since their inception 
over a y^u- and a half ago. 
In fact, Virginia Beach 
Dodge has become the 
biggnt Dodge van and car 
dealCTship in the state of 
Virginia. 

The success of Virginia 
Beach Dodge is not by ao- 
cidmt. The Virginia Beach 
Dodge success formula is 
a carefully planned recipe 
guaranteed to satisfy 
almost any automotive 
customer in Tidewater. 
General manager Chuck 
Collins says it best. 

"The suc<;ess of 
Virginia Beach Dod|f is 



I 



Perry Buick Presents The Front Wheel 

Drive Performers 



PERRY BUICK 

MS3 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 
IN NORFOLK AT NEWTOWN BOiui 



SERVING TIDEWATER OVER 52 YEARS 

461-8855 




Skyhawk 

46-28 

Hwy. Mpg. 



Skylark 

42-27 

Hwy. Mpg 



Century 

39-24 

Hwy. Mpg. 




Buick's Designs For Driving 



the direct results of efforts 
to appeal to a wide variety 
of customers with quality 
products and a versatile 
selection at reasonable 
prices that fit easily into 
the typical - family 
budget." ^ 

If you are in the market 
for a luxuries customiixd 
van - you'll want to go to 
Virginia Beach Dodge. 

Virginia Beach Dodge 
offers "one of the largest 
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Virginia Beach Dodge is 
offering tremendous price 
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see what it takes to be the 
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the most professional sales 
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Beach Dodge - Eastern 
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phrases go hand in hand 
with customer satisfac- 
tion, day in and day out. 



1 4 Reasons Why Virginia Beach 
Dodge Is The largest 

Introducing... Virginia Beach Dodge's Sales Professionals 




Mkhael Bnrwlt 



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WayMUmI JohnCaprio LouWilUans Un? Jacobs 

VIRGINIA BEACH DODGE SALUTES THESE MEN 




11.9% 

Financing 



On All New 

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USED CARS THAT 


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1976CHEV.C-10PICKtP 
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1979CAMARO 
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stk.iciaoTc *886 


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1979CAMAROZ-28 
Loaded 

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V-4»,Lowled,Two-IOBe 

Stk.*13«9A *7,786 


1981 CHEVETTE 2 Door 
4 Cylinder, 4 speed, 

Slk.#7559A *3,786 

1978 CAPRICE 2 Door 
V-8,Auto.,P.S.,A/C 
Till Wheel, AM/FM. Vinyl Roof 

Stk.#1053B *4,186 

1979 NOVA 

Aulc, P.S., P.B., A.C. Low 


1969 NOVA 4 Door 
Good TransporUUoa 

SIk. #7151 A '386 

1980 iMPALA Wagon 

9 Passenger, Aalo., P.S., P.B. 
A/C, AM/FM Stereo 

SIk. #1349 A '5,186 


Mileage 

SIk. * 1336A *4,48i5 

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4Cyl.4Spd.,A.C. 


IMI V W BUS VANAGON 
9 l^sieager, 4-Specd 

SIk. #1070 A *7,686 


Slk.#78«3A *3,986 

1976 CIO 
3ipd.. P.S.,P.B. 


1982 C-10FI,FFT SIDE 
iCyl.,4S|iecd 

SIk. #8025 A '5,986 


SIk. II 235 A '1,386 






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Is Mad Arsonist Burning Beach? 

It's Possible, V.B.F.D. Arson Chief Says 



Five arson fires since 
mid-Ndv,, four in one 
week, costs money and en- 
dangers lives. 



By Mike Gooding 
Sun Staff Writer 

'A curious string of five arson fires in the resort 
sectitm of Virginia Beach since mid-November, 
four of which occured within a week of each other, 
has confounded city fire investigator, leaving 
them in many ways baffled and frustrated. Said 
Capt. James E. Hundley, the fire department's 
chief arson investigator: "It's a real possibility" 
Virginia Beach has a mad arsonist on its hands. 

Then again, Hundley noted, "we can really 
draw no link between any of these fires except 
that they all happened at the oceanfrrait. Right 



now, we have no suspects. We've got some 
substantial evidence. Now we have to connect the 
who with the how." 

Commonwealth's Attorney Paul A. Sciortino, 
who se office is vested by the state with the 
responsibility of prosecuting arsonists, called the 
recent rash of fires along the resort strip "very 
unusual." But, Sciortino added, "1 don't know if 
there is a link between the fires. It could have 
been a paid arsonist, it could have been a 
pyromaniac, it could have been the owners." 

On Nov. 14, 18 pieces of firefighting equipment 
and 100 men battled an arson fire at the 60 
year-old Ivanhoe Hotel on Atlantic Avenue at 21st 
Street fcx- more than three hours. All that 
remained after the fire was a charred skeletal 
reminder of what once was. More than $500,000 
in property damages resulted. Two months later, 
another JM^on fire occured there of far lesser 
magnitude. 

On Feb. 3, fire swept through another Virjiinia 
Beach hospitality house, the Avalon Hotel, which 
is one block away fi-om the Ivanhoe oi Atlantic 



Avenue. Around 35 firefighters took three hours 
to briof the arson-started blaze under ccMitrol. 
Much oi the interior of the 48 year-dd structure 
was damaged, but its owner thinks the hotel can 
be restored. One Virginia Beach firefighter was 
taken to Virginia Beach General Hospital and 
treated for smcke inhalation. 

The next night. Sunday, Feb. 6, fire swept 
through Yorgy's Restaurant on Pacific Avenue at 
40th Street. Fire investigators determined arson 
was also the cause of that fire, which did heavy 
damage to the front half of the resuurant. The 
rear half of the establishment suffered fire and 
smoke damage. No one was injured as a resuh of 
the fire, which was extinguished quickly. 

Hie following night, Monday, Feb. 7, a cottage 
in the 200 block of 18th Street between Atlantic 
and I^cific avenues was the target of yet another 
arson. Nc^xxiy was injured in the fire, which was 
also put out quickly. Damage figures were not 
available. 

Last year in Virginia Beach, arsm accounted for 

SeeARSON, PagelS 



This anon nr» was set by Viininia Beach Hrcnghten as a 
trainiag aid in combalinit and detecting anon fires. 



^^Chool Board JSMtWrsr^ip^ointment Bill 



'We'll Continue To Get Heat" - Mrs. McClanan 



ByGregGoldfarb 

Sun Editor 

As the waters surrounding the Virginia Beach school 
''' board selection process continue to swirl, several 
questions have bubbled to the surface, such as: 

•Should the Virginia General Assembly allow 
localities the option of publically electing school mem- 
bers with the powers of taxation? 

•Should a City Council special committee be formed 
to interview all applicants in the city's talent bank from 
which people to a$rve o|, U»e, Wly's bward an4 eom- 
Biisaons arc drawii? 

•Is the city's current method of selecting schod beard 
members appr(n)riate? 

•Is the school board, which in 1982 controlled 
$113,861,812 of the city's total $264,355,295, accoun- 
table enough to the public? 

Although legislators have made no formal response to 
the request, for the last two years City Council has in- 
cluded in its General Assembly legislative wishlist an 
appeal for a state study m allawii^g localities the option 
of popularly electing school board members. They 
would also be granted the powers of taxation. This 
- would allow Virginia Beach citizens to directly elect 
school board members. Currently, council appoints 
them. 

While not directly addressing the local option 
question. Vir^aia Beach Democratic Delegates Julie L. 
Smltli and denn B. McCladan, husband of Princess 
Aww BoroBgii ConocilwomaB Reba S. McClaaaB, 
recoitly attempted to introduce a bill which would have 
allowed more citizen imput into the school board ap- 
pointment process without stripping council of its 
power. The two delegates, McClanan a 12-year veteran 
and Smith a freshman, propcKcd a bill calling for man- 



B^ 



Henley Proposes Review Committee 



datory public hearings before school board appoint 
ments are made. In addition, the proposed biU con 
tained restrictions, like calling for the council, within 30 
days before it fills a school board vacancy, to make 
pulMc a list of candidates faiyiMt apppi^tment and ii^ 
credentials. Only those itames appearing on the puMc 
list would be eligible for appointment. The bill also 
originally applied to every city and county in the state, 
but the House Education Committee amended it to ap- 
ply only to Virginia Beach. 

The bill was requested by Mrs. McClanan, who has 
been displeased with the local school board selection 
process. Following council protest, however, her 
husband withdrew the bill. As of now the bill is dead 
because it has no chance of getting back on the agenda 
for this year's Assembly session. But Mrs. McClanan 
said She will seek a local ordinance, like that of her 
husband's, within the next few weeks. 

When the appointment issue was first brought before 
council on Monday, Feb. 7, it voted 9-1 for passage of a 
resolution calling on the General Assembly to kill the 
delegates' bill, thus symbolizing council's opposition to 
the public hearings, the manner in which it was brought 
before the council without prior warning, or both. 

Saying that the "people deserve to know more," 
however, Mrs. McClanan continues to be critical of the 
current selection process of school board members. She 
charges that council does not spend enough time 
discussing the applicants for the school board seats; ap- 



plicants whose names are drawn from a talent bank the 
city keeps for all city boards and commissions. 

"We did not spend more than IS or 20 minutes in 
executive session discussing it," McClanan said, 
g to the (Xmndl's sele(^(»i of the school boatd's 
three newest membN-s: A. Aadrew Ege, Susan Fiaiygan 
Md Rev. B. G. Canpbell. 

In the aftermath of the controversial redistricting of 
school boundry lines, and a public call to have a new 
elementary school named after a slain Virginia Beach 
police officCT, Mrs. McClanan said some Virginia Beach 
parents felt that "what they said meant nothing" when 
they took their concerns to the school board. 

"We'll continue to get heat unless we provide for 
more public imput," McClanan said over the public 
reaction and the media «>verage of the issues. 

McClanan's husband's proposal would not have 
taken the power of appointing school board members 
away from council, but it would have created another 
public platform upon which citizens could express their 
views, and ask the perspective school board members 
questions. 

"That's all there was to it," Mrs. McClanan said. 
"Just to hold a public hearing." 

McClanan said she is in favor of direct election of 
school board members, but "not necessarily" with the 
powers of taxation. 

Iflt's not broken, don't fix it 



The Virginia Beach Public School System, guided by 
Superintendent E. E. Brickell §nd its 1 1 -member school 
board, has a reputation of being progressive, and 
among the finest systems in the state if not the coumry. 

Most of the council members with whom The Virginia 
Beach Sun spoke had varying views on the school board 
appointment issue, and their comments follow. All 
council members, except At-large Councilwoman 
Meyera Oberndorf who was absent, and Mrs. Mc- 
Clanan, voted against supporting a bill calling for 
pubtt&Jiearings before school board appointments are 
made. 

faago Conndiwoman and Vice Mayor AiAara 
Henley said she voted against supporting the bill 
because "as the bill was written it would only apply to 
Virginia Beach. If it only applies to Virginia Beach the 
right thing to do is determine the question locally. Then, 
if it proved that it didn't work we could correct it 
locally. Plus, it was the first time I had seen it."- 

Henley is in favor of a popularly elected school board 
with the powers of taxation, nothing that it's an "ack- 
ward situation" now. 

"The proper thing is for the state to take an in-depth 
look at the local option," she said, also suggesting that 
in the interim a special council committee be formed to 
review all applications for public boards and com- 
missions that are in the city's talent bank, f 

"The council needs a committee to interview every 
person who submits a resume to serve on the school 
board or any other board or commission," she said. 
The board would be comprised of two members of 
council. Council members would take turns serving on 
the committee, and it would be active all the time. 

"Now fhey have to do that individually," she said 

See COUNCIL. Page? 




Cape Henry Women At Luackeon 



Arts And Crftfts 



Cape Henry Women Win 



The GFWC Cape Henry 
Woman's Club of Virginia 
Beach recently met at 
Tandom's Pine Tree Inn 
on Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and host^ a 
program on arts and craf- 
ts. More than 50 dub 
members were in atten- 
dance for the luncheon 
OMCting. 

Arts and crafts items, 
submitted and displays! 
by club members, were 
judged by Jean Frye and 
Jo Ann Kendrick of 
Leggett's department 
store, Lynnhaven Mall. 
Award winners were as 
follows: 



Blue ribbon for first 
place overall was awardnl 
to Barbara Wiley, who 
received a $25 gift cer- 
tificate from Legget's. 

In • the ceramics 
category, Mrs. John Grif- 
fin won a bJoe ribbon. 

In the Christmas 
cat^ory, Mrs. Ian R^crl 
NM^es won a Mm rU>- 
bM« and Mn. H. Tribble 
won a red ribbon, which 
signifies second place. 

In the counted cross- 
stitch category, Mis. Jeka 
<Mfria and Mis. Elbert B. 
Cox shared Mue rl iiboiia , 
and Mrs. Riciiard A. 
Itanghtery won a yellow 



ribbon signifying third 
place. 

In the crafty creatures 
category. Mrs. Gcm|^ H. 
Mnteky, Jr. won a Mne 
ribbmi. 

In the crewel cat^ory, 
Mn. W. r. jMMt, Jr. 
won a Mm riMMM, and 
Mrs. CmH H. Rwd won a 
redrftbon. 

In the embroidering 
cat^ory, Mrs. Fred J. 
Ymu^ ai»i Mn. Artkw 
B. taacs wMi Mat itt- 



SecCAPE,h|e7 



Sponsored By Nick Nicholson 

Annual Virginia Beach Rescue 
Squad Benefit Oyster Roast 
Set For This Sunday: Dome 

The Seventh Annual Oyster Roast Benefit for 
the Virginia Beach Rescue Squad will be held on 
Sunday, Ffeb. 20 from I to 4 p.m. at the Virginia 
Beach Dome. 

Admission is a $20 per person donation to the 
Virginia Beach Rescue Squad. 

The menu will include raw oysters, stewed 
oysters, clam chowder, barixcue, baked beans, 
cde slaw, all the beer you can drink. Dixlelaod 
music will also be provided. 

The roast is sponsored each year by Mck 
^6chobon, and his friends who foot the bill for the 
entire event. Nicholson e^Mnes why. 

"Eight years ago the re^ue squad carried me 
to the hospital," he said, "anl I kiKW nothing 
tl^n (rf the rescue squad's operation. Later on I 
didn't get a biU or anytlni|. Peofde tdd me that 
tte rescue squad provi<ks the service for free. 
They were so good to me that I thought I'd like to 
help them." 

}^:^}lsoo said the roast usually draws from 800 
to 1 ,000 people, and has been dubbed the Virginia 
Beach "Social Event of the Year." 

The roast generates about $9,000, which is 
given in full to the rescue squ«i. Hie cost of 
pitting on the roast is aroimd $7,000, aU of which 
is i»id for by Mchdson aiul his friends. Hm «xt 
covers only the food. Ibe labor is aD volunteer. 

!«diolson said prepar^ions for the roast will 
mdude 70 bushels (rf oystere, 75 gallcns ct 
oysters, 90 gallons of clam cbowtkr. nd 400 
pounds (rf barbecue . 

Mdiobon. retired, is tlw farmet owner ot 
Nick's Hospiulity House, 5W Laskin Road. 

CBU4a-7911 or 428-7891 to more information. 



Training Center Named After Maloney 

The Virginia Beach Pdice Department Training 
Center on Ue Roy Dixon Drive will be named the 
Daniel T. Maloney Training Center. 

aty Council Moiday afternoon approved the name 
and at the same time considered a proposal by 
Councilwoman Meyera OberndOTf to establish an 
Awards and Memorials Board to receive, screen and 
forward recommendations to Council in connection with 
naming public facilities in honor of people whose lives 
have had a significant impact cm the quality of life in the 
city. 

Some citizens, supported by Oberndorf, had asked 
that the School Board name a schod in hoior ot 
Maloney who was killed recently in the line of duty. The 
Board refused. 

Oberndo-fs proposal would pertain cmly to city 
agencies and not to schools which are ojntrdlcd by the 
School Board. 

Mayor Louis R. Jones said that he would ask the 
Research and Advisory Committee, suggested by 
Oberndorf, if it would be interested in taking over the 
role of the committee. 

Qxincilman Jdin A. Baum said that awards and 
memorials are better if they arc spaitaneous. He said 
that the tendency is away from putting names of 
individuals ai public buildings. As time passes, he 
said, the names are not known to the public and are not 
descri(»ive. As for asking another ngeacy, such as the 
Scbod Board, to do the boiors, he said people should 
Umit themselves to what they can acxomplish 
themselves. 

In reference to the School Board action, he said that 
the job was macte more difTicult because what started 
out as a good idea lock an unfortunate twist. 

Oberndorf said that she was not talking about any 
agency but the Qty Council. She said that it is less 
difficult to have an unbiased board to make recommen- 
dations. 

Chief Charles Wall reconmcnded the name far the 
Center on behalf (rf members of the Police Department. 
In supporting tM recommendation, Qty Manager 
Thomas H. Muehlenbeck said that Maloiey was the 
first officer in the city's history to be killed in other than 
an Kci(kntal situation. 




Savvies . 

Savvides 
Honored 

The National Soc- 
iety Daughters of the 
American Revolution 
recently presented its 
Americanism Medal 
to Michael C. Sav- 
vides at ceremonies 
held at Galilee 
Episcopal Church. 

Mrs. Milton Thor- 
pe, Regent of the 
Adam Thoroughgood 
Chapter, made the 
presentation. 






IHB 



wm 



m 



OTI 



■■« 



2 Virfiiiia Beach &iii.Fcbniafy 16, 1M3 



Sun Commentary 



\ 



■'?»-t:i 



Editorials 



No Surprises 



One thing's for cerUdn. Virginia Beach 
City Council monbers don't like sur- 
prises. 

It wasn't too long ago that council, 
even though it had discussed the matto*, 
was surprised by State Senator Joe 
Canada publically seeking the direct elec- 
tion of the city's mayor. He called a press 
conference on the front stq)s of City Hall 
to announce that a committee had been 
formed to perpetuate the idea. Even 
though some members of council didn't 
object to the idea, almost all of them ob- 
jected to the manner in which it had been 
brought forth. Not much as been heard 
about the issue since then. 

More recmtly, council was confronted 
with a state bill calling for mandatory 
public hearings before school board ap- 
pointments are made. Again, it's not so 
much that council, in general, objects to 
the idea but they don't like it dropped on 
them for approval without Hrst being 
consulted over the matter by the bill's 
proponents. 

Ilie idea of receiving more imput from 
the public on the school board selection 
has its merit. However, as School Board 
Chairman Roy Woods notes, if public 



hearings are going to be held for school 
board appointmentsi they should be held 
for all appointments. 

Woods also has no objections, the last 
time we talked with him, to the direct el«:- 
tion of school board members, with 
powers of taxation; a move which doesn't 
seem to float too far out at sea. Although 
the school system is exemplary under the 
guidance of Dr. E. E. Brickell, superin- 
tendant of Virginia Beach public schools, 
why wouldn't the system be equally as 
good, under his mentorship, with 
popularly elected school board members? 
All partis involve would be pulling 
together toward the same end, would they 
not? 

Qawicil, nor the school board, deserve 
suqRriws when it comes to local gover- 
nmental, or educational affairs. As some 
council members have suggested, maybe 
council should quit the practice of submit- 
ting legislative wishiists to the General 
Assembly containing requests, which for 
the most part receive Httle action, and in- 
stead receive a list of items the General 
Assembly wants to see implemented. 
— G.D.G. 



Plagued By Arson 



Every once in a while, one is reminded 
of the serious flaws in the United States 
Constitution. 

For the most part, America's criminal 
justice system is the best in the world, bar 
none. The syston of checks and balance 
set up by the frtoiers of the Constitution 
which protect the rights of the accused are 
equitable and just. 

Sometimes, though, it would seem the 
law tilts a little too far in favor of the ac- 
cused. One such ouunple is the portion of 
American law dealing with the treatment 
of accused arsonists. 

In short, arson is nearly impossible to 
prove. Ask Capt. Janus Hundley of the 
Virginia Beach Fire Department. In his IS 
years with the departn^t, the arson in- 
vestigator knows of just two Virginia 
Beach residents who have ever served time 
in prison became of arson convictions. 
Then there is CommonwMlth's Attorn^ 
Paul Sciortino, who is widdy known for 



the hard line he draws against per- 
petrators of violent crimes. In the 13 years 
•'The Street Sweeper" has worked as a 
Virginia Beach prosecutor, he has never 
succeeded in sending anyone up the river 
for arson. 

Yet, Virginia Beach continues to be 
plagued by arson. In 1983 so far, there 
have been six arson cases, nearly all of 
them confined to the resort section of 
town. In 1982, Virginia Beach fireHghters 
battled 63 fires which were later deter- 
mined to have been the work of arsonists. 

Arson is a horrendous slap in the com- 
munity's face. Property is destroyed. 
Human lives are endangered. Millions 
upon millions of dollars are wasted. 

The judicial system must join forces 
with fireHghters in battling arson. With 
no seeming punishment facing them, ar- 
sonists will continue to go about their dir- 
ty business.— M.M.G. 



Handy Belt 



One ne^in't be a police, or a law enfor- 
cement officer to know that deputies are 
supposed to remove from prisoners, 
before placing them behind bars, such 
things which might be injurious to the in- 
mates' health. 

But even when shoestrings and belts are 
taken away, if the subject wants to com- 
mit suicide while in jail it can be done. 

If suicide is the intention, a prisoner 
can tear his clothes, bed sheets, or his 
blanket to make an implement with which 
to hang himself. Or, if the subject is really 
obsessed and is willing to go to any 
measure to kill himself, he can bi^h his 
head against the wall, drown himself in 
the basin, or bust a vein. Granted these 
examples are extreme, but also possible. 



The TKent death in the Virginia Beach 
jail by a man who hanged himself with his 
belt after being arrested for drunk driving 
was a tragedy for his family and certainly 
temporarily taints the image of the 
Virginia Beach Sh^iffs Department. But 
out of fairness to the department, 
however, it must be ronembered that in- 
cidents can happen. 

Who knows why the victim committed 
suicide, or to what measures he would 
have resorted t5 do it. The fact is he's 
dead. 

Taking one's own life can't be an easy 
thing to do; even drunk. But for someone 
with suicidal tendencies, having a belt 
handy doesn't help to deter the 
act.—G.D.G. 



Economic Investments 



In last week's issue an "If I Was 
Mayor" interviewee suggest that the 
city should be leary of fordgn investors. 
The contention was Uuu ford^ in^st- 
ments may influence political q^on,. 

This argument has b^n made before, 
and may or may not have merit. 

The other side of the coin, however, is 
that any investment in Virginia B^ch 
which leads to Konomic development is a 



good investment. There are numerous 
foreign investors in Virginia Beach, cer- 
tainly not just from Saudi Arabia, and 
their contributions to the city have 
resulted in jobs for our residents, more 
business for our business community and 
more tax money for our city treasury. Be 
leary, 'tis ture, but also be vvise and trust- 
ful unless given a reason to be otherwise. 
;.D.G. 



Letters To The Editor 



Reader Critical Of School Board Member; Urges Elections 



Editor: 

Whik attending the Jan. 18 meeting of the Mrginia 
Beach Sdiool Board. I picked up a copy of "Hie School 
Board of Virginia Beach, Its Respontibilitin-lts 
Duties-Its Member*-" 

Of particular interest to om in thn pubUcatkn it the 
last sentence coaoemn^ Rev. B.O. Ouiq>bea (Kenqx- 
viSk Borough) and is the basis for this letter. The 
sentence reads: "ifo wife, Dianne, is a teadier whh 
Virginia Beadi Public Schools." 

I inmwdiately wrote our Commonwealth Attorney, 
Paul Sciortind, and asked the following question: "How 
can a penon serve on the Sdiooi Board and vote on 
issues directly effectiiit salary, fringe benefitt, woridng 
conditions and the myriad of issues that wouM serve to 
enhance their personal gain?" 

Mr. Sciortin<H in a letter to me dated Jan. 21, 1983, 
responded as follovra: "...if the spouse was eiiq>loyed 
as a school teadier prior to her husband's anwintment 
to the School Board, both individuals could continue in 
employment or service with the sdiool system" 
(Opinions of the Attorney General, July 1970-June 
1971, p. 421). Ihe last paragnfdi <rf Mr. Sdortino's 
response to me dire^y addresses my coocera «ad 
question: "I would point out, however, that thn would 
not relieve Rev. Cami^U from the requirements oi 



S2.1-3S2 of the Code of Vi^inia, whidi would compel 
him to disdose his material Wp««pgt«l interest in any 
tnasactioa idiidi comet before the School Board and 
|valin>tt him from tfisciasing or voting on any matter 
witikk migte affect such mitterial financial interest." I 
rest my easel 

SdMol Baud ^jpointmenu in Viiginia Beadi, as well 
as tppdBanenti to other Boards and Commissions, are 
based on 'it ain't what you know, but who you know'! 
Tbey have become an affront to an informed, caring 
dtiienryl 

Ibis morning, Feb. 14, members of the Virginia 
Beadi O^ Coundl and the Virginia Beach School 
Board, met for bredcfiut at random's on Virginia 
Beach Boulevard. No public notice of Uiis meeting was 
ever made - this is a flagrant violation of The Freedom 
of bformatian Act. 

If ever the public should stand up and be counted, 
the time is now! An etected School Board in Virginia 
Beadi is a must. Attempu in Ridimond to rectify an 
intolerable situation in our Oty have failed. We, the 
peo^. now have the diance to make a change - we 
must get (bit issue on the ballot in November and vote 
for accountable public service. 

Vivian C. Hitchcock. 
Vu-ginia Beach 



Don't Offer Money To Brazil, Mexico 



Editor: 

1 do not think that is approimate for the Preadoit of 
the United States to go to Mexico ami to Bnzil to offer 
millions or billions of US tax-dollars to bail those coun- 
tries out of loans made to them by private New Ywk 
banks. The responsibility for any (kfaulted loans sh<Mild 
rest upon the directors and stockholden of tht banks 
involved. 

Not too many years ago. the ownership of a share of 
bank stock entailed a pmonal liability. If the bank 
failed, the shareowner lost the value of his shares of 



stock and. in addition, was personally liable for an 
amount equal to the par value of the stock. Depositors 
woe thus assured that the shareholders would provide 
the Nnk with careful conservative management. 

Today, the banks seem to be neatly transferring the 
losses to the taxpayers, under the smokescreen of a 
crisis. This has already taken place with the Chrysler 
Corporation situation. 

H. W. Dusinberre. 
Norfolk. Va. 



Go For New Library 

Editor: 

Preposterous! That's what I call this notion of re- 
vamping Wooico and making it into a library. 

For years, many dtizens of Virginia Beach have 
dreamed of having a central library. With those dreuns 
have also been visions of a beautiful, spacious, modem 
facility. 

That dmed-down department store hardly flts this 
bill. And from what 1 understand, a new Ubrary would 
cost the city just SI million more than the leasing of the 
Wooico. 



Ubrariea are a source of ptide for the community. 
Through the years, poUticaans may come and go. 
Libraries, will, however ronain as monuments to the 
dty's greatness. I think <nir leaders would be doing a 
great disservice by **" t building a new facility and opting 
instead to reinnox tat the Wodco. 

Mrs. Nancy Johnson 
Virginia Beach 



Go First Class 

Editor: 

I find going to the library a very pleasurable ncperwn- 
ce. They are buildings chocked full of intdlectualism, 
and serve as a retreat where you can go to get away from 
the kids at the house, or the traffic in the street. 

I would not enjoy going to the old Wooico store for 



Congratulations Sun 

Editor: 

Congratulations are in order for 77le yirtinki 
Bem^ Stm. Through the years, Tve wittdied your 
iKwspq)er undergo many changes. In recent 
weeks, however, I've detected sevcnd subtle 
additions to your puUicalion whkdi I fi^l have 
really sttengtheited it. 

I pvtkttlarly like the "Borough Pferade." It 



enrichmrat and escape as much as I would a shining new 
library. From w^t I've read, it would cost no more, 

build a new fadlity than to rent one. 

go second rate when you can go first 



ivobably less, to 
So who wants to 



dass? BuUd the nl^ library 



Mr$. Sally Turner. 
Virginia Beach 



teems to oaptan a true community spirit by 
highlighting the average peofrie. Also, I like your 
"Voice of the People" and "Prednct-by-PK- 
dnct" poUoe report. 
Keep vp the good work. 

Mn. Mabelle Moore 
\^rginiaBe«:h 



What's On Your Mind? Let Us Know! 

77w Virginki Beadi Sun wekKmm and encmiraget letten to tlw edited on ai^ and all Virginia Beach 
issues, as well as any <Aha istiMS, qiMstions m coaoam affecting the wdl bang of the Virginia Beach 
commuuty. Letters shmkl be typed, doubte qMced and bich^ the writen name, adifress and telq>hone 
number. Mail letters to The VirgMa Beach &m, 138 S. Rotonmit Road, Viqinia Beadi, Va. 234S2. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 



13« Soath RosenoBt Road, Vbilaia Beach, Va. 234S2 Plioac (tM) 4S6-3430 
USPS-66(m40; PakUilicd Wf^wsdayi 



C^GoMfai* 

Within rUewataArea 

OiieYear-$9 

AUOtherAreas 

OneYear-SU 

TwoYeari-Sl7 

Sec(^ Claa Pmta^ b pakl at LynnlMven &ttk», 

V^i^ BcMfa, Vi^aia 



* P n r 



ji lam^immmm 



Vir3inia Beach Happeninss This Week 



Virginia Beach Sun, February 16. 1983 3 

Send your liappcBin|s to The Virginia 
BcMh Sun, 13S $. Roscmont Road, 
N Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 




A series of free lectures on developing human 
potential and personal success, Alpha Success 
Training, have been scheduled for the fdlowing 
Virginia Beach locations: 

Wednesday, Feb. 16 at the Kempsville Recrea- 
tion Center. 

Thursday, Feb. 17 at the Pembrc*e-West 
Building, Independence Boulevard. 

Call 486-3994 for more information. 

Moff«#dback At ^Mibrok* 

Multimodal Therapy Institute lecture on 
Biofeedback, 7 to 9 p.m.. Suite 128, Pembroke 
Five Building. Errol Liebowitz will speak. Tickets 
are $4. For information call 490-1007. 



Flln 

Grace Brethren Church presents the film 
"Christian Fathering," 7:30 p.m., 805 First 
Colonial Road. Free and open to the public. 

JUanten PTA Po«iid«r's Day 

Alanton Elementary School PTA Founder's 
Day meeting, 7:30 p.m. Cafetorium. The kin- 
dergarten students will give a program on "Win- 
ter." 

Slnglo DarMtt At Pal«t« Rd. 

Single Parents of Virginia Beach Chapter 216 
Parents Without Partners orientation for prospec- 
tive members, 8 p.m., 5709 Paiute Road. For in- 
formation, call 486-3294. 

B^ach General Blood Scroom 

Virginia Beach General Hospital free blood 
pressure screenings, 6 to 7:30 p.m., 1060 First 
Colonial Road. 

Xi Alpha Lambda To Moot 

Xi Alpha Lambda chapter of Beta Sigma Phi 
sorority, 8. p.m., 655 Orangewood Drive. For in- 
formation, call 486-3 110. 

Savo Tho Whalot Boooflt 

Benefit for the Save the Whales Society 
featuring Derek Parrott, 7 p.m.. Heritage 
Bookstore, 319 L&skin Road. 

Thursday 



"The Pinhole Ima^ EleveffPhotographws," 
and exhibition of the lMAliirffc'"^hdllfltfapHi 6i 
eleven American photographers, opens at the 
Virginia Beach Arts Center Thursday, Feb. 18 and 
will be on view through March 18. 

The exhibit was curated by Willie Anne Wright 
for The Institute of Contemporary Art of the 
Virginia Museum. Samples of Wright's work are 
included in the show along with that of Clarissa 
Carnell, Barbara Esher, Jim Haberman, Mary 
Sayer Hammond, Martha Madigan, Mary Ruth 
Moore, Dale Quarterman, Eric Rennet, Wiley 
Sanderson and Ruth Thorne-Thomsen. 

The pinhole exhibit will be on view at the Arts 
Center Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 
p.m. and is free and open to the public. For ad- 
ditional information call 425-000. 

Brookwood lloMootary PTA 

Bcookwood Elementary School will host the 
Virginia Beach Council of PTA's "Founder's Day 
Program" on Thursday, Feb. 17 at 8 p.m. 

The past PTA Council Presidents and the 1982- 
83 Cultural Arts winners from the Virginia Beach 
schools will be recognized. Mr. Don Nultemeier, 
Council Cultural Arts Chairman, will present the 
winners in the music division on the Cultural Arts 
Reflections contest, who will perform. 

The Reflections Contest theme this year was 
"Life In These United States" and local winners 
will now advance to competition for district, state 
and national honors. 

Refreshments for the meeting will be provided 
by the Brookwood Elementary PTA. 

For more information call 481-5816. 

Battorod Whros PHai Sot 

The Preceptor Alpha Xi of Beta Sigma Phi will 
meet at the home of Donna Dana, 709 Earl of 
Chesterfield Lane on Thursday, Feb. 17 at 7 p.m. 

The cultural program will be presented by guest 
speaker, Linda Woods, who will show a film on 
battered wives. Applications for booths for the 
Cricket on the Hearth Craft Show, to be held in 
July, are still being taken. 

Anyone interested should contact the 

Rq^tration Chairman, Julie Coop^ge, 2040 

Malbon Road, Virginia Beach 23456. Donations 

from the craft show will purchase racing wheel- 

. chairs for the Virginia Beach Sunwheelers. 

Call 499-3567 or 486-1764 for more infor- 
mation. 

Word Procoosort To Moot 

The International Information/Word 
Processing Association will « meet on Thursday, 
Feb. 17 at Casa FarcUo's, MO Baker R<^, 
Virginia Beach. The social hour is from 6 to 7 
p.m. and will be followed by tte dirmer meeting 
from 7to 9 p.m. the price is $1 1 per person. 

This is a "Ofwrator's Night" so please en- 
courage the opcratoR yew know to attend. The 
featured speaker will be Dr. Ann S. Daughtry who 
will speak on "Emerging Carwrs in the Office 
Automation Industry." 

Reservations must be in by Tuesday, Feb. 15. 
Call Susan Gard (827-1^2 Peninsula) w Patty 
Sirt-man (464-1060 Norfolk/Virginia Beadi). 



vUlo 

Kempsville High School guidance department 
Systematic Training for Effective Parenting, 7:30 
p.m., home economics department. For infor- 
matics , call 495- 1 92 1 . 

VA-17ft WIvot To Coavooo 

VA-176 Enlisted Wives Club, 7 p.m. For infor- 
mation on location, call 486-3987, 428-5774 or 
486-3144. 

B o d al SorvIco At Banada 

Virginia Beach Council of Social Services, 
12:30 p.m., Ramada Inn, 7th St. and Ocean 
Front. 

Alcohol Aod Tho Paodly 

Hampton Roads Counselors Association, 12:30 
p.m.. Commodore Country Club. A program on 
"Alcohol and the Family" will be presented. 
Tickets are $4.75. For information, call 499-1285. 



I'O !' ' 



Friday 



Ai orNa Wlvo* Moot 

The U.S.S. America Enlisted Wives Club will 
hold a potluck dinner on Friday, Feb. 18, at 6 
p.m. topside the NOB hobby shop. Babysitting is 
available. For more information call 423-0998. 

Baylako Mothodiito To Moot 

Baylake United Methodist Church, 4300 Shore 
Drive, will hold a series of pre-Lent discussions 
and luncheons beginning Feb. 18 and continuing 
each Thursday through March 31 . 

Each session will begin at 12:30 p.m., with a 
soup-and-sandwich lunch. A discussion or 
meditation will follow, with the program ending 
about 1:15 p.m. 

The Rev. David Howell, senior minister at Bay- 
lake, will conduct the first session on Feb. 17. 
Other area ministers will conduct the succeeding 
sessions. 

Speakers for the series will be: 

Feb. 24-The Rev. Dan Dickenson, ad- 
ministrator of Westminister-Canterbury. 

March 3~The Rev. Richard J. Keever, Bayside 
Presbyterian Church. 

March 10~The Rev. James E. Dorson, Holy 
Family Catholic Church. • 

March 17-The Rev. Beverly D. Tucker Jr., Old 
Donation Episcopal Church. 

March 24-The Rev. Kenneth A. Carbaugh, Our 
Savior Lutheran Church. 

Mai-ch 3r-Commiinlon service conducted by 
Rev. Howell. 

There is no charge for attending the program. 
The series is open to the public. 

Each session will be held in the fellowship hall 
of Baylake United Methodist Church, at the mter- 
section of Shore Drive and Treasure Island Drive, 
one-half mile south of Northampton Boulevard. 

Ko ipt vlllo Synogofpuo To Blno 

Kempsville Conservative Synagogue auction 
and all-you-can-eat dinner, 7:30 p.m., Thalia 
Clubhouse. Tickets are $2.50. For reservations 
and information, call 424-9715 or 424-2956. 

t ai M fc ri dg o CMC U ag o o M oo H 

Sandbridge Beach Civic League, 10:30 a.m., 
Sandbridge Community Chapel. 

'SoporffiloMhow' It Offforod 

Virginia Beach Arts Center presents "Super- 
filmshow," 3 p.m., 1711 Arctic Ave. 

Astrological Assoc. To Moot 

Virginia Astrological Association all day 
workshop, 10 a.m., Speakers Hall at Giant Open 
Air Market, 2868 Virginia Beach Blvd. For infor- 
mation, call 486-3731 . 



ChristlaaW( 



Host Brooch 



Christian Women's Club of Virginia Beach 
Sweetheart Brunch, 10:45 a.m.. Holiday Inn, 1-44 
and Newtown Road. For reservations and infor- 
maUon, call 340-5571 or 340-8363. 

UBS Aaiorlca WIvos Bhio 

USS America Enlisted Wives Club potluck din- 
ner, 6 p.m., NOB Hobby Shop. Babysitters will be 
provided. For information, call 423-0998. 

Saturday 

Cosodc Workshop Is tot 

The Virginia Astrological Association will 
sponsor an all-day workshop beginning at 10 
a.m., Saturday, Feb. 19, in the Speakers Hall at 
Giant Open (at Lynnhaven Road), Virginia Bnch. 

The workshop, cntitl«l "Converse Transits", 
will be M by Jacob Schwart, nationally known 
astrologer. For information call 486-373 1 . 

Sunday 



'Carpontor's Tools' To Appotnr 

"The Carpenter's Tools" will be singing and 
playing at the Virginia Beach Canmunity Chapel 
on Sunday, Feb. 20 at 6 p.m. 

This group of nine collie students have just 
returned frcm an extended summer tour of China, 
where they lived and studied on several Chinese 
university campuses. They were the first Ameri- 
can Cultural Exchange Prc^ram under the 
US-China Educational Foundaticm and were so 
well received that the Oiinese government has 
asked them to return this year. 

Monday 

Now Bostavrant Asso. O fffflc o rs 



The Virginia Beach Chapter of the Virginia 
Restaurant Association will meet on Monday, 
Feb. 21, at 6:30 p.m. at Blue* Pete's Seafood, 
Restaurant located at 1300 North Muddy Creek 
Road. Fire Chief Harry E. Diezel will be the main 
speaker of the evening. In addition an IRS 
representative will speak on the new gross tip law. 

The newly elected officers will preside for the 
first time. They arc as follows: president, Pat 
Ricks; first vice president, Robert Herman; 
second vice president, Gus Riganot; secretary, 
Nabil Kassir; treasurer, William Miller III; public 
relations, Wesley Hull; and the board of directors 
are Robert Halstead and Roman Harris. 

All restaurant owners, managers and interested 
citizens are invited to attend this meeting. For in- 
formation on membership you may call Linda 
Gray at 499-5609. 



AtBovMoa 



Rita Co<rfidge will apprar with Virginia Pops 
0>ndu<Aor Walter Noona on Sunday, Feb. 20 at 
the Pavilion. 

Call 4^-8000 for more information. 



Hoad ln|vrios Blscossod 

The Virginia Beach General Hospital will host 
jieurosurgcon James Daniel Dillon, M.D. on 
Monday, Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m. at the hospital. The 
hospital is located at 1060 First Colonial Road. 

Dillon will discuss head-injured individuals. 

Call 48 1 -8272 for more information. 

TooiMigo Diahotos Is Biscossod 

A teen-age diabetes support group will meet on 
Monday, Feb. 21 , at 7:30 p.m. in the Nursing Arts 
Lab, section B, of Virginia Beach General 
Hospital (1060 First Colonial Road, Virginia 
Beach). 

Ail teenagers with diabetes are invited to attend. 

For further details, call 481-8183. 

Tuesday 

Bysloxia Topic At Broat Nock 

Dr. Don H. Bivins, neurologist, and Barbara 
McGronan, a reading dianostician with the 
Virginia Beach City Schools, will lecture and an- 
swer questions about dyslexia on Tuesday, Feb. 22 
at 7:30 p.m. at the Great Neck Area Library. 
Dyslexia is a reading impairment resulting from 
genetic defects or brairt injury. 
t Dr. Bivins will discuss dyslexia and describe the 
results of his research into this impairment. 
McGronan and Bivins will be available to answer 
questions after the lecture. Registration in advan- 
ce for the lecture is required. Interested in- 
dividuals may register by contacting the library at 
481-6094. 

Old South And Sla vory 

Derris Raper, Associate Professor of history at 
the Virginia Beach Campus of Tidewater Com- 
munity College, will lecture on the "Old South 
and Slavery" on Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 7:30 p.m. in 
the Windsor Woods Area Library in Virginia 
Beach. Raper's lecture will be the fourth in a series 
of programs highlighting American History Mon- 
th at the library. Registration in advance for the 
very-popular Raper's lecture is required. 

Interested older students and adults may 
register by contacting the library at 340-1043. 

'CATV iorvoi' Is Schodolod 

Cox Cable Tidewater, Inc., will sponsor a 
"CATV Forum" on Tuesday, Feb. 22 at 1 1 a.m. at 
the Beach Theatre, 25th Street and Atlantic 
Avenue. 

All Virginia Beach developers and businessmen 
are invited to attend. 

Champagne and hors d'oeuvres will be served. 

Call Buck Cowling, 490-1092, for more informa- 
tiai. 

U pcomin g 

MaxdaClohMooH 

The Mazda RX-7 Club of Tidewater, will hold 
its monthly meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 23, at 
7:30 p.m. in the customer service lounge of the 
Pembroke Mazda Dealership, Virginia Beach. 

The club will sponsor "How to do it to your 
RX-7" on Feb. 27, at 1 p.m. This event is designed 
to teach you how to tune, maintain, and modify 
(if you want) your RX-7. Refreshments will be 
served. 

For further information, contact Clyde Hill, 
463-3066. 

Plastic Sorfory At Bcoaoffroot 

Dr. Richard Mladick, Virginia Beach plastic 
niregon, will lecture and offer a slide presentation 
when he discusses "New Techniques in Plastk 
Surgery" on Wednesday, Feb. 23. at 7:30 p.m. in 



the Oceanfront Area Library. Mladick will include 
a description of the new "fat suction" process and 
discuss the practical applications of the technique. 

Dr. Mladick will answer questions from the 
audience. Registration in advance for the lecture 
and slide presentation is required. 

Interested adults may register by contacting the 
library at 428-4113. Dr. Mladick's lecture is 
presented in cooperation with the General 
Hospital of Virginia Beach. 

Wlodsor Woocb NosH Mhos 

"Blue Dashiki" and "Whistle for Willie" will 
make up a one-half hour film program for 
children three to 12 years of age on Wednesday, 
Feb. 23 at 4 p.m. in the Windsor Woods Area 
Library in Virginia Beach. Members of the family 
are invited to participate with the children in the 
film program. Children and parents may learn 
more about the films by calling the library 340- 
1043. 



Of Note 

LittiB Miss NBptURB 

The 1983 Tenth Annual Virginia Beach Neptune 
Festival is now accepting applications for Little 
Miss Neptune. Little Miss Neptune will accom- 
pany King Neptune and his Royal Court as they 
reign over the annual festival from Sept. 28 
through Oct. 2. 

Applicants must be at least four years of age on 
Jan. 1, 1983 and not more than seven years of age 
on Oct. 1, 1983. All applications must be received 
no later than April 1, 1983 with final judging to be 
held on May 1st. 

Applications may be picked up at the Virginia 
Beach Chamber of Commerce, 4512 Virginia 
Beach Boulevard. For further information contact 
Mrs. Nancy Carney at 420-8331 . 

Tax Forms AvoilablB 

The Virginia Beach Public Library has both 
State and Federal income tax forms available plus 
instructions for each. Each of the area libraries 
placed its own orders for the forms, therefore, it 
would be wise to first call your library to ensure 
that it has the form you need. In addition, the 
Reference Division (located at the Bayside 
Library) has various tax servjces to help you 
prepare your federal forms. 

Why not call your area library today or call the 
Reference Division at 464-9485 

Crafto iooths AVollaUo 

Booths are available for the fifth annual Circket 
on the Hearth Craft Show, to be held July 8, 9 and 
10 at the Virginia Beach Pavilion. Information 
may be obtained from the registration chairman 
of Preceptor Alpha Xi Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi 
at 426-7697. Proceeds to benefit the Virginia 
Beach Sunwheelers, Inc. 
Call 499-3889 for more information. 



The Notre Dame Club of Southeastern Virginia 
is soliticiting Virginia Beach residents who are 
friends, students, alumni of the university. They 
are invited to attend the club's next meeting. Call 
Mike Oilman, 444-6405 for more information. 



Public Hearing 
Date: Monday, February 28, 1983 \ 

Time: 7:00 P.M. 

Place: City Council Chambers. Administration 
Building, Second Floor, Municipal Center, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Purpose: The City Council and the Housing and 
Community Development Citizen Advisory 
Committee wish to hear comments from in- 
dividual citizens, civic leagues and other groups 
and organizations on the following topics; 

I. Ninth Program Year Application 

The City of Virginia Beach, through its Ninth 
Program Year application, will apply for ap- 
proximately $2,600,000 in federal funds to im- 
plement community development activities. 

On the basis of comments given at recent public 
hearings, the following program activities are 
proposed for funding: 

Queen City Street and Drainage Improvements 
Newsome Farm Street and Drainage 

Improvements 
Mill Dam Street, Drainage, Water and Sewer 

Improvements 
Seatack Street. Phase 1 1 A, Drainage 

Improvements 
Seatack Street, Phase 114, and Drainage 

Improvements 
Riedtown Street, Drainage. Water and Sewer 

Improvements 
Rehabilitation 
Relocation 
Last Resort Housing 

II. Housing Assistance Plan (HAP) 

The City proposes to address the housing needs 
of low and modo'ate income persons by utilizing 
fe(kral propams for building new multi-family 
rental housing, renting existing housing and 
rehabilitating substandard housing. A new HAP 
is currently being develop^. 

If you cannot attend this hiring, please submit 
your comments to Ms. Malissia Lee, Information 
Specialist, Office of Housing and Community 
Development. 

Copies of the recommendations for the CDBG 
Ninth Program Year application are available 
from 9M A.M. to 5:00 P.M. at the Office of 
Housing and Cwnmunity Develo|»nent, 302 22nd 
Street, Virginia Beach, Virpnia 2545 1 , 422-3856. 



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■■li"Waia«HlMiiOT«BBSlVBVH 



4 Virginia Beach Sun, February 16, 1983 



Virsinia Beach Sun Hews 

Borough Parade 

In Princess Anne Borough 
A Place For Farmers' Wares 



Ibe Princess Anne Borough if in the ccitor «f 
Virginia Beacli, Ixmiered lij tke KcBptYDc 
Borougli and tlie Qty of Cbcsapenke to ito wait, 
by tlie Pnngo Borough to its soatti, hy the AdnMic 
Ocean to its east, and by the I^ranhaTcn Borough 
to the north. Princess AoBe'i poputatloa is 
estimated to be 44,507 accordag to a 1M2 
estimate. 

"Tilings will be better when the weather gets 
warmer," says E. Virginia Creekmore, as she 
surveys a somewhat vacant Farmer's Marlcet, 
where she sells everything from collards and 
cabbage to eggs, asparagus and blade molasses. 
"When it's cold like this, people don't come out 
too much." 

Creekmore busies herself on these lazy 
February days piecing together jigsaw puzzles 
and sharing a laugh with other merchants at the 
market. Every crnce in a while, her husband, 
Linwood. a retired longshoreman, pops in for a 
visit. 

"I probably haven't had but five or six 
customers all day," she says, with a smile. "I 
know (Mice the warm time of year comes there will 
be a lot of visitors in town. Hiat's when we'll do 
good." 

All her life, Creekmore has lived in WiigixM 
Beach. For the last five years she has operated a 
shop at the market called appropriately, "Oreek- 
mcwe's Place." 

"You know what I like best about this?" she 
asks. "It's the people. I get to meet so many good 
people." 



"I probably haven't had five or 
six customers all day. I know once 
the warm time of year comes there 
will be a lot of visitors in town. 
That's when we'll do 
good."— Farmer's Market mer- 
chant E. Virginia Creekmore 



The Farmer's Market, located in the Princess 
Anne Borough of Virginia Beach on Lindstown 
koad, is an entity of the dty gowenunant, 
supervised by dty penonnel and situated upon 
dty prc^rty. 

"The missicHi of the Fanner's Market is 
two-fdd," says market superintendent Ray 
Hutt(»i, Jr. "First, it provides a place where area 
farmers can bring their produce f0r sale. Second, 
it provides a place where the general public can 
buy fresh produce." Besides fruits and vege- 
tables, Huttcm said, customers can find meats, 
balKd goods, seaibod, dairy products, flowers and 
interior decn-ations. "We stay away from flea 
market items," he noted. 

The market offers 26 permanent spaces for 
leasing in a drcular mall-style fitcility. R'esently, 
21 local merchants sell their wares tliere. "You 
have to apply for space here," says IbittOB. "A 
management team reviews the applications and 
then we select people to fill whatever openings we 
have. Hopefully, in our great wisdom, we pick the 
people who will be the best for the market." 
Ibtton said the team indudes hinuelf, Agricul- 
ture Department Director E.R. Cockrell, Jr.. and 
representatives from the (rffices ai the dty 




manager and the dty attorney. "We seem to pick 
the right person about 98.6 percent of the time," 
he added. 

To lease enclosed spaces at the market, 
merchanu pay $35 per week. For qsen spaces 
without front doors, merchants pay $23. Addition- 
ally, the market offers 57 parking spaces for 
fiurmers to sell their produce from the backs of 
their trucks. For that opportunity, farmers pay 
either two ddlars per day or $12.50 per week. 



"Our purpose from day-one has never been to 
make money," says Hutton, explaining the 
seemingly low rates charged by the city. "Our 
only aim is to break even." 



*7/i the middle of April, things 
1^(7/ start to boom, with our peak 
period coming sometime inJal^or 
August.'* — Farmer's Market 
Superintendent Ray Hutton, Jr. 



January, February and March "are not prime 
months for the marlKt," says Hutton. "In the 
middle of >^ril, things will start to boom, with our 
peak period coming sometime in July or August." 
i^tton said the market has a number of special 
events throughout the year, including a yearly 
country fiur day in conjuncticm with the Neptune 
Festival, a Christmas Festival and Friday night 
hoedowns every week in the summer. 

The market has been at its present location 
since 1576. Previously, the market had been 
located since 1964 near Diamond Springs Road, 
ibttan has overseen the market's growth and 
development since becoming its supervisor in 
1970. "I love this place," he says. "I look at it as 
my baby." 




Blaize Named Outstanding Woman 



Blaize 



Virginia Beach resident 
Vivian E. Blaize has been 
selected as one of the Out- 
standing Young Women 
of Ammca fm 1962. Hie 
aimounconent has been 
made by Mrs. Dexter Otis 
Arnold. Chair of the 
organization's Advisory 
Board. 

Blaize is Director of 
Public Relations for WT- 
VZ. Channd 33, a 
position she's held ance 
August 1981. Prior to 
that, she was Public Af- 
fain IMrectOT for WQRK 
radio fmr three ytan. 



Outstanding Young 
Women of America are 
chosen from each of the 
SO states and tiie District 
of Columbia. Awards are 
presented on the basis of 
achievement and leader- 
ship qualities in 
profession, community, 
uid po^onal lives. Less 
than a third of possible 
candidates are selected 
annually by the Board of 
Advison. 



Blaize is married to 
Cuthbert (Sonnic) Blaize, 
and they reside in Virginia 
Beach with their children, 
Stanley and Ashanti. 





MARGO 

AMERICAN 
PALMIST 



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Virsinia Beach Sun Hews 



Virginia Beach Sun. February 16. 1983 S 



In Kempsville 



Road Improvements Okayed 



Hans to improve a sec- 
ti(xi of Kempsville Road 
(VA 190) in Virginia 
Beach have been approv- 
ed by the State Highway 
and Transporution Com- 
mission. 

The project invdves a 
1.6-mile section of road- 
way between Indian River 
Road and Centerville 
pike. Plans call for widenr 
ing the road to provide 
two 12- foot lanes for each 
direction of travel, sepa- 
rated by a 16-foot- wide 
raised median. 

Left-turn lanes will be 
provided at intersecting 
streets, and curb and 



JARBONLESS 



gutter will be installed oa 
each side of the roadway. 
Also, a new stOTm drain- 
age system will be built as 
part of the project. 

Four-foot-wide side- 
walk and three-foot-wide 
utility strip will be con- 



structed on the east side 
of the road, and plans call 
for an eight-foot bikeway 
on the west side. 

The project will be a 
continuation of improve- 
ments to Kempsville Road 



Kappers Talks Gunman 
Into Surrendering To Police 




Virginia Beach Police 
Sergeant Danny Kappers 
recently persuaded a gun- 
man, who had killed one 
man and injured another, 
to turn himself over to 
authorities. 

James Wes Taylor, 
charged with first-degree 
murder, malicious 
assault, use of a firearm in 
commission of a felcwiy, 
and discharging a firearm 
in an occupied building, 
shot and killed Beverly 
"Biff Wilkerson'. presi- 



dent of B & F Tire and 
Recapping Co., at 5548 
Virginia Beach Boulevard. 
TaylOT refused to surren- 
der to police until 
Kappers, over the tele- 
phone, convinced him to 
do so. 

According to reports. 
Taylor sh« the men be- 
cause he was angry over a 
lire deal. The injured man 
was Peter B. Smith, the 
company's vice president 
and general manager. 



that the Qty of Virginia 
Beach has had under can- 
structioa between Provi- 
dence and bidian River 
Roads. 

In 1981, department 
studies showed that traffic 
vcdumes cm Kempsville 
I^)ad ranged from S.SOO 
vehicles per day near 
Centerville Turnpike 
intersection to 15,600 
vehicles per day near the 
Indian River Road. Engi- 
neers estimate that by the 
year 2005 these counts 
will rise to 18,200 and 
29,200 respectively. 

The preliminary engi- 
neering will cost about 
$540,000 and will be paid 
for by the Qty of Virginia 
Beach. Construction is 
estimated at $4.2 million 
and will be paid iox with 
77 percent federal funds, 
18 percent state funds, 
and 5 percent city funds. 

Constructicm is expect- 
ed to begin in 1984. 




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Corner RosemonI and Holland Kd. 

463-0602 



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(«rj) 




Voice Of The People 

Should City Tax Use Of Beach? 



"/ think it is a good 
idea, realiy. Beaches in 
New Jersey tax the 
people and they seem to 
get a good response. Be- 
cause Virginia Beach is a 
tourist town, such a tax 
would bring in lots of 
money. It would be a 
good way for the city to 
make ends meet. I don't 
think a user fee would 
keep people away from 
Virginia Beach because 
they go to the beach to 
spend money anyway. " 
Cindy Evans 
Jewelry Clerk 
Nine-month resident 



"If the city were to tax 
people for using the 
beach, it would only be 
hurting itself in the long 
run. There is already a 
large tax on the hotels 
and on the restaurants. 
If we tax the beach too, 
people are not going to 
come here. We need to 
bring things to this city 
that will attract tourists 
here. I know I wouldn't 
go down to the beach if I 
had to pay for it. We are 
taxed to death as it is 
already, " 

Catherine Morris 

Sales Consultant 

15-year resident 



"It would be okay If 
people were to be 
charged for parking their 
vehicles at the beach, 
maybe. I think that 
would probably be the 
only justifiable way of 
imposing such a fee 
without hassling them 
too much. I think such a 
move makes sense. 
Despite charging people 
money, I'm sure they 
would come to the beach 



anyways. 



Joanna Maddron 

Library Page 

16-year resident 



"I think a user fee for 
the beach would beflnt. 
I look at it this way: If I 
was living at the beach 
and I wanted to go to tht 
mountains. I wouldn't 
mind having to pay for 
it, as long as It wasn't 
too much, like a doUm 
or something. No matter 
what, the beach is stUI 
the beach) and I'm surt 
the people would pay for 
it if they had to." 

Sandy Throckmorton 

Library Assistant II 

20-year resident 



Citizen Of The Week 




Van Pelt 



THE 

BEACH 

SATURDAY 

BANK. 




Central MiMv BmH 



VIRGINIA BEACH LOCATIONS 



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CHINESE CORNER OFFICE 

3013 Virfinu Buck Blvd. 

INDIAN RIVER OFFICE 

631) IndwiRivcT Road 

KEMPSVILLE OFFICE 

SDI Pnncea Anne Road 

TOm. MACHINE (24 ham twikiit) 



LASKIN ROAD OFFICE 

I60t Lukin Road 

TIME MACHINE (24 hour banlintj 

LVNNHAVEN OFFICE 

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SatnrriR) 



The Buk Itat Wwks to Virgiiiians. 

rFOIC 



Helping Others 
Help Themselves 



The Citizen-of-thc-Week this week is Sharon 
Vaa Pciti a -case manager at the Beach House, a 
center- 'Am- "meoMHy and emotionaiiy disturbed 
Virginia Beach citizens. 

Van Pelt, who has volunteered more than 500 
hours answering Emergency Services telephone 
lines for the city's Comprehensive Mental Health 
and Retardation department, has gained a great 
deal of recognition in her short 23 years. "Sharon 
has an awfuriotTo offer this world," satys Jo Ann 
Clegg, volunteer services coordinator for the 
Emergency Services department. "Everyone here 
is so impressed with her. She is such a hard worker 
and she is genuinely interested in helping people." 

"The thing I like about what I do is the con- 
tact," says Van Pelt, who still moonlights one 
night per week answering telephone calls from 
distressed people. "I deal with all sorts of 
problems: family problems, depressed* people, 
people contemplating suicide. 

"You try to provide whatever help you can to 
these people in their time of need," explaiiu Van 
Pelt. "It feels really good when someone says, 
'thank you, you've really helped me.'" 

Van Pelt, who studied social work at Longwood 
College, from which she graduated in 1981, says 
she is committed to her field. "I can't see me 
working in any other profession," she says. "1 
draw my greatest satisfaction from knowing I'm 
doing my small part for the community. I would 
like to see more people show an interest and get 
involved helping their fellow man." 

Van Pelt, a lifelong Virginia Beach resident, 
resides in Green Run with her husband, Jeff, who 
is an Emergency Services counselor. Sharon's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Spiotta and Jeffs 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Neil Van Pelt, are Virginia . 
Beach residents as well. 



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6 Virginia Beach Sun. February 16, 1983 



1 , 

Virsinia Beach City Council By u.cahin 



Beach Council Actions 



A.I 
Bteck water 



NMcyA.CiMcii 
Al-Lai|c 



BwbMaM.Hnky 

Puto 



HwoM HctackolMr 
Al-Lante 



H.JackJcwrim 
LynalMvea 



L«Hys8.J< 
Bay$idc 






RokcrtG.JoMi 
Al-LM|e 



W. H. KUcUa, III 
Vtogiaia Beach 



itelMS.McClaaMi 
PriaccnAaac 



J. Hcai> McCoy, Jr. 
KcoMMvyic 



Mcycra OberadiMf 
Al-Laf|c 



Meeting Date, Monday, February 14, 1983: Absent: N. Creech 



* Informal Session 



A letter from Coag r eM iiu i n >ferb Bateman which indkalef) 
Ws tuppoft of the poMiiiark, "Hamixon Roads, VA," was 
read. 



Mrs. LUian DeVianey was named chairperson of the Gover- 
nor's Task Force on Drunk Driving for Virginia Beach. Mem- 
bers for the commtttee have been selected and will be announ- 
ced in the near future. 



Danny Barkin, formerly a City Council reporter for the 
Virginia Beach Beacon, was congratulated for his recent 
promotion to Associate Editor of The yirginkn-PUot/Ledter 
Star. 



District on a 152.8-acre parcel located south of London Bridge 
Road, east of Shipps Corner Road (Princess Anne Borough). 
Approved, 10-0. 

C hy rc h Appll^t 

Application of the Trustess and Ofricial Board of Suburban 
Christian Church for a conditional use permit for a church 
with additions and related facilities on a 2.867-acrf parcel 
located on the northwest and southwest comers of Meighan 
Drive and Bellamy Manor Drive (Kempsville Borough). Ap- 
provnl, 104). 

DayCar# 

Application of Charles Vernon Craig and Christie Gilluly 
Craig for a condition use permit for a home occupation 
(operation of Mother's Helper, Inc., a licensed family day care 
referral system) on a 17,084.33-square foot parcel located 
along the east side of AUman Court on Lot 32, Block G (Kem- 
psville Borough). Approved, for two yean, 10-0. 



if Formal Session 



•Request of CUef Charles Wall to name the proposed Police 
Department Trainini Center the "Daniel T. Maloney Training 
Center." Approved. IM. 

•Restriution to o^xMe Senate BUI 66 and preserve the rights 
of Virgiaia Besch Qtbeils tor the pHvilqje bf cable TV. Ap- 
proved. 1(H). ' , » 

•Retoliition 4>proving the major design features ot &m 
Neck Road, Phase II, and requesting the Virignia Department 
of Highways and Transporution to proceed with the adver- 
tisenjcnt for construction bids. Approved, 1(H). 

•Resohition to accept offer of Messrs. Harry L. Solomon, 
Jr., V^rimam J. Jones, and WUIiam E. Conklin; and resolution 
to accept offer of Messrs. Oscar E. Parkw, Jr.^ John J. 
-Krtieis, M.D., R. Lawremx Smith, Bill R. Beach, and Nor- 
man J. Zwahlm. Approved, with appropriate letter of thanks 
todowN^, 1(H). 

•Ordinance to authorize the acquisition of property in fee 
simple for right-of-way for Ocean Park Drainage Project, 
Phues I and II, and the acquisition of temporary and per- 
manent easements of right-of-way, cither by agreement dr by 
comimination. Ajniroved, 1(H>. 

•OnfiMUKe on first reading to appropriate funds of $547 to 
the PiAce DepartmeM and taxTease estimated revenues in the 
Geoerd Fund. Approiwd, 1(H). 

•Ordinaace to traiofer appro|Hiations between Capital 
Projects to dose-out comi^eted cSyxtal Projecu. Approved, 
10-0. 

•Ordtoaoce to transfer $465,600.00 within the Community 
Devdopment Prt^rara. Deferred to Feb. 28 meeting, 100. 

•Ordinance appoimii^ viewers in the petition of Thomas M. 
Vojtek, Riu K. Vojtek, Thomas G. Harty, and Irma C. Harty 
for the closure of a portioa of Lynn Shores Drive, between 
Bba Street and Rumford Lane (Bayade Borough). Approved, 
IW>. 
•Raffe Permiu wwe granted to: Greater Tidewater Chaptn 

Sweet Addiocs: and James K. Cole Memorial ScbobusMp 

FiHid. Ltd. Approved, 1(H). 



Application of Anne Hile for a conditional use permit for 
boarding horses on a 10.15-acre parcel located along the west 
side of Rusbuldt Lane, southwest of Salem Road (Kempsville 
Borough). Approved, for two yean with a maximum of 17 
horses. 10-0. 



Application of Ruby Anne Dunn for a change of zoniag 
from A- 1 Apartment District I B-4 R^ort-Commcrcial District 
on a 14,000-square foot parcel located along the south side of 
34th Street, 150 feet west of Pacific Avenue (Virginia Beach 
Borough). Approved, with amended conditions, 10-0. 



Application of Tony Annarino, Jr., Inc. for a chanfe of 
zoning from A-1 Apartment District to B-7 Community- 
Business District on an 18,300-square foot parcel located on 
the southeast comer of Bonney Road and South Kentucky 
Avenue (Kempsville Borough). Denied, 10-0. 



Application of Mr. and Mrs. Allen M. Holmes, Fred and 
Elizabeth Soles, George B. and Edith K. Shields, and Michael 
Wilcox for a change of zoning from R-7 Residential District to 
A-4 Apartment District on 32,500-square foot parcel located 
along the southeast comer of 24th Street and Mediterranean 
Avenue (Virginia Beach Borough). Deferred until March 14, 
1983, 1(H). 

ModlfflcullQB 

Application of Terry Corporation of Virginia and Tim- 
berlake Associates for a modification to the Land Use Plan of 
Timberlake to include apartment sites on 1 1 .5 acres located on 
the east side of Independence Boulevard, north of South Plaza 
Trail (Kem[»ville Borough). Approved, 9- 1 . Oberndorf dissen- 
ting. 



it Planning Items 



OrtSaaace dod^ vacating and discontinuing a portion of 
an ummproved aUey located bdweoi Virginia Beach Boukvard 
and 18th Street in the petition of Peter J. Guakni and Joseph 
J. Gualeni (Lynnhaven Borough). (This nuuier was deferred on 
Novembff 22, 1982, on January 24, 1983, and for an ad- 
ditional week on February 7, 1983.) Approwi. 10-0. 



Ordnance doraig. vacatifl« and tfiKxmtinuing a 15-foot 
alfcy located between Atkntic Avenue and Mynle Avenue 
north of 46th Stre« in tlMU^(» of Claud P. Brownky III. et 
al (Lynnhaven BorougbgrThis appUcatuMi was expedited for 
5f«™»« « ^ Ptaaii^::oinmiwoo February 8ih and City 
Council Fetmiary 14. I9»3.) Apprtmd. 1(H). 



Application of Colonial-Laskin Associates, a Virginia 
Limited Partnership for a conditional use permit for 
recreational facilities on an outdoor nature (family amusonent 
park) and an arcade building on a 30-acre parcel located along 
the west side of First Colonial Road, south of Laskin Road 
(Lynnhaven Borough). Denied, 9-1 , Kotoen Jones dissenting. 

if Ordinances - 

CabtoT.V. 

Ordinance on first reading to appropriate funds of $10,380 
for cabHecasting City Council meetings. Lost to tie vote. Voting 
nay were: J. Baum, H. Hdschober, W. Kitchin, R. McClaaan, 
and L. Jones. 

if Appointments 



Personnel Board ai^intments rescheduled until Feb. 28 
meeting. 



Gateway FreewiO B^xist CSiurch: Request of RevereiKl Dak 
Buriten to ddete Q»ttian Number 3: "A »-foot dedication 
for the froolace on Vir^ida Bcaidi Boukvard, 80 feet from the 
coMtructwo cettcriine <rf the meditt. to^ha with a variabk 
width permanent ifrun^iecaMment along the western property 
Bne where it iatmecu the propeaed right-of-way of Virginia 
Beach Boukvard." (This conditiooal use pwmit was approved 
n-0. April 19. IW2; and. the request of 2/7/83 was sfcferred 
one week toc 2/14/83.) Item deferred to allow applicant to 
rea^rfy for conditiooal use penmt tlvough normal fm-occss, 9- 
I ; McClai^ dbi^tuig. 

K«y«Oil 

C^te «rf 2o«ag from R-8 Re»dential District to B-2 
Co mn ai Mt y-B^BeM Dterict on a 21,000-square fo« parcel 
located alo^ the touth tide of Vv^aia Beach Boulevard, west 
of Sykes Avmie (Ljmkava Borou^); and Conditional use 
permit for a self -service wtomohae iervice rtadon on a 4 1 .850- 
square foot pw<xi hx^ on the southwest comer of Virginia 
BeKh Boukvtfd aad ^rkes Avenue (LyTuOmvea Bormuh) 
Apjwoved, 1<H). 



The Planning Council: Appointed was Meyera Ob^ndorf 
for fifth oiM-year term. 

if Unfinished Business 



Application of McDonald's fraiKhise at 28th Street and 
Atlantic Avenue for an>roval of their proposed addition to a 
nonconforming structure. (This matter was deferred on 
November 22, 1982, and on December 6, 1982.) Denial, 7-3. 
Dissenting: J. Jennings, H. McO^, R. McClanan. 

SeeAGENDA, PageU 



Ap(*cajoo of Rotart P. Brea. Jr., and Clafrace J. Smith. 
Ill for a conditioaaJ use pemrit for a duplex on a 5,795-square 
foa pKcel located along the north side of Pinewood Drive, 
west of MedMOTaoeui AvoMe (LynaiM««n Boroi^). Ap- 
proved, HH). 



AppikWion of Unda T. Qmf^m for a conditi«al use per 
nut for a B^k-family dwd^ m the AG-1 Afficultural 



X 



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(804) 721-3839 



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Electric Heat & Power Savers 
Antenna & Intercom Systems 
Central Vacuum Installations 

Systems Prewiring 

Telephone Wiring 



"Eyesore" On 24th Street 




Council Gives Investors 
Chance To Ease ''Sore'- 



) 



,d 



(Ti 



Investors in property on 24th Street, ctmsidered an 
"eycswe," will be given another chance oa March 14 
to put their pro|>osal for improvement before Virginia 
Beach Gty Council. 

A tie vote (S-3) Monday afternoon on a rezoning 
request for the property, on the southeast comer of 
24th Street, gave the applicanu the option to have the 
item reconsidered. 

The applicants are Mr. and Mrs. AUen M. Holmes, 
Fred and Elizabeth Soles, Oorge B. and Edith K. 
Shields and Michael Wilcox. They asked fn- a change of 
zoning from R-7 Residential District to A-4 i^iartment 
District on a 32,500 square-foot parcel along the 
southeast comer of 24th Street and Mediterranean 
Avenue. 

Area residents objected to the rezoning because of 
the higher density it would bring to the neighborhood. 

In zoiing matters, applicants have the option of 
having the item reheard in case of a tie. 

Seven structures now exist on the site ~ Soles said 
(wo are vacant. The applicants had wanted to build 22 
rental units on the site, although A-4 zoning would 
permit 27. TTie Planning Department found that the 
density was not compatible with the surrounding area. 
However, the banning Conunission recommended 
approval. 

Sdes said the present buildings are physically and 
economically obsolete and the cost of rehabilitation 
atrocious. He said the area is one of the greatest 
eyesores at the beach. He said the investors want to 
build structures for permanent residents rather than 
transients. 

Realtor George Owens said that the density was 
determined according to what would be economically 
fesible. He said that the taxes from the present 
prc^rty amount toS1600 but would be S10,000 a year 
with the improvements. He said the investors have a 
$254,658 mortgage on the property. 

Mayor Louis R. Jones said the mortgage was not the * 
problem facing C^buncil. 

Michael LaGiglia. representing the Old Beach Gvic 
League, said that the duplexes on the parcel were not 
representative of the area. He objected to higher 
density. He said it was not the burden of the city to bail 
out every borrower. 



Sdes said he realized that he paid too much for the 
property. He said he cttisidered the Council and the 
people a team and he needed help. 

Councilman W.H. Kitchen III said that the decision 
w|is not easy because the prt^rty has been an eyesore 
for 12 years. He said there are several pockets of decay 
in the Borough and "I don't think we can distinguish 
this one from the others." He said there was no doubt 
that council was going to lock at the b<x-ough and come 
up with a plan. He said that certain areas were not 
necessarily always to remain single-family neighbor- 
hoods. 

He said that while Sotes is an honorable person; 
absentee owners can come in and allow property to 
deteriorate so that they can come in say they want to 
upgrade the neighborhood provided they get rezming. 

He moved to deny the petition. 

Mayor Jones asked whether the applicants could live 
with 18 units. 

Kitchin said he was not in favor of negotiating a 
change in the petition at Council meeting. He said that 
the owners may then build something substandard that 
they don't want to build. 

He said that Council would be talking about doubling 
the density on any petition which ccmies in. 

Soles said that it would be difTicult to get eight 
coitiguous prc^rty owners. 

Vice Mayor Barbara Henley seccmded Kitchin's 
motion. 

Councihnan Harold Ifeischober made a substitute 
motion for approval oS Ar3 zoiing. Councilman Dr. J. 
Ifenry McO^ seconded that notim. The vote was tied 
with Henley, Mayor Jones, Robert G. Jones, Kitchin 
and Meyera Oberndorf dissenting. 

A motion limiting the units to 1^ also tied with 
Councihnan John A. Baum, Heischober, Jennings, 
Reba McQaiian and McCoy dissenting. 



News Tip? 
Gall 



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486-3430 




TAKEADVilNTAGEDFTH»SP||SI«i;jWLE! 

Butler 
liiiundlilf 

Buildings 





3J 



FARMSTED I 



FARMSTED H 



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F.O. 



50x14 in COLOR 
Solid endwall 
20' X 13' door 
Lite Panis 
B. Plant 



36x75x14 In COLOR 
1 — Solid endwati 
1 — 18' X 13' door 
6 — Lite PanIs 



SI 

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List Price — $ 9313. List Price — $13,677. 

SPECIAL PRICE- ^286. plus tax SPECIAL PRICE - ^23 1 . pi 



us tax 



30x30x11 in COLOR 
1 — Solid endvi/all 
1— 16'x10'5"door 
F.O.B. Plont 



48x50x14 In COLOR 
1 — Solid endwall 
1—24x13' door 
4 — Lite Ponls 



List Price — $4782. List Price — $1 2,475. 

SPECIAL PRICE - ^3228. plus tax SPECIAL PRICE - ^8420. pi 



What about erection 
and concrete? 

We con dd it, you con 
do It, or we can 
do it together. 

Ask obout our self- 
erection package. 



Fr*i(^t, •rection and concrvt* 
must b« add«d to the** pricM. 



C4U couf cr 
Bruce Brown 

Office: (919) 398-3116 
Home: (919) 398-5342 



us tax 



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Our buildings include lit* 
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Our buildings include big 
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others do not.) 

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BUILDINGS 

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TELEPHONE 919-398-3116 



MURFREESBORO. NORTH CAROLINA 27855 



jgm^^^i^^'^i^mww r^ 



Virginia Beach Sun, February 16, 1983 7 



T 



Virolnla Beach Sun News 



Council, School Board Members Mixed Over Direct Elections 



ContimMd from Pate 1 
referring to council's interview i^ocess for perspective 
board mnnben. 

Henley said that direct elections of school board 
members would allow more "direct acccMmtability" of 
the school board maobai to the {Hiblic. 



'*The council needs a committee to 
interview every person who submits a 
resume to serve on the school board 
. . . Henley 



"Now they are insulated and do not have to put them- 
selves before the public," Hentey said. "We answer for 
them and that is very ackward. We make the appdnt- 
ments to the school board but we have to be roponsible 
for them also. We (council) don't have the r^t to 
suggest things to them (the school board). We have been 
told that very emphatiodly. " 

Remembering the rigors of campugning for public 
office, Henley admits some of the better school board 
candidates might be reluctant to serve on the school 
board for that reason. 

"Iliat's very true and is one of the drawbacks," she 
said. "But the same drawback also holds tru^ for City 
Council." 

Vif^^ala Beack Mayor Loals R. Joaca said he is not 
opposed, from what he knows of it, to Heidey's idea of 
the council creating a special review committee for 
talent bank applicants. 

"It sounds like it has some merit," he said. "I 
wouldn't be opposed as long as they (committee mem- 
bers) were memben of council." 

Jones said he did dot sunwrt the ddegates' bill 
because he thought it might mi^ead the pubUc. 

"My concern with the bUl was that the public would 
expect only those people who would get the major sup- 
port at the public hearing to be appointed to the school 
board," he said. Jones said the public might be "led to 
believe" that those persons supported at the public 
hefuings would automatically become school board 
members. 



"My concern with the bill was that 
the public would expect only those 
people who would get the major sup- 
port at the public hearing tQj|c^pg9in-- 
tep . . . " - Mayor Jorifes * 



Jones also said the proposed bill was "too restrictive" 
because T)f the stipulation that <mly those people whose 
names appeared on a iniblic list or at the bearing (xnild 
be (^nsido-ed for appdntment. 

"Some people might not be able to attend the hearing 
because of business or health." he ncMed. 

Jones is against the populv election of school board 
officiids and is cogniant of Mrs. McClanan's concerns. 

"Mrs. McClanan has a sincere interest in trying to 
resolve what she sees as a problon," he said, "and we 
all have a responsibility to hear what she has to say and 
present to the council." 



Jones said the city council is well equipped with the 
power to make sure the appointees remain accountable 
for thdr actions. 

"The city council holds them accountable." Jones 
said. "If they don't perform in a manner we feel they 
should, we don't reappoint them." 

Jones said he is not entirely content with the current 
system of selecting school board members, but he "has 
not heard of anything better yet." 

At*lar^ CoBMdlmaa Robert G. Joacs said the ap- 
pointment issue "was blown out of proportion." 

Jones is not in favor in popularly elected school board 
monbers but is in favor "of making it an option fCH- 
localities." 

Regarding the idea of mandatory public hearings 
before school board appointments, Jones is not in favor 
of that because "it would pile regulations on regulations 
and there's too much of that now." 

"Thwe's only so much you can do with rules and 
regulations," he added. 

Jones said the existing r^ulations under which coun- 
cil already works can be "pretty burdensome," and that 
additional ones would be "another imposition on 
time." 

"It's fair to say that the school board 
appointment process was the most 
political thing I was involved with on 
council'* - Bob Jones 



Jones said he is not entirely content with the current 
school board selection process and understands Mrs. 
McClanan's complaints over it. 

"I'm sympathic with the problem that Mrs. Mc- 
Clanan perceives concerning the manner ill which the 
school board members were appointed this time." Jones 
said. 

"It's fair to say that the school board appointment 
process was the most political thing I was involved with 
on council." Jones continued. 

Concerning the school board's accountability for the 
decisions they make, Jones responded, "that's a very 
difficult question. If the school i>oard was unresponsive 
to demands for a quality school system I would get 
really upset." % 

Al-iargc Councilman Harold Hdschobcr said that 

most procedures, over time, allow room for improve- 

^ment.»But one of the reasons be pppotedsumTorting 

t MdC^an's bill was bcoausc oi th«^waf ft was taitro- 

ducnl to council. 

"My first instinct was that it was in- 
troduced improperly witliout the 
knowledge, understanding and support 
of city council." - Heischober 



"My first instinct was that it was introduced im- 
properly without the knowledge, understanding and 



support of city council," he said. Before Heischober 
decides whether he is in favor of popularly elected 
school board members, he said he'll wait for a recom- 
mendation from Richmond. 

But in geno-al terms, he said "1 think all processes 
can be improved from time to time. I'm open to any 
suggestion which leads to a better method." 

Former woMyw and KemiMville Councilman J. Heary 
McCoy Jr., said he didn't like the way the bill was 
presented to council. 

"The whole thing is unfortunate 

. . . It might be that we want to go to 

the public election of the school board 

..." - McCoy 

"The whole thing is unfortunate," McCoy said. "If 
Glenn and Julie had tried to talk to us before they did it. 
I mean, let's not be Mickey Mouse about it. It might be 
that we want to go to pubhc election of the school board 
members." 

McCoy is opposed to the idea of mandatory public 
hearings before school board appointments because "so 
many council people are swayed by imput from civic 
groups. But some arc also swayed by business." 

McCoy also said that by holding public hearings, it 
would reflect on a notion that the council had not been 
making proper appointments in the past. 

"Sure, that is how I would look at it," he said. "But 
when you get down to appointments, it is the political 
plum system with democracy. You will get better people 
if you appoint them; some good people will not subject 
themselves to campaigning. ' ' 

McCoy said that the controversy over school boundry 
redistricting and the naming of a new elementary school 
nuy have prompted the appointment issue. 

"When the public couldn't move the school board 
they went to city council," he said. 

McCoy said the delegates' bill was "blackmail" 
because council was issued a "if you don't do this we 
won't do that," proposition. 

He said the bill was being "ramroded down council's 
ftiroat," and that Delegate McClanan "should concen- 
trate more of his efforts on roads." 

James Chapman, president of the Vliginla Beach 
Education Association, said he would not "object to the 
right (of Virginia Beach) to have the local option" of 
popularly electing school board members. 

Concerning Mrs. McClanan's assertion that there 
needs to be more imput in the selection of school board 
members." Chapman said "we certainly don't disagree 
U^ith that." 
* ■ 

Caliis Against Direct Election 

Virginh BeKh School Board Vice Chairmaa Robert 
H. Callls. Jr., Virginia Beach Borough, said he is op- 
posed to the idea of popularly electing school board 
members. 

"I'm against an elected school board." he said. 

Regarding mandatory public hearing before school 
appointments are made, he commented, "they (city 
council) have to set the groundrules as far as I'm con- 
cerned." 

One of the school board's newest members. Mrs. 
Sosan Flanlgaa. Pungo. sees no reason to change the 
proent selection process of school board members. 

"I think the present system is suitable," she said. "I 



don't object to the P.T.A.'s holding their hearings." 

"It would be good for more public 
imput. But some good qualified people 
might hesitate because of the scrutiny 
..." - Flanigan 



But the question of mandatory public hearings, 
Flanigan said, has its pros and cons. 

"I can see in one way it might be good, but in another 
way it might not," she said. "It would be good for more 
public imput. But some good qualified people might 
hesitate because of the scrutiny before the public." 

She said if the school board was elected by direct elec- 
tion the process may turn "into a popularity contest. 
Some quiet and reserved people, who would be good for 
the board, might not run." 

Flanigan said she would not have campaigned to serve 
on the school board . 

"I would not. That's exactly right," she said. "I'm 
gkd to be a public servant and pleased that I was ap- 
pointed." 

Dr. Roy A. Wooda, la his second term as chairman of 
the Vir^Bla Beach School Board, and a member of the 
board since 1966. said he has no problem with public 
hearings before school board appointments are made, 
provided the implementation of the hearings is a blanket 
city policy. 



"If they have that right I see nothing 
wrong with elected school boards. But I 
would expect them to represent the en- 
tire city, not just their borough" - 
Chairman Woods 



"If they're going to do it for all committees I see 
nothing wrong with it," he said. "But if you're going to 
do it just for the school board I'm agahut it." 

Woods is somewhat in favor of direct election of 
school board members provided the elected members 
have the right to set the tax rate on whatever local tax 
overwhich the board was given control. 

"If they have that right I see nothing wrong with . 
ted school boards," he said. "But I would expect the 
members to represent the entire city, not just their 
borough." 

Woods said that under the present school board selec- 
tion procedure the coundl "has done an excellent job 
with the system." But he would "go along" with the 
direct elections because "it's being done all over the 
country." 

Woods agrees with the contention that the direct elec- 
tion of school board members might narrow the field of 
candidates. 

"That's exactly the way I feel," he said. "I'd never be 
on the board if I had to run." 

Woods also favors Henley's idea of creating a council 
committee to review talent bank applications. 

"I would see nothing wrong with that move," he 
said. "The more information we have about the can- 
didates the better." 




JEANS 
& 

CASUAL WEAR 



Cape Henry Women Awarded 



Continued from Page I 
bons, and Mrs. W.F. 
Jones won a red ribbon. 

In the needlepoint 
category, Mrs. George H. 
Mullahy. Jr. won a Mne 
ribbon, and Mrs. W.F. 
Jones won a red ribbon. 

In the quilting category, 
Mrs. B. Noel Faliwell won 
blue and yellow ribbOM, 



and Mrs. George S. 
Dozier won a red ribbon. 

In the smocking 
category. Mrs. Richard 
Coradl won a blue ribbon. 

In miscellaneous awar- 
ds. Mrs. James L. Craig 
won a blue ribbon, Mrs. 
ira Hancock won a red 
ribbon, and Mrs. H. 
Flaky Hatch won a yeiow 



ribbon. An honorable 
mention was bestowed 
upon Mrs. Eliiabcth 
MUer. 

In painting categories, 
Mrs. Peter B. Marx won 
Mue and red ribbons in the ' 
acrylic calgegory, and 
Mrs. David S. Willard 
won a blue ribbon in the 
oil category. 



n 



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8 Virginia Beach Sun, February 16, 1983 



Virjinia Beach Business & Real Estate Hews 




Racial Factors Influence 
Property Values 



Davenport Elected Chairperson 
Chesapeake Planning Commission 



The introduction of 
minorities, notably 
blacks, into a neighbor- 
hood can affect the price 
of housing and prqierty 
valutes. 

According to an article ^ 
by J.S. Fuerst and Susan 
M. SarcOTc, which ap- 
peared in the Fall/Winter 
editim of Real Estate 
Issues (RE I), propterty 
values fluctuate when 
large percentages of 
blacks enter an area. 
When minorities move 
into a neighborhood in 
small numbers, property 
values show little or no 
effect. 

In their article entitled 
"Race and Property 
Value: A Changing Con- 
cept," the authors pre- 
sent data on land and 
property values in various 
areas of Chicago's North 
and South sides, including 
Lincob Park and Hyck 
Park, and the suburban 
communities of Oak Park 
and Eviuiston. 



'To say that racial 



Nora While Davenpon was recently elected as chair- 
person of the Chesapeake Planning Commission. This 
marks the first time a woman has held this position. 
Nnta also was the second woman to be on the Planning 
C ornniisiion. 

Recently elected by the Chesapeake Chamber of 
Commerce, Woman's Division, as outstanding woman 
ol the yeai 1983, Nora is one busy woman who is 
dedicated to God*s work, her family, her community, 
her state and her country. 

She is a charier member of the Che^peake General 
HospTtal Auxiliary, and volunteer P//(A:Z.flr/v at Norfoll^-fectors play no part in 

Gtneral Hospital for the past 12 years and at the pr<verty values is not only 
( hesapeake General Ho^ital for about 6 years. an illusion, but it is mis- 
Nora is a member of many organizations including leading," write Fuerst 
ihe current president of the Eastern Virginia Chapter of and Sarcone in REl, the 
I upus Foundation. professional journal of the 

Cooperation... Strategy For Success 



Southern States Holds 
Annual Meeting 



American Society of Real 
Estate Counselors 
(ASREQ, "Ignoring race 
will neither make white 
pec^le stay nor enter an 
area, and it will not keep 
black people from bu]^ 
or renting in large num- 
bers." 

Several reasons apart 
from color are cited for the 
decline in property values 
in some communities 
where in-migration has 
taken place. Also, the 
entrance of blacks into an 
area often has resulted in 
the departure of white 
families, better known as 
the conventional theory of 
"white flight." The fears 
that white residents have 
of decreased property 
values may actually prove 
to be self-fulfilling: "Atti- 
tudes of white residents 
during transition, in parti- 
cular their fear of de- 
creased property values, 
establish the pace at 
which black families enter 
a neighborhood," say 
Fuerst and Sarcone. "the 
tendency of whites in a 
neighborhood to sell their 
homes at the first sign of 
black move-ins creates a 
surplus of housing, which 
results in depressed 
prices." 



Fuerst and Sarcone 
point out that Chicago's 
Hyde Park and Lincoln 
Park are exceptions to this 
phenomenon and illu- 
strate areas at the city 
that are becoming more 
receptive to moderate 
black entrance. From 1950 
through 1979. both of 
these areas experienced a 
steady increase in value 
despite black in-migra- 
tion. 

While acknowledging 
that the findings in their 
study are not conclusive, 
the authors emphasize 
positive sdutions: "revi- 
talization of all-black 
areas for those blacks who 
wish to live in black areas, 
plus the introduction of 
blacks into all-white 
areas. Only then will a 
truly cdor-blind hmising 
market exist in the United 
States," say Fuerst and 
Sarcone. 

The Fall/Winter 

edition of REI contains 
other articles of interest 
such as: "Urbui Site 
Assemblage: Getting It 
All Together" by James 
A. Austrian, CBE: "Tlie 
Context of Inner Qty Re- 
vitalization" by Jack 
Harris: " 



Virginia 
Beach 

m 



A Year of 
Celebratiorts 




Frances R. Phillip- (Mrs. Gewge G. Phillips, Jr.) has 
been elected to the Board of Trustees of Westminster- 
Canterbury in Virginia Beach. 

Mrs. Phillips is a member of First Presbyterian 
Church of Virginia Beach. She is a graduate of the 
Garrison Forest Schod in Garriscm, Maryland, and 
serves on the Board of Trustees there. She is also a 
member of the advisory committee of the Chrysler 
Museum. 

Tidewater To Elect 
Woman Of The Year 



i^ril 22, 1983, is the 
date for the Second 
Annual Awards and 
Recognition Luncheon for 
Outstanding Professicmal 
Women in Tidewater. 
This luncheon will recog- 
nize women in Tidewater 
who have excelled in the 
fields of professional 
sales, public relations, 
educaticHi, the creative 
arts, media, community 
service, public service, 
banking, law, and medi- 
cine. One woman-^iH-'be 
^aitt^d "WeWAf Of m-' 
Year."'-' ■■ ■- ■" -""-'=•■ 

The luncheon is spon- 
sored by leading Tide- 



water firms such as 
Xerox, Bank of Virginia, 
Lincoln National Insur- 
ance, Farm Fresh, WNIS, 
Rices Nachmans, Systems 
Management American, 
and Armada/Hoffler 

Those people wishing to 
nominate someone should 
do so by submitting the 
individuals' name and 
background informaticm 
to Mrs. Barbara H. Lewis, 
DireQt«-^Charm_Assqci- 
'atis.'^^fo Ja/ 
lyildingr N0«^„, 
23502. NCTnirialTcttis will 
be accepted until March 
15. 




Business 
Briefs 



R.K. Chevrolet/Alfa 
Romeo was appointed 
the Peugeot franchise in 
Virginia Beach by 
Eastern Anto 

Distributors, Norfolk 
and Peugeot Motors of 
America, Inc. ...Five 
new members were elec- 
ted to the board of 
trustees at the Vtafioia 
Beach Arts Center: 
Homer W. Cunninfham, 
John M. Davis, Rkhard 
H. Kline, Roger M. Pier- 
ce and Edward C. 
Kellam... Sparks Tune 
Up Inc., a franchise 
operated by MAACO 
Enterprises Inc., opened 
in Virginia Beach and is 
the first such spKMtfy 
tune up and oil change'^ 
lube center in the 
area. ..The Virginia 
Chapter of the Hotel 
Sales Management 
Association elected Bar- 
bara F. Bailey, director 
of sales at the Sheraton 
Inn-Military Circle, as 
president of the 
association... T J. Maxx, 
the Framingham, Mass. 
based discount clothing 
store chain, will open its 
second Tidewater outlet 
at London Bridge Shop- 
ping Center, Virginia 
Beach... Bill's Carpet 
Warehouse, a Baltimore, 
Md. based rug and car- 
pet chain, opened its 
second location at Janaf 
Shopping Center, Nor- 
folk... Pic 'N Pay Skoc 
Stores, based in Por- 
tsmouth . ^ and 
Chesapeake. . .p% W^fiae 
f li IVfllhiia 



'^%<Wby 

Croc key ..jpender 
Tiieaters, lac. 



Election of Board of 
I>rectcs-s, Farm Hone 
Advisory Committee 
members, as well as opet- 
ations reports, will be 
among the highlights of 
the Southern States Coc^)- 
erative's annual member- 
ship meeting for Southern 
States Chesapeake Asso- 
ciation , v.b 2^ ai 
Indian Rivcr Junior High 
School. TTie meeting will 
be held at ■^:30 p.m. 

Theme of the meeting 
will be, "Cooperation- 
Strategy for* Success." 
Robert Vaughan of Vir- 
ginia Beach will serve as 
chairman of the local 



meeting. 

George Lampley of 
Richmtmd, a member of 
the Southern States 
Cooperative's regional 
staff, will report on Sou- 
thern States supply and 
marketing operations fw 
the 1981-82 fiscal year. 
This report will also 
include a slide/tape pre- 
sentation entitled "Co- 
operation—Strategy for 
Success." 

Local (^rations and 
services rendered to agri- 
culture in the community 
will be discussed by man- 
ager, Qyde G. Gentress. 



Know Us? 




Mora Downs 
Presidents Club 



Vicky Gallager 
Presidents Club 




_^ Aripne Lindscy J{»niCirslwr 

)ollarCiub Million Dollar Club 

We congratulate each of our agents for 
their efforts during the last year. 
Hov^ever, v,e take great pride in the ex- 
ceptional accomplishtnents of the above 
agents whose diligence has led to the pin- 
nacle of success. 



<kMf tfWf* Hupplwi Cir. 

t37S.r 



499 3399 




REALTtM 



There will be a special 
recognition of local board 
and Farm Home Admi- 
sory Committee members 
who retire this year. 

Nominees for the local 
board are Vernon C. 
Unser, Robert L Vander- 
plbeg, Chesapeake; W. 
Harvey Gilbert, Sr., Gene 
Daniels, Virginia Bea J.. 

Farm Hone Advisay 
Committee nominees are: 
Mrs. James W. Ramsey, 
Mrs. Clemeth Wells, 
Chesapeake; Mrs. W. 
Harvey Qlbert, Sr., Mrs. 
Itobert P. Vaughan, Vir- 
ginia Beach. 



Another feature of the 
meeting will be a "Share- 
A-Craft" display arrang- 
ed by the FHAC Commit- 
tee. Members are being 
urged to bring handmade 
crafts for display. 

Committee chairmen 
assisting with the meeting 
are--Attendance, Tele- 
phone-Mrs. R. David 
Flanagan, Virginia Beach^ 
food-Mrs. Betty Mowe, 
Virginia Beach, Greeting, 
Ribbons- W.H. Turling- 
ton, Chesapeake, Deco- 
rating-Mrs. Jean H. Mar- 
shall, Chesapeake, Usher- 
ing-N. Pat Boyce, Suf- 
folk. 



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Virginia Beach Sun, February 16, 1983 9 



Vir3inia Beach Business & Real Estate News 



Your Home 
Should Reflect 
Your Needs 



A single-Cunily heme, 
condominium or rental 
unit-which type of house- 
hold is best? 

"Hie answer is they all 
are 'best'," said John 
Blumling of Goodman 
Segar Hogan. "The real 
question should be: 'What 
is best for each particular 
fiunily?" 

He noted that the type 
(tf household that is best 
for one family might very 
well be the worst possible 
choice for another. 
"Really, the funily's life- 
style and economic cir- 
cumstances go a long way 
toward determining what 
is best." 

Before deciding whe- 
ther to buy a detached, 
single-family home or 
condominium, or whether 
to rent, the fiunily ought 
to consider the following: 

Cost of either the 
single-family home or 
condominium. Often, a 
fiunily can get more total 
living space for their 
money in buying a condo- 
minium. 



How important a factor 
is privacy? A single- 
family home, surrounded 
by a plat of land and 
perhaps a fence, offers a 
good deal more privacy 
than a condo. 

WcHild the down pay- 
ment on either a single- 
family hone or a condo- 
minium put the family in 
precarious economic cir- 
cumstances? If so, per- 
haps buying a lower pric- 
ed h(»ne or condo would 
be best at least initially. 

Are you handy and 
unairaid to tackle minor 
repair jobs, or is the 
simple task of mowing a 
lawn a chore you'd rather 
not do? Maintenance abil- 
ities and the wilUnfoeii 
to perform these taiks 
could be the ultimate de- 
terminant for the fiunily: 
single-family home for tte 
able and willing, and a 
coido for others. 

"Whatever the choice, 
the Realtor can help you 
in your final decision," 
Blumling added. 



It's Coming 
Soon!!!! 





By ROGER PYLE 



A recent National 
Association of Home 
Builders article says, 
"While interest rates 
have declined, the real 
cost of money remains six 
percentage points above 
the rate of inflatirai. The 
rate cX home sales and 
new construction-though 
improved from a year 
earlier-are still far below 
levels required to meet 
the shelter needs of this 
country. 

We have just been 
through 3 years of the 
worst recession since WW 
II. With the decline in 
interest rates, a spark of 
economic recovery has 
been kindled. We still 
have a long way to go to 
reach prosperity and 
much can be done by the 
Federal government to 
encourage and enhance 
economic prosperity and 
good affordable housing 
for all Americans. 

First we must explode 
the myth that America is 
overhoused and that too 
much has gone into hous- 
ing investment. That 
myth-sometimes whisper- 
ed in high places-ignores 
the facts. Favorable tax 
benefits for housing is 
responsible for providing 
home ownership for 
millions of Americans-it 
gives the average working 
man and woman a stake 
and a sense of pride. Tlie 



Achieving 

•Genuine 

Prosperity 



very competitive housing 
industry is a driving force 
in leading the country out 
of recession and providing 
a large number of jobs. 

Second, we need to 
reduce Federal deficits. If 
the enormous deficits are 
not controlled-starting 
now interest rates will 
again sour off the chart. 

Third, we must lower 
interest rates. "As the 
economy catches its 
breath following three 
years of record high inter- 
est rates and tight money, 
it is vitally important that 
the Federal Reserve 
Board pursue a monetary 
policy that would permit a 
further decline in interest 
rates, giving both con- 
sumers and business 
access to affordable credit 
so desperately needed to 
turn the eccmany around. 
Any return to the m«ie- 
tarist policies of the past 
would choke off the eco- 
nomic recovery. 

A 1% decline in unem- 
ployment rate cuts the 
federal deficit by about 
$29 Billion. The housing 
industry contributes 
greatly to this-the fwe- 
cast 400,000 more housing 
starts in 1983 will create 
700,000 new jobs. 

If we can do these 
things nowf I teUeve that 
the housing industry and 
the naticm will not only 
recover, but achieve 
genuine prosperity. 





We're Number 1 
In Great Bridge 



Strvtai 



• ResidcBtial 

• Comnercial 
•Farau 

SpcdaiisU 

Smoc 19M 



m 

R{*lTOR 




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REALTORS® 



MILDRED B. RICARDO 
PRESIDENT 



351 Johnstown Road, Chesapeake, Va. 



• In the Heart of Great Bridge 



547-4555 



Rhodes Realty 

takes great pride 



in 



Congratulating 



our top agent 
for January 




Sheiri Myers 



tij 



Rhodes Realty, Ltd. 

IIP p mS.BattkfleUmvd.Clm, 



m4)4$2-477l 



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We Teach The Teachers 

When considering a Real Estate 
School, ask yourself, "Where did 
their instructors get their education?" 
The answer, most likely - through 
Surety. 

Everyone judges Real Estate schools 
on standards we set years ago. 
Today, these standards still apply. 
We offer license preparation in just 
sixty days, morning as well as evening 
da^M at a central location. But 
most importantly, 

WE OFFER RESULTS... 

85<9b of our students pass the State 

Exam on their first try and our 

Broker Candidates enjoy a 97% passing 

average! 

Come - join the winners. 

Surety, the standard 
of excellence 

Surety 

Real Estate School 

5737 Prin(%ss Anne Ro«l 
Virginia Beach, Va. , 23462 

499-2395 



"Unique" in ail of Tidewater, has been used to describe Loehmann's Plaza a( Thalia Wayside. 
Architects and designers for the project are Brundage-Kroskin and Associates and Merry Lane 
Lauder of G. L. Wilson, general contractor. S. L. Nusbaum and Company will be developing 
and leasing the properties which will open in the fall. / 




NISSAN VISITS VO-TECH CENTER 

Bobby G. Ramey (right), service training insttiictor for fiiaum Motor Corporation in Portsmoutli, 
shows Franit Sutton the motor and automotive parts the Nissan Corporation recently to the Viiiinia Beach 
Vocationai Technical Center. Sutton, an automobile mechanics instructor at Vo-Tech, will use the parts to 
help train his students. Looking on are Phillip A. Johncox, Nissan's technical services manager in Por- 
tsmouth, and Chuck Marzahn, service manager of Ubcrty Datsun in Virginia Beach. 

(Pholo by John Williams) 




dDE iTOWNE 



In LukjfMr 



OPENING THIS WEEK 

A Custom Townhouse Community in 

the Urban Tradition. We offer 

exceptional quality at 

pre-development prices. 



ffuaMCMi «»«i 



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DIRECTIONS Ext tfom Upr««way 
SouthC^tOlrH)tp«n()«nc*BtMl Contmu* 
to Ntw IndafwndVfK* turn rtgfti on 
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Kay Afdahi 
460-2770 



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Home 
460-1610 



Model 

490-2356 



REALTY DIMENSIONS INC 

ifii Q (£} 







141 Virginia Beach Blvd. West 

Norfolk. Virginia 23510 

Phone (804) 623-3831 

A DIVISION OF COLONIAL SERVICE CORPOtATION 



OAdantic Pafmanent Mcnigage Conqiany 

A Wholly Owned Subiidiary of Atlantic Permanent Federal 
Savings A Loan Association 

944 Independence Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 2345S 

(804)4^1376/2810 



^^8olonia4 




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A Dl VISiCm OF COLONIAL OB VICE CORKMUTION 

Virginia Be«:h Boulevard West 

Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

Phone (804) 623-3753 



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gency 



A (N ViSnN OF OXOMAL SaVKX CCNVORATION 

141 Virginia B«uA Blvd. W«t 

Nwfdk. Virginia 23510 

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NOW AVAILABLE station One 

^ 24th k Ocean Front 

:> , Virginia Beach, Virginia 




104 2-Romn Suites 



NEW CONSTRUCTION 



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CONDOMINIUM 

24th & Atlantic 
Finest In Virginia Beach 
Own your own Oceanfront suite, not time 

sharing . From '81,500, Exclusive sales 
by PYLE REALTY 460-1777. 

Sales Of fige: 42^3185»'^Eves.) Roger Pylc 

340-6441 

Brokers 

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WE ARE GETTING GCK3D RESULTS 

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Ian 



10 Virginia Beach Sun, February 16, 1983 



The Woman's View 



TEEN Magazine Content ^ 

Warren Semifinalist 



Les Images de la Femme 




Renee Warren of Ches- 
apeake, VA has been 
named a semifinalist in 
the 1983 '7E£iV Magazine 
Great Model Search, one 
of the naticxi's major 
hunts for new modeling 
talent. She will be featur- 
ed in 'TEEN'S March 
issue, receive a variety of 
beauty products from The 
Gllete Company and be- 
come eligible for selection 
as a contest "super" 
semifinalist, the next step 
in winning the competi- 
tion. 

'TEEN, America's most 
widely circulated maga- 

Fnr Antiques 



zine for young women 12 
and 19, has been instru- 
mental in the careers of 
many models and actress- 
es, including Bo Derek, 
Cheryl Tiegs and Cheryl 
Ladd. The winner of the 
1983 Great Model Search 
will appear on 'TEEN'S 
cover and win a one-year 
modeling contract frwn 
The Gillette Company, co- 
sponsor of the event. The 
winner will also receive a 
new Mazda GLC Sport 
automobile. 

The field of semifina- 
lists<'will be narrowed to 
16 "super" semifinalists 
from six geographic re- 
gions later this year by the 
contest's judges, inde- 
pendent modeling and 
beauty experts. Two fina- 
lists from each region~a 
total of 12-'will then be 
chosen to compete in the 
1983 Great Model Search 
pageant, to be held in the 
Los Mgeles area in late 
October. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Parents Without Partners Tidewater Chapter 166 

Parents Without Partners Tidewater Chapter 
166 is seeking new members among those parents 
who are single due to the death of, or divorced or 
legally separated from the spouse or never married 
and who are interested in broadening their scope 
of life. Custody and age are no barriers. 

An* introductory meeting will be held at 1 144 
Georgetown Road, Apt. 204 on Feb. 16, at 1983 at 
8 p.m. 

For further information, please call 855-7661 . 

Virginia Beach Senior Qtizens 
February Birthdays 

These, we are wishing belated greetings: 
Ist-Olive Ball, Agnese Gaetano, Rosa Hartley, 
Lcn-etta Brauckman, 2nd-Cora Pittman, 4th-Nicho- 
las Martucci, 5th-Genevera Wilkinson, 6th-Ann 
McCullough, 7th-Myra Mobley, 8th-Roy Floc- 
kerzi, Alice Hancock, lOth-Louise Abernathy, 
Jean Pillsbury, Kay Pipkin, Jean Umpervitch, 
nth- John Wickins, 12th-lil RobertsMi, 13th-Gcr- 
trude Grimstiead, Amelia Hammerick, Louis Van 
I^tten, Bessie Edwards, 14lh-Elizabeth Ethe- 
ridge, and 15th-Ethel Brock. 

Happy Birthday to the rest of you! 16th-MaWe 
Stwy, nth-Florence Willis, Louis Quackenbush, 
ISth-Marie Howerton, Alice Nfoble, Trudy Wil- 
Ijams, 19th-Mildren Kroeschner, Helen Wickins, 
Norma Handy, 20th-Marie Dornheckerrand 22Bd- 
Alta Lacey. (More next week) 




'Images Of The Lady' 

^^ . . . .. •■:__. !..„.:««, «f aittiniip manv nice oeoi 



61 Years Of Love 



Hoffman Galleries, 
Tidewater's old line an- 
tiquarians will soon be 
celebrating their 61st an- 
niversary. Founded in 
1922 by the present owner, 
Harry L. Hoffman in the 
old Ghent section, moved 
to its present location on 
Virginia Beach Blvd. in 
June of 1978. 

Harry's father was in 
the business and it was 
there that he became in- 
triqued with the history 
that goes hand and hand 
with the antiques and 
developed a strong love of 
antiques. 

He has and stiJi con- 
tinues to research antiques 
and it was this desire to 
find out about each an- 
tique that has made him 
one of the leading 
authorities in the area. He 
is known the world over 
and this was mainly due to 
his dealings with a lot of 
military people 

throughout the years. 

Hoffman Galleries has 
continued to be one of the 
premier antique dealers in 
the Mid- Atlantic states. 
Mr. Hoffman states he 
has probably sold every 
important estate or private 



collections in the area. 
Additionally he was the 
<»iginal appraiser of all 
the artifacts in the MacAr- 
thur Memorial. This took 
over a year of work to ac- 
complish. He has also 
made appraisals for all the 
museums in the area. 



Hoffman Galleries 
holds their public auction 
on the first Saturday of 
every month. The Auc- 
tions start at precisely 10 
a.m. and contains a large 
selection of estate proper- 
ties. 




Our 

\elt 
Thanks To 

Nora 
Davenport 

for the 

Delicious 

Cake! 

(WeALLtnjoytdit!) 



Back in November of 
1982, Billie Lineberry, 
along with , her daughter 
Julie Horton, opened a 
very unique shop for 
ladies. 

Les Images de la Femme 
is a specialty shop, 
designed with the total 
woman in mind. Once 
translated, the name of 
their shop means "Images 
Of The Lady". 

"One person has a lot 
of images, Mrs. Lineberry 
said, "and we believe a 
woman can create dif- 
ferent images of herself 
through clothing. A lady 
may come into our shop, 
see a dress, state how pret- 
ty it is, but will say, it's 
not for me though. We're 
here to help change that 
thinking" Mrs. Lineberry 
continued. "The changes 
of ones images comes 
from experimenting with 
different clothing". "We 
carry one blouse, for in- 
stance, that is very basic in 
design and can go from a 
business suit to evening 
wear, and looks well in 
each instance." 

Billie and Julie travel to 
Atlanta, New York and 
Los Angeles to get the 
very best in designs for 
their customers. Very 
shortly, a trip to Dallas 
for another showing is 
planned. 

Among their designer 
labels you will see such 
names as Sarah Arazona, 
Patti Cappalli, Eugenia, 
Carol Warren, and their 
latest addition, "Snow 
Leopard", a designer out 
of California. This is, to 
Mrs. Lineberry's 



knowledge, the first 
designs of this person to 
be out. Also, Kirky-Y, a 
label brand new to this 
area is among their many 
originals. 

Their clothing is 
designed for the woman 
who is intriged by in- 
teresting and sophicated 
designs: those that they 
can not find in other 
stores and shops around 
the area. 

The range of sizes is 
fantastic, and truly must 
be a one-of-a-kind around 
Tidewater; sizes 2 to 16. 

Moderate prices too are 
at Les Images. From basic 
cotton knit tops, skirts 
and dresses ta Carol 
Warren's velvateen suits. 
These suits, with quilted 
jackets and linings, are 
exquisite in color, are new 
to this area, and are on 
sale at this time. 

Accessories, jewelry. 



reproductions of antique 
jewelry, are all moderately 
priced. Lace Jabots can 
also be found. The Jabot 
is actually a lace necklace 
to dress up any type of 
blouse. It makes a basic 
blouse into an evening 
outfit just by putting the 
jabot on. By adding a pen 
or other accessory, if you 
like, you are ready for an 
evening out. 

A customer's file is 
kept, and when Billie or 
Julie go to a show, they 
are prepared to search for 
a certain item of clothing 
if their customers so 
desire. 

Mrs. Lineberry and 
Julie did not plan for this 
shop, it just evolved - into 
a learning experience for 
both of them. 

The shop is located in a 
small neighborhood, with 
a very pleasing at- 
mosphere. They meet 



many nice people ~ some 
come to browse and say 
hello, while some become 
regular customers. j 

Both Mrs. Linebory and j 
Mrs. Horton are from the j 
Tidewater area;. Julie liv« 
in Chesapeake, and her 
degree in art is a very irar- 
portant asset to the 
business. 

Les Images de la Fenune 
is located in Ghent at 1513 
CoUey Ave., next to the 
Naro Theatre and Swert 
Shoppe. You are invited 
to come visit, browse and 
enjoy the many design* I 
they have to show. | 

At this time a Cruise j 
and Resort line is available! 
for your insp«;tion; and! 
with the wintery winds we! 
have had lately, a trip tQ; 
their intimate and spedalj 
shop, and a look at the! 
cruise fashions, should bel 
very uplifting. J 




^^U'l^^ 




& 

CASUAL WEAR 



^« 


.T Special 


a 


i^^g^. Discount 


•5 


^ Chesapeake Chimney 


^ 


Sweeps And General Repair 


^ 


482-1179 




If yoM have bM* paMtag off havlM 






yo«r cMaacy dcMcd became of the coal 






or otter rcMOM, yon doa't have lo wail 






aay hMier. 1 kaow thai liaMi are bani 






aad we wW do wbal we caa lo help you 






eaae the bwdea. CUauey Flm caa be 






wry fcuMOM lo yow booM aad faadly. 






We wM daaa aay oae or two ilory cUn- 






aey far the low coil of '25. There wU be a 






•S S«vfcc Charge lo paU oat yoar wood 






Have bMart aad rei^Me It. This is a 






iarftad offer. So Doat M^l If yoa have 






aay ipri^ patoOiv V carpcatry work 




mmmm 


thai wM aecd doii«. we caa #ve yoa a 
frteertaule. 




i^ltt 


^BT 


B«A Stewart Slate Reg. 'OlSOM 


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hs^ 


leffStawart Boadad 


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STORi 



' SALE 

1 5% r. 50% 
Off SELEa ITEMS 



• « SH>RTS • ROSSIGNOL 

• HiAD • OUN 

• N(»DICA • (KU 

M-4WV OJHEn STOREMOe 
Sf^CIALS 



Ski Roman 



S369 Va. BMCh Blvd. 




What's 
cooking 

at The Circle? 



LIVE MAINE 
LOBSTER 



r* NEW YORK 
SIRLOIN STEAl^ 



14 



95 



10 



95 



499-4533 



/»3 ColleuAH.. 
^^'X^U due om.q 



& 




ufuc 




Firm & Fitness 

Chesapeake's Newest Exercise 

Salon For Women 

Is now taking registrations. 

Special Grand Opening 
Ratas Are Available ""^ 

Through February For AH 
MomboriMps. 

482-5254 

• Exeixise Equipment 

• Scheduled Team Exercise 

• Unlimited Visits 
912 S. Battlefield Boulevard 

Chesapeake, Virginia 




l'/2 lb. stuffed with jumbo 
crab meat 

EARLY-BIRD 

• Sauteed Chicken 
Livers *5" 

• Fried or Broiled 
Trout *5" 



The best quality steak 
in Tidewater 



SPECIALS ■ 

• One Large 
Crab Cake 

• Fried Scallops 



»5" 

»5" 



LUNCHEON S'llO Tu«day- Saturday 

BUFFET *^ 

NIGHTLY 
ENTERTAINMENT 

Ray Brown At The Piano 



' \ 



r. ) 




FallMttltServ^ 
t:MtH.-2Ui. 



WINTER SALE 
ON 

Aziec 

radiant picture heaters 

will heat you and ' 
a cold room too! . 




Get the most 

comfortable 

heat since the sun from Aztec heaten 

that are safe to touch and cost only 

pennies an hour to operate. 




mi' 

SEAFOOD RISTAUMANT 



Tnc^tkra^tantay 
CteacdMoMtaiy 



3010 HIGH STREET 
PORTSMOUTll 




6t2 Wharl Scene bOO watts. 4 6 ampt 

Why heal a whdte house to \wami one pereon? Vail our 
gaHery ct «iergy eftoeni pcfure. portable and boH 
msi expenence Aztecs sc^, gentte viwntfh. WHi 




New Energy Window SystSMS, hi|i 



121 tAniEHflD KMlEVAtD % CHtSAKAKt, VA. }331t 
M40Nt H04I 412 S464 



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"3^1191 



inpvapMRiwi 



Virginia Beach Sun, February 16. 1983 1 1 



T 




The Woman's View 



t 



Chopping 
Block 

ByPATBEASLEY 

J 



If there's one thing I'm interested in, it's saving 
time in the kitchen; while at the same time, I'm 
eating 'good'. 

Here's a recipe I ran across that sounds 'delish' , 
and can be 'Created' in no time at all. 

Who's to know that we didn't 'slave' over a hot 
stove all day? 

I won't tell if you won't! 

HEAVENLY LAYER CAKE 

1 loaf (lOH oz.) frozen pound cake ^ 
1 Can (21 oz.) Comstock cherry, apple or 
blueberry pie filling. 
1 carton (8 oz.) frozen whipped topping, thawed. 
Chopped nuts or grated chocolate (optional) 
Cut frozen cake into 4 equal lengthwise slices. 
Place one slice on serving plate and spread with 
about ■/} can of pie filling, reserving some fruit for 
garnish, if desired. Continue layering, ending with 
cake layer. 

Frost sides and top of cake with whipped top- 
ping. Garnish with reserved fruit, nuts, and/or 
chocolate as desired. Cake cuts better if chilled 2-3 
hours before serving. Serves 6-8 (Depoidini on how 
big an eater you are! ! !) 

Now, doesn't that sound easy? If you remonber 
to keep these few ingredients in the freezer and on 
the pantry shelf, what a quick dessert to put 
together at the last minute. Try it, and Enjoy! 




The 

Hint 

Man 

By CHUCK FAULKNER 

I 



CUmaeys, Cleaning - To 
help clean your chimney, 
put a piwe of zinc on the 
hot coals. 

Or throw a handful of salt 
on the wood from time to 
time to cut the smoke in 
half. 

Chimney Soot - Chimney 
soot is an excellent fer- 
tilizer, so don't throw it 
away. Scatter it in your 
garden soil or mix it with 
your indoor plant soil. 
China Dishes, Repairing 
Cracks • Put the cracked 
dish in one quart of cold 
fresh milk to which you've 
added three tablespoons 
of white sugar, then bring 
slowly to a boil. Continue 
to slowly boil for one 
hour. Allow the china to 
cool in the milk. Most 
small cracks will disap- 
pear. 

Chlvn, Preserving - Fresh 
chives will keep for weeks 



if you wrap the green end 
of the chives in wax paper 
and keep them in the 
refrigerator. 

Chrome, Cleaniag - 
Moisten a soft cloth with 
kerosene and rub briskly. 
Polish with a second piece 
of soft cloth. 
Cold Remedy, Making 
Yonr Own - Mix together 
two tablespoons of finely 
powdered resin, four 
tablespoons of white 
sugar, and the whites of 
two eggs in one quart of 
good American whiskey. 
Take a tablespoon three 
times a day, preferably 
just before a meal. 

Note: This remedy is 
also good for a weak back 
or an irritating cough. 

Chuck Faulkner is brought to 
you through the courtesy of The 
Donning Company, a local 
publishing rirm, and Chuck 
Faulkner. The book is available 
in most book stores. 




The 

Uprooted 

Gourmet 

By J. ROBERT PERSON 

I 




f Dear Editor: 

f I just wanted to let someone know that "The Hint Man, Mr, Faulkner, saved me the 

replacement cost of a carpet with his carpet cleaning tips, and I am a senior citizen on a 

fixed income, so I really appreciate it. 

Thanks 
Mildred E. Sullivan 



Pork and poultry dishes are particularly craved for 
during this time of year and into the spring. Many times 
they can be complimented by the same garnishes and 
classic sauces, based on the meat. These recipes, you 
will find, will set well in your cooking flares as it hits the 
air. 

Pork Tenderloin and Mushrooms 

Pork Tenderloin 1 '/2 lb. 

VegeUble Oil 3 tbsp. 

Lemon Juice 1 tbsp. 

Black Pepper Pinch 

Garlic Clove 1 each 

Mushrooms '/2 lb. 

Onions, chopped fine 1 each 

Butter 4 tbsp. 

Sherry, Dry '..... 2 tbsp. 

Heavy Cream 2 tbsp. 

Cut pork tenderloin into I inch thick pieces. Pound 
them flat between two pieces of wax paper, using a tiat 
object or a rolling pin. Lay them in a shallow dish to be 
marinated. To make marinade. Pour oil and lemcMi 
juices into a bowl. Add pepper to taste. Crush garlic 
clove and mix with ml & lemon juice. Spoon this over 
pork tenderloin slices. Allow to marinate for 30 
minutes. In a skillet, heat butter, over medium heat 
until melted. Saute finely chopped onions in the butter 
until lightly brown. Add mushrooms (which you have 
sliced) to the onicxis also. Cook another 5 minutes. 
Remove the vegetables from the pan. Take the pork 
tcndcrldn slices from the marinade and saute them in 
the butter, on each side until dcwie. Remove them from 
pan onto a plate. Add sherry into the skillet and cook 
until reduced. Add vegetables back into pan also, 
stiring up all the juices. SeasOT with salt and pepoer 
Stir in the heavy cream, heatjng gently until bubbly. 
Remove from heat and pour over pork slices. Garnish 
with freshly chopped parsley. This is an excellent dish 
if served over rice. 

1 bid you a good day frcrni the Uprooted Gourmet. 




As Kitty Kallen ttsed to 
sing to us in the fifties. . . . 

March 28. 1980 

If you count sheep in 
order to tall asleep at 
night, you might be in- 
terested in the results of a 
scientific study I've recen- 
tly run across. 

It's not the green 
pastures and serene 
animals that do the trick. 

A research team at Har- 
vard has discovered that 
visualizing sheep prevents 
the brain's right hemis- 
sphere from processing 
anxiety-provokii^ imager\', 
while counting them keeps 
the left hemisphere from 
straying into problematic 
auditory and verbal 
thought. 

I think I understand 
that, some of it; and if I 
do, it follows that we'd be 
as well off counting 
whales. 

It's interesting to know 
that sheep counting has 
value for scientific 
reasons, but it sure takes 
the charm out of it. 

September 12, 1980 

While we're on the sub- 
ject of birthdays, I guess 
it's probably no news, by 




BevFulk 

Announces • 
The Opening Of 

B. B. Fulk 

Optical Company 



5847-B Poplar Hall Drive 

Norfolk, Virginia, 23502 
(Beside Military Circle - Across From Leggetts) 

Phone 461-3515 



I^ Optician Ray-Ban Magniflen 
Sunglasses 



(EnUmial #ii0e Sepair 

6220 Indian River Road 
Virginia Beach, Va., 23464 

Phone 420-9206 




r»3Tob"5FFT"i^oooFF"! 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



WHOLE OR 
HALF SOLES 
AND HEELS 

(Unll 1 Pair) 
WMiCoiiiKm 

EMkaMw.31. 1«U 



LADIES' 
HEEL LIFTS 

(UmiiaPain) 

WithCiNilMHI 

EMimMw. 31. IM3 



INTRODUCING 

NEW LANDSCAPING 
SERVICE 

'^SEASONS And REASONS''. 



{ 




SPECIAL 
DISCOUNT 
WITH THIS 
AD 



%nm 



w^ 







Sterling Florist 

And Greenhouses 

1752 Virginia Beach Boulevard 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 23454 
Chris Sterling 422-2501 



Specialists 
in 

Manicures • Pedicures 

For Men & Women 

Try Us 

Barbara Niles 
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Total 

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PROCLAIMS 
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ON 

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14 K Gold 

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Professional 
Perms 

42.95.P 



Midcity Sliopping Center 
399-8881 




Open 9-6 Daily 
9-9 Thursday 

Precision 
Haircuts 

»5.45 



873 S. Lynnhaven PItwy. 
468-6366 



iA:^ccial ordered) 

Greenbrier Mall 

Clfiapfafce 

420-3932 
Vi^nla Beach 

MIHINepWcst 

425-0440 



5118 V. Beach Blvd. 
497-9769 

6507 Auburn Drive 
420-6069 



539-Hiiitop Plaza 
428-9897 

4801-E Shore Drive 
460-3233 



1734 E. Little Creeii Road 
588-9093 

No Appointments - Come In At Your 

CoovenieiKe 

Also 3 salons In Newport News and 

Hampton 



My • 
Friends 

ByJIMKINCAlO 



this time of day, that 
today is the 100th anniver- 
sary of the birth of H. L. 
Mencken. 

Most of us who write 
for a living have noticed; 
and most of us have 
wished that we might be 
able to do what Mencken 
did so well— that is, com- 
ment on the world, where 
it's been and where it's 
likely to go, and with 
enough wit and humor to 
make, the news bearable. 

H^ L. Mencken was a 
hard man to like, and he 
intended to be; and he 
brought a great deal of ar- 
tistic energy to the 
business of making us see 
ourselves as others see us. 

I can read Mencken and 
And something 1 wish I'd 
written in almost every 
line. But I i link my 
favorite was his defmition 
of conscience. 

Conscience, he said, is 
the inner voice that warns 
us somebody may be 
looking. 

This jeries of excerpts from 
"Notes To My Friends" is 
brought to you through the cour- 
tesy of The Donning Company, a 

local publishing firm, and Jim 
Kincaid. The book is available in 
most book stores. 




Lir 
Williamsburg 



^ 



446 Newtown Rd., Virginia Beach 
490-2230 

• Large sctcclion sllh flowcn, 39C • 69< per ilem 

• Large bag - Glycerin treated baMc* brcatk '7.99 

• OasI*, t9< per brick 

• Dccoraicd or nndccoralcd broonH, fan, 
wooded KiMon 

• in slock centerpiccei • depending on die, '10. lo 
•25. each. 

• Cenlerplccct made lo order • Bring year own. 
vaM and tave. 

• Bridai or wedding bomineU, '10. lo '25. 
deprndlng on ifae. 

• Conagc* • ringic, '2.50, DonMc. '4.5t. 

Hoara: Monday - Friday 10-9, Satarday 10-6 

All AmmgeituHU, * Etc. ArtMmk With 
I WuhabltSUkFlowtrM 

FLORAL CLASSES, *SMA SUPPLIES 
BRING IN THIS AD & SAVE ANOTHER 10% 





^/'^: 



Franchiaed >~ Dance Studio 



Dandng. 

Colthesp4fii Laugh and ha»e 
some smiles again Loosen 
up and dance the night away 
Slop being a watchef and Mep out 
info the lun 

It Will Cheer 

\buUp,LiftYMiUp.And 

Put Smiles Of Fun fn Ibur 

Ufe. 




>bu can do U at Arthur Muf ray s 
The leading dance msirwHofs can 
mane you a supertj dancer with 
potse af>d new confidence 

8 Sessions For 

no.'' 



Learning lo dance a easy and tun 
with the proven Arthur Murray s 
method Meeting ne* people and 
gomg out is a part ot the denetrts a 
good darjctng partner gets Tate 
»j#lw* s*p call tor ies»ns today 



HusHe • Swmg n Slow Dance I 
ChaCha ■ Fox Trot • BunOa 
n Country • Others 



_ 1P.M. to 10 P.M. 

467-4747 



740 Timberiake Shopping Ctr. 
HoUand Road & S. PlaM Trail 

Vii^nia Beach 



L_ 



^mr^mfm 



^^^^^wiML » wijiiij^i-^, J— ^pjpiiipiipiiiii mn^^m^sm^K'm^^mimifimrmm^mfmmm^mt 



up 



12 Virginia Beach Sun, February 16, 198 3 

th* Church 
Is Th* P«epk 



Church Hews 



Tli«P«opl« 
Ar* Th« Church 



And, The Vision Became 'The Barn" 



Trinity Tabernacle, bet- 
ter Icnown as "The Barn," 
is, according to it's Pas- 
tor, the Rev. Jcrfin Carra- 
way, "a Twentieth Cen- 
tury Miracle." "We came 
to "The Barn" seven 
years ago this past New 
Years Eve with nineteen 
people and ten thousand 
dollars. After having ieas- 
ed-the building for one 
year at two thousand dd- 
lars a month (with an 
option toTjuy at the end of 
the first year fw eighty 
thousand dollars down), 
praise God, with His help, 
we were able to raise the 
down payment and buy 
"The Barn" at the end of 
the first year." 

"After three years in 
"The Barn" we even had 
to add an ^xtra morning 
service to acccnnmodate 
th^ over- flow crowds at 
the eleven o'clock ser- 
vice," he stated. 



When asked how he 
would describe the Trinity 
Tabernacle, "Brother" 
John replied, "It's a place 
where ail races and people 
with varied religious 
backgrounds can join to- 
gether for wcM-ship and 
find real love... the people 
truly love each other, and 
the Bible says we are to 
weep with those who 
weep and rejoice with 
those who are rejoicing. 
Our peq)le practice that 
and they really care for 
each other." 

Great emphasis is put 
on the teaching of the 
Word of God and the 
manifestation of the 
Fruit and Qfts of the Hdly 
Spirit at Trinity Taber- 
nacle according to Rev. 
Car ra way, who also oper- 
ates a food and clothes 
closet for the needy (not 
just members). And, 
watch the Rev. Carraway 



light up with enthusiasm 
as he tells of a tremen- 
dous teen ministry of fifty 
to seventy five teenagers 
(in regular attendance). 
These ydung people make 
"The Barn" a very 
"exciting place to wor- 
ship" he says. 



At present the weekly 
schedule of church activi- 
ties are as follows: 
Sunday: 

Worship Services 
8:00 A.M.-1 1:00 A.M. 
7:30 P.M. 

Children's Church dur- 
ing all regular worship 
services 

Monday: 

Bible Study - 7:30 P.M. 

Wednesday: 

Mid-week 
Worship Services 
7:30 P.M. 




Tririly Tabcmde ~ "The 9mn" 
(Imcrdcnomlulloiial) 
6226 Providence Road, Virginia Beach - College 



Park 



CHURCH BULLETINS 



Thursday: 

Special Prayer Services 
, 7:30 P.M. 

Friday: 

Way Inn Coffee House 
8:00 P.M. 
With live artists per- 



Brother John... And His Calling 




Rev. John Carraway 

Pastor 
Trinity Tabernacle 



The Rev. John Carra- 
way, (H-iginator of the 
Christian Broadcasting 
Network's "I am an 
American" program, reci- 
pient of the National Soci- 
ety of Daughters of Amer- 
ican Revolution Medal of 
Honor and the Freedran 
Foundatims "Gecvge 
Washington Honor Medal 
Award" has as diverse a 
background as any 
preacher in Tidewater, 
\(x, the CcHnmonwealth of 
Virginia, for that matter). 

(PastCM^ of the Trinity 
Tabernacle in Virginia 



Beach and better known 
as "Brother" John to 
most folks, Rev. Carraway 
describes himself as the 
Arthur Godfrey of Gospel 
music and he attributes 
his success in radio 
(WXRI-FM, for 16 years) 
to the fact his program is 
''down to earth gospel" 
and a good mix of good 
listening contemporary 
religious music. 

Former disc jockey, de- 
tective on the Norfolk 
Police Youth Bureau and 
Boys Qub of America 



director, the Rev. Carra- 
way completed his minis- 
terial studies at South- 
eastern Bible College and 
Sanford University in 
Birmingham, Alabama. 
After ministering to con- 
gregations in Alabama 
and Virginia, he devoted 
six years to full time wcffk 
as religious director for 
WCMS radio. His Iwige- 
vity with the CBN, includ- 
ing WXRI-FM and 
WYAH-TV is second only 

tcJnhat of Pat Robertscm, 
the network president. 



f(»-ming each week. 

Saturday: 

Fellowship Breakfast 
7:30 P.M. 

The breakfast is free - 
and the public is in- 
vited. 



Rev. Carraway, his wife 
Margie and 13 year dd 
son John John reside in 
the Tidewater area. 

"Brother John" sums 
up his pastoral call like 
this, "I was saved, called 
to go preach, licensed to 
preach and preached my 
first sermon, all in less 
than one mcmth's time, 
and I wouldn't change a 
thing if I had it to do all 
over again. 



-ONE SOLITARY LIFE 

He was born in 
an obscure village, 

the child of 
a peasant woman. 

He worked in 
a carpenter shop 

anid wasan 

itinerant preacher. 

He never 

wrote a book. 

He never 

held an offlce. 

He did none 

of the things 

one usually associates 

with greatness. 

Nineteen centuries 

have come and gone, 

and today He is 

the central figure 

of the human race. 

All the armies 

that ever marched, 

all the navies 

that ever sailed, 

all the kings 
that ever reigned, 

put together 

have not affected 

the life of man 

on this earth 

as much as that 



-One Solitary life - 



South Norf«A Bapttet Church 

Jim & I come to Chesapeake on Feb. 19 on 
Saturday at 8 t>.m. 

Jim Custer and Jim Schmidt will be performing 
a broad range of musical and comedy styles for all 
age groups. 

Uplifting, moving and inspiring are just a few 
of the adjectives used to descirbe Jim &. I by 
famiUes who have experioiced their concert. 



Klafi Gnut iaplbt Chureh 

On Sunday February 13, 7 p.m. a fibn series 
featuring Joyce LandorTs "His Stubborn Love" 
will address such topics as: 

How to have a fulfilling marriage, overcoming 
grief and depression, surviving your suffering, 
does God answer prayer and help! I'm a parent. 



Indian River Baptist Church 

Men's Prayer Breakfast will be held on Feb. 27 
at 7:30 a.m. Call the church for reservations, 424- 
5700. 

Mother's Morning Out program held each 
Friday - 9 a.m. • 12 noon. 

Cost of this program is 'S.OO and mervations 
are necessary. Call by Thursday, 12 noon. 

A family fibs Mries, "God's Pattern For 
Living, dnling with the relationships, wives, 
husbands, children, parents, broken homes, 
(Uvorced and ronarried persons. 

Hie series will be Iwld on Sunday evenings at 
7:30 p.m. starting Feb. 6 and running through 
March. 13. 

A nursery will be provided. 



United ChuKh Of Tidewater 

Commence the Lenten Season with service at 
7:30 p.m. on Ash Wednesday, February 16. • 




TIME AND GOD 

// is no accident that men, the world over, have built 
clocks into the steeples of their churches. 

Reduce life to its simplest components and what have 
you? TIME and GOD. 

Times marks the beginning of life. It measures the 
growth of our bodies. It provides opportunity for our work 
and play. It reveals to us our human limitations, and then, 
one day, Time leaves us behind. ... 

But Cod is the origin of life. He measures the growth of 
our souls. He provides our strength and forgives our 
weakness. He reveals to us His Limitless Love. And, never 
deigning to leave us behind, God beckons us on-even 
bkyond the circle of time. 

A parable then: the clock in 
the steeple! 

Man finds material security 
and temporal happiness as he 
learns to respect Time. 

Man finds spiritual security 
and eternal happiness as he 
learns to love God! 



^^ PI 



v^^-^"..!?"^*-^. 



PROVIDENCE ROAD - VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA 



< 



<? 



Pastor: Rev. John R. Carraway 
Phone 424-2276 



Cedar Koad ^Aigmbi^ of yod 




916CED*nROA0 

GREAT BRflKlE 

CHESAPEAKE VIRGINIA 23320 

TELEPHONE M7 9SS1 or S4r 2233 



Momiag WoraWp 

(Janior Charek) It.M a.i 

EvanteHrtk Service . . . . 7.-W p.i 
Tucsdij' Ymi^ Adalb. . 7:3# p.i 
Wedaeaday FawUy NlglH7:30 p.i 



-- 


of&QrfMk 

" -^ Worship Scrvket 

SmMlay School 9:45 a.a. 

Morning Worship IIMa.M. 

Church Training 6:Mp.a. 

Evening Warship 7:00 p.m. 

Ken Hemphill, Pastor 

312 Kcaptviilc Road. NorfolK, Va.. m^ 4k\-*m 


Now Available 
For Rental 




Video Cassettes Include: 

•JaaeaDolMon •MUyGrakaai 
•LloydO^vIc •AmUcmI 

• Ivnet Ludorf • Hampty 

• DavM Man • Amy Gnwi 

For OMM* tafonBadon, taiqi^ at 

Longs Religious 
Supply . 

ttlt MMMicdto Ave.. Noffoft. Va. 
627-04S9 


p 

i 


UI/Hl/ 

1 




Word 
Home Video 





HThc 
Open Door (804)34o-iui 
Chapd 

3177 Va. Beach Blvd., Va. Beach, Va., 23452 

SUNDAY Tllf»>AY 

SudvScbool 9:ISAM MMeM^ IMOAM 

Wonii^S«r*kt M»Mt 

....1*:MAM wmNEaiAY 

fcJtWI Mid-««^Scf«tet....7Mm 







301 S. Ncwiown r3M 
^Norfolk, Va.,23S02 



461-5041 



SINDAY 

in KM. CbiMH 

lf;«A.M. C tkt i »UM Oft 

<>.■•( A.M. PilwfMfttrfm 



WEDNESDAY 

IM r.M. tmm MtM Ac«>M> 

DAILY 

l«f Vs.>ck. -P««>f. 



R L. Kay, Pastor Danny R. 'ThOTM&,Assoctate Pastor 



Kings Grant Baptist Church 

873 Little Neck Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

SUNDAY 

Morning Worship... g:00i.m. WEDNESDAY 

Svi^ay School 9:00 i.n. IbmII) Niglil Dtnacr. 6:00 p.i 

Snida^ School 10:00 a.m. Gr^cd ChiMren't 

Moralai Worship . . MM a.m. Ckoin 6:30 p.i 

Evcrii^ WonUp . . . 7.110 p.m. Prayer Service . . i-M p.i 

Jerry Holcomb, Pastor 
340-0902 



CALVARY 

ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

4925 Providence Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Leonard Campbell, Pastor 

495-1004 
Youth L.I.F.E. Saturday, 7 P.M. 




imwmiknm m udenmtbts 

m74l^ilMILrCM(IICM 

mouMmytR 

BAPTIST CHUIiCH 

1900 LmmlAvmm 

Clmtap9ak %, Va., 23325 

Phate W. McSwain, Jr. Pastor 

424-5700 



^rw* 



mmmm^ 



^mimtmmm 



■*■ W ■ 



Virginia Beach Sun, February 16, 1983 1 3 






Guide To Virginia Beach 



iaued 






Yesterdays' 

— ^ — T'reasures 
T'odays' 

Handicrafts, 
"^oniorrows' - 

HeirJooms 



T^» 








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CABBAWAY HOlfSE I S 
CIUCA 1734 I >• 



Carraway House 

317 S.Witchduck Road 

A delight/"! trip into the 
past with 18th century 
reproductions and antiques. 
We carry something for 
everyone from Slieff 
Pewter and Baldwin Brass , 
to beautiful Madison I 
Square furniture. Alsol 
country items like candles.\ 
folk art, primitive pain- 
tings, etc... gift items of a\ 
wide variety. Hours 10 til 5 
daily. I til 5 Sun. Closed 
Wed. 
1901 






"Iff K 



© 









'Oa</l 



If-^/. 



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^•^j 



(01 



r J^'. A*^'^<r T^'-if *•» 

Co// *^ „ ". c- ^"ctaS. 



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C&>2>. 



Hii 




^^-^>£n 



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Engl-"" ur.ia"« ocl 
chef'- .sorfwa" »* 




■jl^tOn^^NJ^^ 



Jl"'^ '^oi:'^- r^^'^ oU 



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® 



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VA. 



^// 



Jordan's Country 



ck^" 



kf'8' 



Iters, 



'>565 





^=* 



of Salem R<»<» 
^aind Recreation Dnve 



Corner I 



. >-k 



,h^e you will find « 
°^'ZlZion of folk 

4H-3a» 




®i 



■.<• •Jiii 




»%*, '^*'/«„. "*"■"»» /^^> 




\m 



Hoffman Galleries 
Comer Cottage 



3. Jordan 's Country Shop 

4. Countryside Shops 



The Lady PeddUr 
Mountain Crafts 



7. Grandma *s A ttic. Inc. 
$. Carraway Hmtu 



iiliii 



■IlillllMiiiil 



■iii 



'•mi^mmm^ 



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14 Virginia Beach Sun, February 16. 1983 



1 • ^ . 

Virsinia Beach Sun Hews 




Thomas Almberg (r), of First Colonial and Larry Basset of Green Run. 



P.A. Wins Tournament 



Oefeading chanpioB Princess Anne High 
^hod weo the annaal Beach District wrestling 
tournament held over the weekend at Green Run 
High School. 

Competing were 70 wrestlers in 11 weight 
classes from each of the city's seven high schools. 
Kempsville High School came in second place, 
foHowed hy First Colonial, Cox, Kellam, Green 



Run and Bayside. 

In first round action, Ijury Basset of Green 
Run, above, gets the best <rf First Colonial's 
Ibomas Almberg in the 112-ponnd division. 
Basset went on to lose in the semi- 
finals to Brandon Slate of Princess Anne. 
Almberg, in a flrat-round consdation match, 
defeated Roger Garrison of Princess Anne. 



If I Was Mayor 

'Fix The Boulevard' 



"That Virginia Beach Boulevard is really 
something." complains Virginia Beach resident 
Cynthia Lee Sards, a sales representative for a 
local wine distributor. "If I was mayor, I'd sure 
do something to fix it. " 

Sarris, a native of Manassas Park, Va., and a 
recent graduate of Old Dominion University, says 
the nuuosr difficulty on the boulevard is traffic- 
congestion. "I'm on the road all the time because 
of my job, and I get so frustrated sometimes sit- 
ting and waiting for the lights to change. Then, 
when I finally reach the light, it turns red on me." 

Informed that a computer-controlled traffic 
signal system is already in the process of being in- 
stalled along the throughfare, Sarris applauded. 
"It's about time," she said. "From what 1 under- 
stand, people have been battling that road for an 
awful long time." 

Sarris suggested the possibility of expanding the 
street by four lanes, "Maybe if they did that, 
along with controljling the lights with a computer, 
maybe then traffic on that road would run a little 
more smoothly." 

Time, Sarris concluded, is of the essence. "The 
mayor or the city council or whoever it is that is in 
charge of such things ought to get to work on this 




Sarris 

problem right now," she said. "It has already 
been far too long, and I think it is ridiculous that 
Virginia Beach citizens, given all the money they 
spend on this city, should have to have such a 
lousy road." 



\\ 



T! I 



Fdlowing are seme of the criminal activitiel 
reported over the weekend in each of the city's 
police precincts. 

First PrcdBct, covering 

Blackwatcr, Pmgo, Princess Anne 

and KerapsviOe borooghs. 

Capt. M.E. Beane fai command. 

I "It was a fcirly busy weekend," said Beane. 
"In ladlMi lakes, we \aA two cases of destruction 
of property. In aie, Ui«e was a convertible top 
that was sUced up. and in the other one, we had a 
screen cut in a patio enclosure. In Cedar Ridge, a 
I rock was thrown through a window. In West View, 
ia rock brdce through a storm door. In Margie 
HoUow, sortie people went into a house under 
construction, destroyed some plumbing fixtures 
and tore loose some wiring. In Pine Needles, 
someone broke the rear window on an automobile. 

"In nearly every case, these incidents occured 
on Friday and Saturday nights between 9 p.m. 
and 2 a.m.," Beane noted. 

In addition, Beane reported three residential 
burglaries, in SadMdfc, Windsor Woods and 
BeHamy Afaaor. Also, Beane said, many of his 
personnel were involved in traf&: control because 
of flooding cX roads last week. 

Secoad Preset, covcrtag 
eastern half oTI^aahavca, aad 
VlrgiBlB Beach boroagks. 
CaptalaW.W. later hi< 



"We had a busy one this weekend," said 
Baker. Arno^ the crimes reported by Baker 
were: 

•A conunerciid burglary n the Zayre store in 
the HiUtop S^aart Plata. The inddent owurcd on 
Friday, Feb. II. Stden was an Mmn vkfao game 
and a television set. 

•A burglary A the VhgiaiB W*mk Cwaalty 
Chapd in the 1200 bkKk of LaaUa Road. "It wai 
a safe job," said iaker, who was un-.urc f>f h<m 
much moiKy was ^^^oi. 

•Ten lar<^iies ttom tutOTKMiet. "Mottry wtiai 
they got were radio jMTtt am) C.B.'*," wid Baker 



•Four residential burglaries. 
•Three DUI arrests. 

Third Precinct, covering 

Bayside and western half 

of Lynnhaven boroughs. 

Captain A. E. Smith in command. 

/'~ \ 

Accc^ding to Lt. H.J. Coeffield, the following 

incidents were investigated by Third Ih-ecinct 

officers: 

•Breaking and entering at Independence Jimior 
High Schod ui the 1300 block of Dunstan lane on 
Sunday, Feb. 13 during the day. Pdice are 
looking fOT three white male suspects, approxi- 
mately IS years dd, who were observed leaving 
the scene on Beach Qruiser bicycles. Tbey are 
wanted for vandalism. 

•Commercial burglaries at the 200 block of 
Nwth Witch Duck Road, and in the 4300 block of 
Shore Drive. 

•Residential burglaries at the 600 block of 
Jobnsoa Street, the 4700 block aS Sullivan Blvd., 
the 700 block of Lawrence Drive, the S400 block of 
Shadowood Drive, and the 1100 block of Baker 
Road. 

t 
Unifoms Diilsioa Sapport tareaa, iacindlag 

SWAT opcnitioM, dvfl dtatarbaans, K-9 corps 

helicepter aad auurlac introte, crime preveatloa 

aad uHdysht. Ca^ida T. V. hrvfaig la conawad. 

"A fairly quiet weeland," said Lt. E.E. Rorrer. 
"About the biggest news we Nui was an accident 
involving a police car." 

Rorrer said the accicknt Uxk place at 1:0S a.m. 
on Monday, Feb. 14 DIaawd Spriag* Bnd Mar 
hngom Drive. A 1973 Plymouth driven by Frank 
Kelky cf Foruroouth was proceeding north- 
bound in the southbound lane when he stn^k a 
parked Virginw Beach pdice au. driven by Sgt. 
R.J. Zeltman of the Third l^ecinct. Both vehicles 
were totaled. Zeltmaa was taken to Bayside 
Hospital, where he it m stable condition. Kelky 
wu transported by the rescue hclKopter Nghtin- 
gale U} Norfolk Oeaeral Hospital, where he is 
Usi«d M scruitf 



I Accused Drunken Driver Hits Police Car Head-On 



How To Grow Month To Month 



Sun 
Flower 



BjrGr^LowifWi 
■•Mh Esteaiimi AiMt 




Herbaceous perennials are a category of plants 
whose above ground parts die each winter, but regrow 
each year in Virginia Beach from their hardy roots. 
Ifcrbaceous perennials exist in so many different 
shapes, sizes colors, and have so many uses that it 
would take a book to give complete descriptions and 
care instructions for each variety. 

Perennials, like annuals, give color to the garden in a 
shady spot and in op«;n sun. With prc^r selection, 
perennials, unlike annuals, can give color throughout 
the year and keep performing year after year. 

Since pereiuiials will not flower unless exposed to low 
temperature for a number of weeks ox to long or short 
days or a combination of these factors, their flowering 
time is predictable. Once the flowering dates are 
established, one only has to select a flower for each 
month to have year round flowers in the landscape. 

The following list, beginning with January bloomers, 
represents only a small fraction of the perennials 
available on the market today. 

January may seem a drab mcmth for most people. 
Cold temperatures and even snow would seem to keep 
any plant dwmant, but not Christmas rose. Helleborus 
or Qiristmas rose must be grown from seed and 
requires a mdst, shady locaticxi. It will even push its 
bloom up through snow to give you color when you least 
expect it. 

The mcHith of February marks the time iat 
Snowdrops and Winter Aconite. Both like rich, well 
drained soil and do best in shady areas. Like all 
early-flowering small bulbs hundreds are needed to 
make a show. 

March is bulb mcMith in Virginia Beach, A long list of 
varieties, including crocus daffodils and Hyacinth can 
be used for color at this time. Unlike your February 
flowers, most all the March flowers require full sun. 
Bulbs planted in shady areas will bloom the flrst year, 
but only send up foliage the succeeding years. 



Continued from Page 6 



Agenda 



Dr. John Silverman, School of Business Administration, Old 
Dominion University, discussed "Beach Recreation Survey." 

i^ New Business 

P«V«lopM«llf 

Development of Independence and Buckner Boulevards was 
discussed. City Ni^^nager was instructed to prepare an ordinan- 
ce for Feb. 28^6eting. 



Establishment of Awards and Memorials Board was referred 
to the Virginia Beach Research and Advisory Council for 
study. 



Residents of King's Landing Circle and Green Pine Lane ex- 
expressed opposition to extension of King's Landing Circle to 
connect with Green Pine Lane. Referred to Public Works 
Department for review. 



Varianc* 



A request to expidite subdivisional variance in petition of 
Ronald S. Bray. Approved to expidite at hearing for Planning 
Commission April 12, and at City Council April 18. 
1 



Attorney Grover Wright's request to schedule for City 
Council agenda concerning 3S.S-acre parcel, Baylake Beach- 
Ocean Park area (Bayside Borough), R. G. Moore Construc- 
tion Corporation (Water Oaks) for March 7 City Council 
agenda. 



if Announcement 



The regular meeting scheduled for Monday, Feb. 21 has been 
cancelled in observance of George Washington's birthday. 



if Adjournment 



Council, by an 8-1 vote, recessed to executive session at 7:35 
p.m., R. Jones dissenting. Council adjourned at 8:30 p.m. 



Seniors' Save 

Sun Subscription Discount 
For Beach Senior Citizens 




Virginia Beach Sun subscriptions for 
Virginia Beach residents 60 years or older 
may be purchased for $6 for one year, or 
$9 for two years. A regular one-year sub- 
scription is $9; two years is $12. To sub- 
scribe to The Virginia Beach Sun. Virginia 
B^u;h's community newspaper for 57 
years, call 486-3430 or mail check to The 
Virginia Beach Sun, 138 S. Rosemont 
Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 



April rivals March for color when bulbs are used. 
Tulips are hard to beat for color, but if placed in poorly 
drained soils, tend to rot away after three years. 
Non-bulb flowers for April include Bleeding Heart, Iris 
and Wallflower. 

May flowers include "Basket of Gold" Allysum, 
Oxalis, Qjlumbine and Lily of the Valley. All prefer a 
good garden loam, but, depending on the variety 
selected, can be used in your shady «■ sunny locations. 

June marks the arrival of sununer. Competition from 
annuals can be stiff. However, Daylilies can equal any 
annual. Easter Lilies when grown outdoors will also 
bloom now and offer fragrance as well. 

July heat is great for gladiolus. These bulbs require a 
well drained soil and full sun. Periodic replanting will 
help insure a continued supply of this flower. Three 
years in the same untilled bed tends to cause poor 
performance with these plants. 

August is a time when many annuals suffer from the 
heat. Fortunately, August is the time for Hardy 
Amaryllis to bloOTi. These flowers hold true to their 
first name. Hardy, and will give you pleasure year after 
year with no hassels. 

September is marked with surprises. That is due to a 
flower called Lycoris. Lyccms puts out foliage in early 
spring to build up sugars. These leaves die in early 
summer and most people forget where the plants are. 
Then, literally in a matter of a day or two, foot high 
spikes appear which, in another day ot two, will support 
large and colorful flowers. Lycwis is another no-hassel 
performer. 

October and November mark the reign of the favorite 
of flower lovers - the Chrysanthemum. Through 
selecting early and late bloaners, the home gardener 
can have two full months of flowers. Cut all you want of 
this flower because you'll always leave an abundant 
supply behind. 

December provides a challenge to the flower 
gardener. Although no reliable December bloomers are 
on the market, some sporadic flowering can be seen. 
This month is best spent giving the herbaceous 
perennials the occassicmal care they need. Ftemove any 
dead stem and foliage and divide those plants which 
have grown to large crowded plants whose flowers are 
not as large or numerous as they should be can also be 
devided now. 

The above herbaceous perennials do well when 
mixed with annuals and evergreen perennials. Combin- 
ing all these with shrubs and trees will give you a 
landscape that lets you en^ working in the 
yard.— Lonergoa 




Crime Solvers Want Suspects 

The Virginia Beach Crime Solvers program is seeking 
information about the Jan., 19 armed robbery that oc- 
curred on Laskin Road at the HiUtop Plaza Shopping 
Center. 

Anyone with information about this or any other 
robbery can contact Crime Solvers at 427-000 and be 
eligible for a cash reward of up to $1 ,000 when an arrest 
is made. 



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Virginia Beach, Va., 23452 

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Vir3inia Beach Sun Hews 



Virginia Beach Sun, February 16. 1983 15 




Student Creative Writing 

ne^lmlnr^"* T^ *"^ '^"'^ by Princess An- 
M^ Elementary School. The principal is Pearl N, 

School Is... 

;^ 1 *°.'° '*^''°°' '° 'w™ so you can have a 

su£S.S^5 V *'''*'"«• '""'tiP'yins. adding, and 

Ske ITpI r "*" "fu ^° f"" things in school 
UM art, P.E.. music, and the library. 

thi&';'o;r*"^«"''"^°-"-*-"beon 

In my school we have homeroom and reading. 
The subjects m homeroom are Science SS 
social studies). Health, and Math. l7reading the 
subjects are spelling, and English. * 



School Is... 

School is educational and exciting. In school 
we get many privileges such as going to the library, 
and workmg on special projects. You use yow 
education and afl through your life. 

I try to get good grades so I can" get a good job 
when I get older. I warn to bJ an imerior 
decorator. Art will help me match designs and tex- 
tures together..Math will help me with geometric 
designs. All my subjects will help me become a 
successful interior decorator someday. 

Dtfto.. Chri.iiM b . ,i«tert I. Mn. McKlimey'. nittgrwl. 



, School Is 

School is a place to get ^n education. Nowadays 
you need an education.*. I think it is worth it 
because I would like to be a doctor or an architect 
someday. 

You can't even join the army if you don't 
graduate. If you want a scholarship or a good job 
School is the place to go! ' 

^Mctan Randall, 10, daQghter of Karen Randall. Mccaa ii a 
flnb grade student In Mn.McKlnney'i clan. 

Schoolls... 



School is a pla<x where you get your formal 
education. It is a plaw where students study sub- 
jects Uke math, soda! studies. English, spcUing, 
science and music. Right now, fifth grade student* 
are studying and learning about fractions, Lewis 
and Clwk, biisinns liters, the sounds oi and ow, 
volcanoes and music (wttems . 

Students are Uught by teachers who are 
specially trained for their jobs. There are other 
adults who help at school such as the principal, 
vice-principal, librarian, lunchroom workers, 
janitors, secretaries and the nurse. They all help in 
different ways to help students learn. 

Children in America finish elementary, junior 
high and high schools before they can get a high 
school diploma. Some students go on to study 
more in college or at other schools. 

The formal education you get at school teaches 
the basics skills including reading, writing and 
arithmetic. You can add to this formal education 
with the things you can learn about at home, on 
TV, on trips, at the movia, by reading books and 
magazines plus many other things you do outside 
of school. This is sometimes called an informal 
education. 

A good education is a very important thing. 
School is the best place to begin ! 

»y tUty Reed, 10, dangliter of Ronald and Patricia Reed. Bet- 
ty is a flflh grade stndeal in Mis. McKinncy'i claas. 

A Storm At Sea 

When a storm at sea appears 

Strange things happen. 

The sky gets dark 

Thunder crashes 

A finger of lightning 

Crosses the sky. 

The waves look like "^ 

They're topped with icing. * 

By Rhonda Mackenzie, 10, daughter of Thomas and Pamela 
Mackenzie. Rhonda is in JoAnn HarriMin's nfib grade dass. 



Storms At Sea 



When a storm at sea comes it gets dark, 

The wind blows. 

The rain falls. 

And the sea rumbles. 

Suddenly a white light streaks across the sky. 

Big drums pound 

As if they were wild. 

Soon you are lost at sea. 

By Rebecca Murray, 10, daughter of Michad aid Marilyi 
Murray. Bctoy b a student in Mrs. Hatrboa's Ofth grade ciatt. 



vl^SS^i^^^^^t^^Jl^'^^^i!^:^''''''*^^ "*^' co«pl.ttd tMMmpk, of iMmt ciwtive writing to ne 

^1 *?,*• ■"*■*«• *<»^> Vliltali ll«Kh, VA, 23452. For more inforanlioa call 4M-343e. DeadHne for each WcdMs£»'s 
•I Ii the fnday before. 



Who Reads The Sun? 
Mayor Jones Does! 




m 



A Year of 
Celebrations 



Vlf||i^ Bnch Mayw Loiite R. Jwms, reads a ropy of The Vurginia BokH Sun 
\, wUdkcreccivMweddyaltfecaMyM-'ioffkc. 



Objective, Timely 

Virginia Beach Mayor Louis R. Jones said he r^ads Virginia 
Beach's 57 year old community newspaper because, "it has an 
objective viewpoint about what's going on in Virginia Beach, and 
it brings information to the public in a timely fashion. " 

Why not join Mayor Jones and read The Sun? 

To subscribe to The Virginia Beach Sun call 486-3430 or write 
to The Virginia Beach Sun, 138 South Rosemont Road. Virginia 
Beach, Va. 23451. A one-year subscription, 52 issua, is only $9. 

If you care about Virginia Beach, read The Virginia Beach Sun. 



Beacher 
Honored 

A Virginia Beach 
resident has been named 
"Man of the Year" by the 
Norfolk District United 
Methodist Men (UMM). 
. The recipient of this 
award is Dan Townes, 
who has served as 
treasurer of the District 
UMM for 31 years. 
Townes is a member of the 
Virginia Beach United 
Methodist Oiurcfa. He has 
been selected by tiw 1,100- 
member organization, 
which has 40 chartered 
UnitMi Methodist Men's 
Fellowships within the 
Norfolk District (in- 
duding churches in Nor- 
folk, Virginia Beach and 
Chesapeake). 

The "Man of the Year 
Award" was presentni at 
the Twenty-first Annual 
I^nner of the Norfolk 
District UMM held recen- 
tly at Virginia Weleyan 
College. Over 480 persons 
attended the meeting 
where W. Kenneth Good- 
K>n, retired bishop of the 
Virgnia Conferemx, was 
the prioci|wl speaks. 

Other business included 
the announcement of the 
winner of the Albert L. 
White Tn^y, awarded to 
the Aldersgate United 
Methodist Men for the 
largest ctmtributicm ($77S) 
to a ichotarship hmA for 
VWC. TTm t<Mal amount 
(^tributed to tlw fund 
this year by the district 
(wganlzation was $4,746. 




Average Cost of Arson Fire Is $2,700 Each 



Continued from Page I 

65 of the 2,695 fires responded to by city 
firefighters, according to Mark Marchbank, 
assistant to Fire Chief Harry E. EHczel. Structural 
damages resulting from those arson cases totalled 
nearly $856,000, he said. 

Every time any of the city's 251 paid 
firefighters and 250 vdunteers are summoned tea 
fire, it costs an average of $2,700 in manpower 
hours and in use of equipment and supplies, 
acccM-ding to Marchbank. Some fires manage to 
take a bigger bite out of the fire department's $8.7 
million annual budget. The Ivanhoe fire, for 
example, cost the city around $4,300, Marchbank 
said. The Avalon fire cost $2,276, and the Yorgy's 
fire, $1,100. 

Hundley estimates that six arson cases have 
generated more than $25,000 in property damage 
since January. "Stmie of these arsons can cost $5 
million," he said. "A fire at First CdcHiial High 
School a few years ago caused more than $450,000 
in structural damages. 

"Also, there are the hidden costs," Hundley 
caitinued. "When businesses are ruined, there 
are lost jobs and income which cause lost tax 
revenues. Insurance premiums increase. Taxes 
' are mcreastd to pay for additional fire and pdice 
protection. Plus, it creates an eyesore. Look at the 
Ivanhoe. Who wants to come to the Beach for a 
vacation and have to look at that crap?" 

Also, there is the ever-present danger imperil- 
ing the lives of Beach firefighters. In 1979, 
Virginia Beach Fire Department Lt. Dickie Taylw 
was killed while battling a fire later determined to 
have been set by an arsonist. "I believe in taking 
a tough stance against arsonists," said Sciortino. 
"You are not only dealing with danger to other 
pec^lc's pr(^rty, there is also a danger to people 
and to the firemen. Tliis so-t of reckless behavior 
cannot be tderated." Said Hundley: "My hat is 
off to Sciortino for his views on arsonists. He is 
the best thing to ever happen to Virginia Beach." 
Oiffin Rogers, a five year firefighting veteran 
at company 11 at the oceanfi-ont, said he and his 
comrades have no fear of arson fires. "We get 
paid to do a jc^ and we do it," he said. Rogers, 
who helped extinguish both the Ivanhoe and the 
Avalon fires, said he is "disgusted" by arscmists. 
"I feel kind of sorry for them because they must 
be sick people," he said. "But Idcm't have a lot of 
sympathy for them because they can hurt us and 
innocent people." 

"This recent rash of arson is of great concern, 

there^'s no doubt about that," said Lt. Bill 

Thompson of Company 11. "These types of fires 

are certainly more dangerous* than accidental 

fires, and they place the lives of each and every 

one pf my men in danger. I pray it conies to an end 

real soon." Ihompspn said 21 firefighters split 

three, seven-man sjAfts around the clock at the 

station, located at 20th Street and Arctic Avenue. 

"Our job is dangerous enough," said Lt. 

Michael W. Wade, a fire investigator. "We don't 

need for our pecqjie to be set up by arsonists. But, 

a fireman knows when he takes the job of the 

many dangers imposed upon him. Arson just goes 

along with the territory." 

Anna Coovictioas Are Few 
b) his 15 years with the department, Hundley 
said he knows of just two arsonists who have ever 
been onvicted and gone to jail. Virginia Beach 
has four full-time fire investigators. In addition to 
Hundley and Wade, there are also investigators 
P.J. McAndrews and Billy Fulghum, Jr. They are 
sworn poUce officers who are certiied by the state 
Criminal Justices Servke Commission and the 
state Fire Services Training Canmissiai. Like 
tiiKlitional pdice officen, each carries a handgun. 
Hwy work with local, state and federal authorities 
U weD as with insurance comities. 

"We have literally hundreds of cases from 
years goiK by that remain unsdved," said 
Hmdley. "Whsr? Tliere are a number of reasons. 
Anon, typkally, is done at nighttime, therefore, 
there is a lack of witnesses. It's real hard to get 
any kind ctf conviction without witnesses. Second- 
ly, and this is our biggest obstacle, all fires are 
iv^umed by law to be accidental until proven 
otherwise. Tht burden for this proof falls on us." 
"I had one (x&t that I worked on for two and a 
half yean," said Wade. "The fire occurcd on Oct. 
12, 1^0, and it took all this time for me to get the 
bre^ I neetkd to finally ck»e this case. I ^t 
recemly was able to make the federal indictments. 
"Believe me." Wa<fc continwtd, "it's a really 
gnttifying experieiKX to work on something for so 



long and then to finally have it come to a 
conclusion. But, the battle is only half over now. 
An arrest is one thing, a convicticMi is another." 
Enter Paul Sciortino. The commonwealth's 
attorney said he has prosecuted "perhaps 40" 
arson cases in his 13 years with the city. In that 
time, he said, he has not sent one arson suspect to 
prison. 

"I've prosecuted some big ones and I've 
prosecuted some little CMies, and I've lost just 
about all of them," Sciortino conceded. "I've 
gotten convictions, but a lot of times 1 had to bar- 
gain for a confession in exchange for probation. 
My thinking is this: I'd rather have a conviction 
and take the probation than to get nothing at all. 
At least that way, the person now has a criminal 
record, and if we catch him doing it again, we've 
got him. 

"Arson cases are very, very difficult to 
prosecute," Sciortino cwitinued. "The biggest 
problem is the lack of witnesses. If, as it is in a lot 
of cases, the owner of the property is responsible 
for an arson, it's also nearly impossible to prove 
because nine times out of 10, he's got an alibi. He 
was home with the wife and kids." 

Sciortino said he is opp<»ed to the manner in 
which arson laws are wwded. "they're definitely 
not the best to work with from a prosecutor's point 
of view," he said. "You're starting off in the hole 
to begin with." 

The courts, Sciortino said, have no(. been 
supportive of prosecutor's efforts in arscMi cases. 
"From what I've seen, the courts are fairly 
lenient," he said. "In talking to the state fire 
• marshall's office, I doi't get the feeling that they 
believe the courts have been too hard. A lot of 
times, the court takes into ccMisideraticm the 
person's background, especially if he is a 
first-time offender, and particularly if he is a kid. 
But, as I've said, arson is a crime of violence, and 
I d(Mi't care if the person is a first-timer, they 
should go to the penitentiary." 

Sciortino said commai law arson, the burning 
of a dwelling at night is a class-two felcmy and 
carries a penahy of life imprisaiment. If the 
dwelling is temporarily unoccupied, ScicMlino 
said, the penalty becomes a class-three felony 
with imorisonment frwn five to 20 years. If the 
arscMi occurs in the daytime, Sciortino said, the 
penalty beccmies a class-fair felony and carries a 
priswi sentence of two to 10 years. 

"It's a worthwhile gamble for arsonists," said 
Hundley. "They know they can stand to make a 
whole lot of money from insurance. And the 
danger they run is practically a slap on the wrist if 
they get caught." Added Wade: "Only aie out of 
10 convicted arsonists ever go to prison. Those are 
pretty good odds in their favor." 

Hundley said there are three types of arson: 
arson by juveniles, arson for revenge and arson 
for profit. "I can guarantee you that there arc 
cdlege-educated people who go around burning 
property few profit; that's what they do for a 
living." Could such pec^le have been involved in 
the recent rash of arsais in Virginia Beach? "It is 
possible they've been here," said Hundley. 
Who are these arsonists? 
Hundley: "They come from troubled back- 
grcHinds. They are in crisis. They're unemployed. 
They have severe financial prd)lems. They are 
loners, anti-social and uneducated. They've had 
other brushes with the law. "TTiey have no c(Hicern 
for the community (x f« humanity. In shcHt, they 
are pathetic." 

Sciortino: "Outside of those who are pyrwnan- 
iacs, arsonists have classic characteristics. In the 
majority of cases, it is the owner of the property 
who l\appens to be in a lot of financial trouble and 
**hc is desperate. Also, in a lot of cases, they are 
very selfish and greedy." 

"In a way, I have some sympathy for these 
people," said Hundley. "They are human beings 
with serious problems who obviously need sane 
attention. Fire is sometimes for them a way of 
getting that attention." 
Does Sciortino feel the same way? 
"Hell no," he said. "Other peqjle have 
financial and emotional problems. Everybody has 
got problems. Those are just not good reasons to 
commit crimes." 

Hundley added that his office can use all the 
help it can get in sdving the recent anon cases. 
"We need the community's eyes and ears," he 
said. Anycme with any information is aslKd to call 
the 911 emergency number or Virginia Beach 
Crime Solvers at 427-0000. 



^"^^ 



wmmmmm 



16 Virginia Beach Sun, February 16. 1983 



Virsinia Beach Public Notices 



The next time someone comes to visit you, give them a chance to see Virginia, too. 

Swim and sun at world-famous Virginia Beach, and feast on marvelous seafood from the 
Chesapeake Bay. Take a carriage ride down Duke of Gloucester Street in Colonial Williamsburg, the 
only entire 18th century town in America. And enjoy breathtaking views in the Blue Ridge Mountains. 

Trace the footsteps of George Washington along the historic streets of Fredericksburg, and vis- 
it Richmond's St. John's Church, where Patrick Henry called for "liberty or death!' So much to see 
and do, from the beautiful Shenandoah Valley to the first settlers' fort and threetiny ships at James- 
town. From the NASA Museum at Hampton to elegant James River plantations like Carter's Grove. 

Can one state really offer such a variety of beaches, mountains, history and fun? Yes. Virginia! 
This yean share it with someone you love. 



^^^^^^^^^ 



NMcHMriiif 



ZI 





Hue VUge MountrtB, with spectacular vistas from the 
Skyline Drive and Blue Ridge F^rkvvay, 




Mount Vemon, home of George Washington andonerf 
c^l Presidential homes in Virginia. 



"^^vv^^ rfi^Sfr*^ 







i^ 



"''ftfe 




VirjMi Beach. Beautiful ocean beaches for sunshine, seafood and excitement. 



The islands of the Eastern Shore, known for wild ponies, 
beautiful waterfowl and secluded beaches. 



UgalNttict 



J 



i^pl Notice 



Ufal Notict 



'.ii^iij ;r><; .1- ■•*■• 



m 



A Year of 
Celet)rations 



Take Notice that 10 
days after this 
publication, on the 
premises of A-1 Auto 
Repair, 204 First Colonial 
Rd, Virginia Beach, Va. 
the undersigned will sell at 
public auction, for cash, 
reserving unto itself the 
right to bid, the following 
motor vehicles: 

1977 Kawaski #K4E107- 
009; 1973 Chevrolet, ffl\- 
77B2U446016; 1977 Dat- 
sun, #KPLF 10040461; 
1974 Chevrolet, #ID35L- 
4243932 
187-4 IT 2/16 VB 



USE THIS FORM 
TOSUBSCRUETO 

THE VIRGINIA iEACH SUN 

138 ROSEMONT ROAD 

Virginia Beach, Va., 23452 



547-4571 



NAME 

ADDRESS. 

CITY 

STATE . 

ZIP 



PHONE. 



WITHIN TIDEWATER AREA 

DOnc year $9.00 
DTwo years $15.00 

Only 17( An Issue! 
ALL OTHER AREA 

DOne year $11.00 
DTwo years $17.00 

PLEASE CHECK HERE if this is 
a new subscription. D 
PLEASE CHECK HERE if you 
are now receiving TNI VIRGINIA 
BEACH SUN and are renewing 
your subscription. □ 



Virginia: In the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court 
of the City of Norfolk on 
the 21st day of January, 
1983. 

Joseph James Cotton vs. 
Ethel Minett Lassister 
Cotten, E)efendant. 

The object of this suit is 
for the complainant to ob- 
tain from the defendant a 
divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii upon the 
grounds of one year 
separation without 
cohabitation or interrup- 
tion. 

An affidavit has been 
made and filed that the 
Teste: 

Hugh L. Stovall, Clerk 
Gwendolyn K-Mayo, 
D.C. 

Arthur G. McGowan p.q. 
181-124T2/16VB 



MECHANICS LIENT 
SALE ' 

By virtue of Section 43- 
34 of the Virginia Motor 
Vehicle Code, the under- 
signed will sell at public 
auction on March 8. 1983 
at 10 a.m. at 4972 Virginia 
Beach Blvd., Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, the 
following motorcycle to 
satisfy lien for repairs 
and/or storage. 



1981 Kawasaki, ID 
#JKAZFC12BA015788 

1972 Kawasaki, ID 
#S2F11I05 



Cycle World 
D. J. Norton, Jr. 
185-12 IT 2/16 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals will con- 
duct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, March 2, 1983, at 
7:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Municipal Center, Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
The staff briefing will be at 6:45 p.m. in the City 
Manager's Conference Room. The. following ap- 
plications will appear on the agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 

1. Freddie T. and Tillie M. Baker requests a variance to 
allow parking of major recreational equipment in front 
of a building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 19, Block 51, 
Section 7, Aragona, 705 DeLaura Lane. Bayside 
Borough. 

2. Wendy's International, Inc. requests a variance of 6 
parking spaces to 30 parking spaces as previously gran- 
ted by the Board of Zoning Appeals on August 2, 1978 
instead of 36 parking spaces as required (431 square 
foot restaurant addition) on Lots 17, 19, and 21, Block 
52, Section 2, Virginia Beach, 2201 Pacific Avenue. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

3. Shore Drive Associates, by H. E. Perrel, General Par- 
tner, requests a variance of 4 feet in fence height to an 8 
foot fentx instead of 4 feet in fence height as allowed in 
a required setback from a street (Shore Drive) on a 
3.631 Acre Parcel, Diamond Springs, Shore Drive. 
Bayside Borough. 

4. Burlage Corporation requests a variance of 5 feet to a 
"0" setback from the east property line (boardwalk) in- 
stead of 5 feet as required and to allow parking in the 
required 5 foot setback from the west property line 
(Atlantic Avenue) where prohibited and to waive the 
required landscaping in the required 5 foot setback from 
the west property line where required on Lots 1 through 
12, Block 9, Virginia B«ich, 804 Atlantic Avenue. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

5. James Jangl requests a variance of 2 feet to a 6 foot 
side yard setback (south side) instead of 8 feet as 
required (residential addition) on Lot II, Crystal Lake 



Acres, 5506 Meer Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

6. C & S Corporation requests a variance of 10 feet to a 

"0" side yard setback (west side) instead of 10 feet as 

required on Lot 20, Block ill, Lakewood, 13th Street. 

Virginia Beach Borough. 

7 C & S Corporation requests a variance of 10 feet to a 

"0" side yard setback (west side) itutead of 10 feet as 

required on Lot 21, Block 111, Lakewood, I3th Street. 

Virginia Beach Borough. 

8. C & S Corporation requests a variance of 10 feet to a 
"0" side yard setback (west side) instead of 10 feet as 
required on the Eastern 25 feet of Lots 22 through 27, 
Block III, Lakewood, 13th StrMt. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

9. Jack Rabbit Mini Storage/Hilltop requests a variance 
of 25 feet to a 10 foot setback from Jack Rabbit Court 
instead of 35 feet as required and of 2 feet in fence 
height to a 6 foot fence instead of a 4 foot fence as 
allowed in a required setback from a street on Lot 6, 
Hilltop, Jack Rabbit Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 

10. John A. and Jane D. Hafling requests a variance of 
3 parking spaces to "0" parking spaces instead of 3 
parking spaces as required for a duplex on Lot 5, Block 
12, Ubermeer, 5300 Atlantic Avenue. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

11. William E. Wood and Associate Realtors requests a 
variance of 23 feet to a 12 foot setback from Indian 
River Road instead of 35 feet as required (commercial 
addition) on a Parcel, Acredale, 5308 Indian River 
Road. Kemps ville Borough. 

12. Helen L. Foos requests a variance of 2 feet in fence 
height to 6 feet in height instead of a 4 foot fence as 
allowed in a required front yard setback on Lots 1 , 2, 1 1 
and 12, Block 15, Croatan, Chautaugua Avenue. Lyn- 

- nhaveS'Borough. 

13. B. B. Bryan requests a variance of 1 foot to a 9 foot 
side yard setback (north side) and of 1.5 foot to an 8.5 
foot side yard setback (south side) instead of 10 feet 
each as required (placement of mobile home) on Lot 6, 
Block F. Cardinal EsUtes, 1320 Skylark Drive. Princess 
Anne Borough. ' 

14. Suiuise Associates, II requests a variance of 3.5 feet 
in building height to 38.5 feet in height instead of 33 feet 
in building height as allowed and of 2 feet to a 16 foot 
side yard adjacent to a street (58th Street) instead of 18 
feet as required (deck) on Lot A, Block 7, Ubermeer, 
Southwest Corner of Ocean Avenue and 58th Street. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

15. Lawrence R. and Leslie P. Siegel requests a variance 
of 7 feet to a 13 foot side yard setback (west side) in- 
stead of 20 feet as required (swimming pool) on Lot 48, 
Section 1, Redwood Farm, 1292 Southfield Place. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

16. Texaco, Inc. requests a variance of 10 feet to a 25 
foot setback from the right of way line established on 
the Master Street and Highway Plan as adopted by City 
Council instead of a 35 foot setback as required (South 
Plaza Trail) and of 48 square feet off sign area to 594 
square feet of sign area instead of 546 square feet of sign 
area as^aUowed and of 9 signs to 14 signs ihstead of 5 
signs as allowed on a Parcel, Section 1, Princess Anne 

'* Plaza, 310 Rosemont Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 

17. Texaco, Inc. by James H. Flippen, Jr. requests a 
variance of 11 signs to 16 signs instead of 5 signs as 
allowed on Lots 1 and 9 and 11 through 18, Block 5, 
Pecan Gardens, 3600 Holland Road. Princess Anne 
Borough. 

IS.Texaco, Inc. by James H. Flippen, Jr. requ^ts a 
variance of 152 square feet of sign area to 602 square 
feet of sign area instead of 450 square feet of sign area 
as allowed and of 10 signs to 15 signs instead of 5 signs 
as allowed on Part of Parcel A, Plat of Property of 
' George F. Darden, Jr., Great Neck Meadows, 1280 
Great Neck Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 
19. Texaco, Inc. by James H. Flippen, Jr. requests a 
variance of 129 square feet of sign area to 602 square 
feet of sign area instead of 473 square feet of sign area 
as allowed and of 10 signs to 15 signs instead of 5 signs 
as allowed on Parcel A, Lillel Farms, Inc., 1900 Center- 
ville Turnpike. KempsvUle Borough. 
DEFERRED AGENDA: 

I. John W. Kellam requests a variance of 13 feet to a 5 
foot side yard adjacent to a street (Fentress Avehue) in- 
stead of 18 feet as required and of 4 feet to a 4 foot side 
yard setback (East Side) instead of 8 feet as required 
(accessory building • storage shed) on Part of Lot 21, 
Block 8, Chesapeake Shores, Fentress Avenue. Bayside 
Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 
Garland L. Isdell 
Secretary 
185-13 2T 2/23 VB 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center. Princess Anne 
Station. Virginia Beach, Virginia on Monday, February 
28, 1983, at 7:00 p.m. at which time the following ap- 
plications will be hrard: 



ZONING 



DISTRICT 



CHANGE OF 

CLASSIFICATION: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

1. An C^dinance upon Application of G. R. McBride 
Trust, Robert G. McBride. Trustee, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community Business District to A-2 Apartment District 
on the South side of Shore Drive^ginning at a point 
2100 fMt more or less East of Diamond Spring Rc^d, 
running a distance of 213 feet along the South side of 
Shore Drive, running a distance of 375 feet along the 
Eastern property line, running a distance of 3600 f«t 
more or less along the Southern property line (Northwn 
boundary of Lake Smith) and running a distant of 600 
fe^ along the Western property line. Said pared is 
located at 5451 Shore drive and contains 2.7 acr«. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of Wayen B««le for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to R- 
8 Residential District on certain property locat«l on the 
East side of Greenwell Road banning at a point SSO 
fe^ mme or less South of Powells Point Road, running 



a distance of 222.95 feet along the East side of GrMn- 
well Road, running a distance of 115 feet along the 
Southern property line, running a distance of 100.57 
feet in a Northerly direction, running a distance of 18.43 
feet in a Westerly direction, running a distaiKe of 87.33 
feet in a Northerly directicm and running a distance of 
120 feet along the Northon property line. Said parcel 
contains 22.433 square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

3. An Ordinance upon Application of Lewis W. and 
Rose S. Breedlove for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from R-4 Residential 
District to 0-1 Office District on certain propwty 
located on the South side of Wildwood Drive beginning 
at a point 172 feet East of First Colonial Road, running 
a distance of 100.48 feet along the South side of Wild- 
wood Drive, running a distance of 170 feet along the 
Eastern property line, running a distance of 116 feet 
along the Southern property line and running a distance 
of 170.79 feet along the Western property line. Said 
parcel contains 18,443.5 square feet more or less. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMITS: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

4. An Ordinance upon Application of Creative 
Displays, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for two 12' x 25' billboards on property located on the 
West side of Rosemont Road, South of the Virignia 
Beach-Norfolk Expressway on Lots 17 thru 25, Block O 
and Lots 13 thru 27, Block R, Rosemont. Said parcels 
contain 2.5 acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

5. An Ordinance upon Application of Creative 
Displays, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for two 10.5' x 36' billboards oii certain property 
located on the South side of Holland Road beginning at 
a point 200 feet more or less East of Rosemont Road, 
running a distance of 1100 feet more or less along the 
South side of Holland running a distance of -852.14 feet 
along the Eastern propoty line, running a distance of 
641.52 feet along Uie Southern property line and run- 
ning a distance of 870 feet along the Western property 
line. Said parcel contains 17.401 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Application of Creative 
Displays, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for one 10.5' x 36' billboard on certain property located 
on the West side of Holland Road beginning at a point 
250 feet South of Stoneshore Road, running a distance 
of 270,53 feet along the West side of Holland Road, 
running a distance of 450 feet along the Southern proper- 
ty line, ruiuiing a distance of 520.12 feet along the 
Eastern propmy line, running a distance of 280.52 feet 
along the Soutli side of Stoneshore Road, running « 
distance of 250.03 feet in a Southeasterly direction and 
running a distance of 168.46 feet in a Northeasterly 
direction. Said parcel contains 4.405 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon Application of Holiday Village, 
Inc., by ^, M> 9q«her and R, CBoahn fota CON- 
DITIONAL USE.PSIWIT for an automobile service 
station with convenience store and registration office on 
certain property located on the West side of Gaieral 
Booth Boulevard b^innkig at a point 190 feet South of 
South Birdneck Road, running a distance of 210.5 feet 
along the West side of General Booth Boulevard, run- 
ning a distance of 151.68 feet along the Southern 
oroperty line, running a distance of 186.67 feet along 

e Western property line and running a distance of 
135.58 feet along the Northern property line. Said par- 
cel contains 28,357.5 square feet. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

8. An Ordinance upon Application of Douglas and Pat 
Perry for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a single 
family dwelling b the AG-1 Agricultural District on cer- 
tain property located 2200 feet more or less North of 
London Bridge Road beginning «t a point 4224 feet 
more or less West of 0(xana Boulevard, running a 
distance of 443.01 feet along the Western property line, 
running a distance of 1040.13 feet along the Northom 
property line, nuuiing a distance of 466.66 feet along 
the Eastern property line and running a distance of 
933.28 feet along the Southon pr<^)erty line. Said parcel 
contains 10 acres. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

PUNGO BOROUGH: 

9. AppMl from Decisions of Administrative Offices in 
regvd to calain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce. Subdivision for Patrick W. Bruz»se. Pr(q>»ty 
located on the North side of Pungo Ferry Road, 640 feet 
more or less West of Carmel Street. Plats with more 
detailed information are available in the Department of 
Planning. PUNGO BOROUGH. 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

10. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative OfRccn in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for James N. Belote, III. Property 
located on the East side of Woodstock Road, 720 feet 
more or less North of Providence Road. Plats with more 
detailed information are av«uliU)le in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 

11. An Ordinance upon Ai^lication of Hudgins and 
Associates for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 3 
duplexes at the Northwnt comer of Parks Avenue and 
13th Street on the Weston 100 feet of Lote 22 Uiru 27, 
Block 111, Lakewood. said parcels contain 15,500 
square feet. VIRGINU BEACH BOROUGH. 
AMENDMENTS: 

12. Motion of the Planning commisnon of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to anKiKl land reordain Article .i 
2, Section ^X^c) of the Comprehensive Zoning Or- 
dinance pertaining of lots of unusual depth. More 
detailed inf(Minati(m is avail^le in the Dq>artment of 
Planning. 

13. Motion of die Plannii^ Commi^on of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to an^id and r«>rdain Article 
9. Section 901(a) of the 0)mprdiensive Zonii^ Ch^- 
dinance pertaimng to use rcfulations in tiie B-1 
Business-Residential IMstrict. Mwe detailed infor- 
mation is available in the DepartmoA of Planning. 
Plats with more (^aikd informatim are avaUabk in the 
Department of Planning. 

AU interested persons are invited to attend. 
Ruth Hodges Smith 
City Clerk 
185-7 2T 2/16 VB 



1 



ii»n--liji|i 



Virginia Beach Sun, February 16, 1M3 17 



Classified Ads 




S.LMtiFMMi 



1.AI 



* Vi HWp ^PM^W 




lS.OpphMM 



tt-AirtifiM 



LOST • Manila fcrider with old 

pictures. Great sentimental 

value. Lost Great Bridge 9x>p- 

pina Center am. Reward. Call 

421-2866. 

34T3/16 



4.AiHM 



roBD • 196S MiMtaag. fastlwi^. 
Motor, tnuuminioa. and rev 
Old in good ikapes. Bodyneeib 
rq»ir. $a00n«otM>le. Oil 383- 
2340. 

. 44T^23 

PABTS ■ 1968 Skylark Buick. 
excellent engine and tran- 
smission. $73 takes the whole 
car. Call Wednesday thru Sun- 
day at 427-1901. 

4TFN 



mOCESS MAIL AT HOME 
$30.00 per hundred! No ex- 
pericncr. Part w full time. Start 
inuaetUately. Details, send self- 
addressed, stamped envdope. 
Haiku Distributors, IIS 
Waipalani Rd., Haiku, HI 
96708. 

10-TTN 



UNDEBCOVEIt WEAR Home 
Ui^ene Party - As seen on P.M. 
Magazine and the Today show. 
Ladies have a party and receive 
free lingerie or become an agent, 
unlimited earnings potential. 
CaU Bdinda at 487-4709 after 6 
caU42M408. 

24T216 



PART TIME To Market A Ne« 

Weight Mamgement Program - 

Be introduced to a leading 

nutrition company. No door to 

door. Training provided. Call 

543-3274. 

'__ 104T2-16 



MHIWAfflER - Needs gasket. 
$25. CaU 420-7719. 
I31TN 

DISHWASHER . Scan Kcn- 
RMire, portable. Good ooncUjoii. 
$100. Call 587-0273. 
. 13 IT 2^ 



STOVES - Electric, clean, 
guaranteed, $30 and itp. CaU 
anytime. 837-6332. 
_^_ I34TS-2 



REFRIGERATOR $173, 
Washer-dryer $230. Excellent 
condition. Cash. CaU 486-7123. 
13 IT 216 



FIREBIRD - 1912 Special TELIVHONE SALES - Mor- 



XMAS BILLS 

Or Any PwpMC Rcdty Lo«H 

Vlr^aia-North CaroHaa 

Or Many Other States 

WITH GOOD CSEBIT 

UP TO 100^ OF VALUE 

KJINANCE MORTGAGES 

lil,2wi,or3ni's 
in sooM caaet hitcnat as low as 

12% 
BAD CREDIT 

UPTO Mm W VALUE 
GUAaABnSm APBBOVAL . ■ 

STOP FORECLOSUBES 
PAY nfrJUDGEMENTS 

TURNED DOWN 

BY OTHEHSr Doi«rr <aVEUF 

Wc Have Private iMilon 

COMMERCIAL 

Property Loaat Abo AvallaMc 

ALSO WILL BUY 

MORTGAGE NOTES 

OPEN TILL 8 PM 

SAT. 10 TILL 2 PM 

CAPITAL ASSOOATES 

499-lU4.4n-l2Si 
l-T?N 



JUNK CARS AND TRUCKS - 

Towed free. Some bought. Call 
485-1961 or 485-5859. 
ITFN 

NEED 28 peopk who would Uke 
to lose 7 to 13 pounds the Ist 
week and 3 to 7 pounds per wedc 
thereafter. Only th serious need 
to an>ly. Call 487-9605. 

14T2-23 



Edition, d«^ Uue, T-ti^, 4 
qieed, 4 cyUnder, all optkms. 
Excellent condition. $10,700. 
CaU 387-8824. 
44T3-9 

CCMVETTE - IM2, white with 
■ red interior, smoked glass tops, 
fuUy equipped. AU avaUable op- 
ti<»s.CaU46^S637. 
44T2-23 

nHtD ■ 1978, LTD II. radio, 
vinyl roof, automatic, clean, 
good condition, retaU book value 
S2923, asking $2,200. CaU 482- 
2246. 
44T3-2 

BLAZER - 1977. big tires, 
AM/FM, CB radio combination, 
4 wheel drive, burgandy and 
white. Ovinia wiU anist with 
fUundng. 001423-0909. 
4 IT 2-16 

JEIV8, CARS. TRUCKS under 
SlOO avaUaUe at local govem- 
ment sdes in your area. Call 

9f5i ^y^n9*dtert6ryr24 
houn. 
44T2-I6 

AUSTIN MARINA • GT, 1974, 

v^y good condition, new inspec- 

ticm. AM/fM stereo, $1400. CaU 

463-0618. 

, 44TM6 

CAMERO - 1968, 6 cyUnder, 

automatic, California clean. 

Very good condition. $2000. CaU 

4200114. 

42TM6 

CADILLAC -. 1976 Coupe 
DeViUe, EiueUent condition. Ex- 
tra, extra clean. CaU 428-0068. 
44T3-2 

DODGE ■ 1973. Charger, 
automatic, power steering and 
brakes, air. Must see. $1,230. 
CaU 853-2033. 
44T^23 



THE LOCK SHOP And Things - 

2981 South MUituy Highway, 
Chesapeake, Va., 483-1930. 
Comi^ 24 hour locksmith ser- 
vice. 

I4T^23 



DKXNME TAX • and Account- 
ii« Ondnding tax audib). Mario 
Venditti. farmer Itevcroe Afent, 
3707 Viipiria Beat* Mvd. (near 
Roseamt Rd.) OJI 463-6601. 

ITTN 



CADILLAC - 079 Fleetwood 
Brougham, loaded, excellent 
omdition. black, $8200 or best 
offer. CaU 623-4332. 

44T2-I6 



7. 



SUZUU • 1981, RM-100, Dirt 
VOx, OBis ridden a ooivie of 
awathf . Good condHion. S7Q0 
or best offo. Cd «teyi 5«-4M4 
or evcmfs 347-4779. 
74T34 



S^BbbIb 



mOBVE A MACTEBCAn» 

(» Vfaa. Oorutteed. nobody 
nfoaed; for free brodinre caU 
Halie of Cratt, Mfl free I-IOO^ 
40-153! anyltaM. 

., iim 

NEED CREDIT HELP? • 

fbBo^m a kta^ovani or Vta, 
G^^MCMl, Nobody rdtoed; 
for fne teoefawe send S.A.S.E. 
to Htmm of Credit. Bern 280570. 
DaUas, Texas 75228 w call 
Anyttaiel-2l4-324-»44. 

24T3/I6 



NEED CREDIT HELP? • 

lUoavc a Maswrord or Visa, 
Gu^antettl. N<*ody refuMd, 
for free bro^ae tmd SA^ 
to Ho«e of Oe*. •» »S10. 

DaBM, Tom 73^, O'ai <■ 
214-324-3944. 

24T3-I6 



HLAN AHEAD • For the 19«3 
boating icaiaa. Sipt avtfriiie 
for power and stf. CoMact htte 
MetUey. Wta^ Poto Resort 
IttaiM Rcaort. k 80O-5»-37«. 
82TM6 



u. 



LSGAL KCSETARY - WM 



AAtar Mn. Ort^. 
S5«. 



Ctf 399^ 



M4T2-I6 



EMxmiMST mcmn - for 

for iMie irtBraatfai crt 3B«- 

tu^em m.nm. 

W<TM< 



ning hours, salary and bonuses. 
No experience necessary. We 
train. Great for students and 
housewives. CaU 627-1999. 

10 TEN 



ll.PiBMMItWMltBrf 




GENERAL HOUSEcleaning 
reUable and experienctid. Ca.' 
340-1389. 

IITFN 



NURSES AIDE • Experienced, 
would Uke private duty hosfHtal 
care, certified, references. Have 
own transportation. CaU 399- 
4819. 

114T3-2 



WILL DO UH)NING • In my 

Deep Creek (Travelers Trailer 
OMirt) home. By the piece or flat 
rate. Call 183.3242. 

' IUT3-2 



UNBELIEVABLE Opportunity 
• With Franklin Marketing 
Company. Extra income, no 
risk, minimum nranthly invest- 
ment for super returns. Call 
Wayne at 547-2059. 

12 4T 3-16 



13.Nts 



STOP LIVING IN FEAR. 

Complete Dog Training 3 mon- 
ths (0 3 years. Licensed from 
largest k-9 Corp. in the nation., 
CaU 481-6999. 
13-TFN 



NANDAY CONOUR • Part 
hand tamed, young bird. Can be. 
uught to talk, cage included. 
Moving must seU. $75. CaU after 
6,^7.6280. 

13TTN 



GERMAN MEPARD Pup- 
pses - AKC registered, for piet 
or show. $150 and ^ip. 
COUNTRY SQUIRE 
SffiPARDS. aU488-M8S. 
.13-TFW 



SIAMESE KITTENS - Red 

Point, regiitered: champioa 
sired, dww qwytty, fiOO. 481- 
3358 

I3TFN 



OOUXfi REnOiVDt - For 

Stud, AKC registered, dark 
goldeii, 2i4 year old. (teu^Ma 
bloodfine. Choice of fee or pick 
of Utt0. CaU aftCT 3, 804-&3- 
2i»l. 
niTW 



(NJ> B«IGUHI aiEZPDOG • 

Puppies, AKC roistered, 
weaaed in March, dq»sit wffl 
h(rid.CU 467-^69. 

13 « 3-^ 



IS. 



G. E. JT' ELECTRIC RAN'.:^ 

per«ae, Sl». 30 Aqr wmo^ 
OB both. UcntefootCoU^M 
rrfr^erator, coops^oe, $175. 
CM Tu^Me««ed TracHag Co. 

i?fri-g 



IVORY COLLECTION • 

Statues, Netsike, Oriental 
screens, silks, doisonne neck- 
laces; Vases and Btau. IW* 
Granby St., 625-9119. OaUy 10- 
5. 

I8TFN 



19. 



OILS UKES • 20 tach. $13. 10 
speed $33, 5 speed S25. Cafl 420- 
7719. 

I9MTFN 



16.ArtieiwF«rlBlB 



SWIMMING POOL SLIDE - 

S2S0, Galvinized Big T Gym set, 
$20. 3 by 3 black slate black 
board, $13. CaU 420-7719. 
I6TFN 

ELECTRIC HOSPnAL BEO- 

Complete with mattress, 3 level 
buttons, head, foot & heighth of 
bed. ExceUent condition. Orig. 
$1200. One year old $600. Com- 
mode Chair -exceUent condition 
$35.00. CaU 427-1901 Wed. thru 
Sun. 

^^^^ IfTFN 



BED FRAME - Queen size, 
worlds strongest, $30. CaU 343- 
4767. 

16IT2-9 



ORGAN - KimbaU Swiager 600. 
good condition. $373. CaU 421- 
3852. 

204T^23 



n.i9Mami%w 



SEARS STEREO • AM/FM, 8 
track, turn ubie. $30. CaU 420- 
7719. 

2I4TTFN 



22.JMnlry 



17. 



MAKING ROOM FOR BABY 

Sale - 4 piece living room suite, 
coffee table and 2 end tables, 9 x 
12 avacado rug with pad. 
EtagCTe, dresser, painting. AU in 
good condition. Make 
reasonable offer. Cd 42B-119?. 
n 4T 2-16 



LADOB JEWELRY rOR BALE 

One ladies cocktafl ring with 43 
MfumAt and is 14 carat yeUow 
gold. Also a 14 carat white goA 
23 jewel ladiei Bulova watch. 
Ring appraited af $3400 and 
watdi awraised at $1900. WUI 
seU either for half the appraised 
vahK. Can 347-0838 after 3:00 
pa>- 22TPN 

hi.U 



SOFA AND CHAIRS - brown 
and tan plaid, 3 cushion, sofa, 2 
olive green velveteo) barrel back 
chairs, $75 each. Black vinyl bar, 
$50. 2 bean bag chairs, while and 
yellow $5. CaU 420-7719. 

17TFN 



34.WaBlMlTtlBy 



COUCH - Nee**- repair, material TABLE SAW • Prefer cvbide 

in good condition. Greoi with Made. WUI pay cash. CaU 627- 

flowen. Call 495-3894. 30208 -3 p.m. Ask for Lisa. 
I71T2-16 



K<»3iLER CONTEMPORARY 

Sofa - ftitton tuttei, antique 
gold crushed valour fabirc, super 
confortabk, and in good con- 
dition. $113 or beat offer. CaU 
424-3327. 
I72T2-9 



BEDROOM SET - 4 i^ecea, Uke 
new. $400 or best offer. CaU 383- 
2431. 
I7IT2>9 



3 PIECE SOLID TEAKWOOD 

Stereo Cabinet - 83" long, lou of 
storage space tor tapa and 
records. Hu S<my reel-to<^ 
tape deck and Sony receiver 
SR6030, 30 watu per diannel. 2 
Saimd speaken, SP2000. ^lace 
in cabinet for turntable. AU for 
$800. CaU 388-381 1. 

nrwH 



vASH PAID • Virginia Beach 
Antique Co. pays cash for an- 
tiques, old furniture, clocks, 
glassware, lamp*, china, oil pain- 
lings, oriental rugs, old iron and 
antique toys. We buy one piece 
or entire housefullt. Also, good 
used furniture. CaU 422-4477 
betwcm 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. 

24TFN 



4l^ CMB Wrecked or run- 
ning, ciih-frec toarti^ We abo 
buy used ladiaion nd betciics. 
7 days a iMek. CaU 4r-9222 or 
after 6 p.Bi. 340-1039. 

24TFN 



2S.88Bi1UvTtEst 



It. 



ANTIQUE - Mahogany Dining 
room suit, taUe wtth leaf, 6 
chairs and sideboard. Needs 
fefl^hii«. S330. Oak ddriravd 
$150. Gateleg ubIe $183. 
Mahogany Cora« cui^oard, 
$230. Call 343-3085. Tum- 
UeweedTiai^Co. 
18 IT 1-29 

BK ELEA MARKET and An- 
tique 9iow - At the Itai^foB 
ColiseuB, Sunday February 
1^ 12 BOOB Iffl 9 p.D. lOrs <tf 
nUbitors from 7 alMcs, 



PDR SALK-70 Battroom dance 
lessons. CaU Larry Ouaa for 
Bwre infoiaution 480-2134. 

26-TFN 



Sad 



et AdtmstOB ta SIJO. 0^ 
price afts 3). For man lafor- 
HlloBGd 4224300. 
I82T2-9 



ANTKHn KnCSIN 

Wood/ooal stove. Qeed 
mm. CaH (toys la 547-^1 af- 
ter 6 Gan483-«84. 
UTTH 



2I.L«ni&fiw4w 



42.CiMCart 



J 



LANDSCAPING SERVICE • 

Lawn and CNvden restoration, 
grading and seeding. Free 
s. 421-7330. 

28TFN 



c* 



FtrlMrt 



STORES AND STORAGE areas 

• AU sizes. Properties unlimit«l. 
Marvin Goidfarb. 399-8390, 484- 

1275. 

32TFN 



BABYWITING - My home in 
East Uttte Creek, fenced yard, 
playroom, low rates. CaU 480- 
1932. 

42 4T 2-16 



BABYSITTING • Regular basis, 
excellent care, hot lunches, and 
snacks. Lots of attention. 
Sparrow Road area, call 420- 
4239. 

42 4T 3-16 



HApBrtHMBteFtrlMrt 



APAVfMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS - Great Bridge. 4 
locations, one and 2 bedroom 
apartments. From $260. Rental 
office, 482-3373, evenings 482- 
1492. 369 Johnstown Road. 

33TFN 



GREEN RUN - In Virginia 
Beach, Apartaicau for adulu. I 
and 2 bedroom Gardm Style and 
2 bedroom townhouses. We pay 
heat and hot water. Hie Pines. 
CaU 468-2000. 

""^" 33-TFN 



ai.RsalEiiit* 



HOME RENTALS - Urgently 
needed in the Tidewater area. Let 
us handle your property for per- 
sonal attention. CaU Ellen at 
481-3177 or 481-0612. Letour- 
neou Really. 

364T-3-23 



wN nVTOSMMIM 9CnflMS 



14 KT GOLD HEART - With 
Diamomi pendent, purchased at 
Fine Jewlery Store. Never worn. 
CaU 623-4040. 

22 4T 3-19 



wa MffTMCg 



EARL SMITH OYSTERS - 

Across from Hurd Seafood 
Restauraat. Shucked in own 
natural Jocies. By quartt, pinu, 
or busbel*.OU 340-3171. 

25-TTN 



TYPING SERVICE - For 

businesses and individuals. 7 
days a week, IBM Selectric. 
Reasonable rates. Call either 
467-7112, KanpevUk area, or 
463-0236, HiUtop/Pembroke 
area. 

40TFN 



ALL TYPES ALUXNATORS 

and starters repaired. Battlefieljl 
Auto Eln^ric. CaU 347-3230. 

40.1WJ 



BOOKKEEPER • WiU do books 
in my home. Experienced ia 
payroU and quarterly returns, 
nck-up ami ddivey service. 
Ca& 543-4096 after 3 p.m. for 
more taforouttioa ud r«cs. 

40MTFN 



JOYNBR PROFESSIONAL 
LANMCAnNG aad lawa ser- 
vice. FracaitteMes. 543-4949. 

29TI I 



IWLC»avrLER AND 80K 
bedded Mod and bartt ha^ 
wood, trwklo^, aay sia. 
Proiert yaw dnrtM. Get sow 
whii o« ale. We deVvcr ia oae 

29 Tm 



WALLPAPnOM; - Expcriea- 
oed. referoices. aU work guaraa- 
teed. r a roB. Cafi 587-1904 ask 
forIM>ta. 

404T^23 



4L 



47. 



ADDITIONS - Romns, garages, 
cooverl garages, decks, etc. 
QuaUty work by a licensed 
builder. Free estimates. CaU 340- 
2311. 

47TFN 



ADDITIONS, ROOMS • car- 
pentry, roofing, siding, storm 
window, storm doors, plastering, 
electric, concrete work, (rium- 
bing, guttering, remodeling, kit- 
chen and baths, brick and block 
work, aluminum siding, 
fireplaces, carpeting painting, 
specializing in parking areas and 
driveways, all type of 
demoUtion, free estimate without 
obligation, prompt s^vice. Ser- 
ving aU of Tidewater. Bonded 
and Insured, Suie Registered. 
Ddl 623-7435, 623-6148. or 499- 
5516. 

47-TFN 



INCOME TAX - and Account- 
ing (including tax audiu). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Agent, 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd., (near 
Roeemont Rd.) CaU 463-6608. 
39-TFN 



BOOKKEEPING • Monthly 
balance-sheet, PAL detailed 
trial balance from your checks 
and receipts, stubs, or r^ter 
tapes. 941 's and VA-5's. Up to 
200 checkbook transactions 
monthly; $45. Payables, receiv- 
able, smaU iMyroU. Chesapeake 
only. Call 4204623. 

39-TFN 



BOOKKEEPING SEll%iv» - 

Including quarterly payroll 
reporu and bank account recop- 
ciUation. Speciidizing in smaO 
proprietorships. Pick up and 
deUvery. Retired professional. 
CaU 420-3^4. 

39TFN 



CARPENTRY. PAINTING, 

Mid att types af 
Slorai wiadow*, 

gMUcrs nd tcracai rapitoad. 

^•e atiaMMs. Sndcrs Coa- 

«raetfOB.43M433. 

41TTO 



4t. 



ANDERSON REMODEUNG • 

AU types of bontrrepairs. Pain- 
ting, roofing, siding, carpentry, 
etc. Work guaranteed. Free 
estimates. Insured and bonded. 
CaU 588-2558. 

49TFN 



HOME 
IMPROVEMENT 

Room additioM for all 
pnrpoacg. Coavarl 
garage, raiac doraMii. 

Any type of Improv- 
ment. Bathroom and 
Kitciien remodeling. 

R.H. BLACK 

9994359 397-7171 



SALES 

Interested In 
Making Big 

'^BUCKS'' 

Call Immediately 

463-3540 



SI. PbIrIIri 







WALLPAPERING AND 

PAINTING-Fasi and friendly 
service, local references fur- 
nished. Call us for a free 
climate. Arthur and Company 
Redecorating Conlracton. 420- 
3478. 

3ITFV 



PAINTING • Large or smaU 
jobs. Interior and exterior. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
prices. References available upon 
request. Commercial work also 
done, and light carpentry and 
wallpapering experience. CaU 
397-3483 or 484-1423. 

31 TFN 



92. fwtboffuftif 



THE LEIGH PHOTOGRA- 
PHIC SERVICE - Offers full 
coverage of your needs at your 
wedding. Please call for more in- 
formation and open dates. 482- 
1312. 

mn* 



ss. 



BATHROOM REMODELING - 

Old and new. SpeciaUzing in 
ceramic tile walls and floor 
covering. Reasonable rates. Free 
estimaes. 20 yean experience in 
Tidewater area. SmaU and large 
iobs. Guarantee all work. CaU 
M7.4774 anytime. 

55TFN 



m» a^-ba a ilin.lliB. 



SEARS SEWING MACHINES - 

1 with caUaet, $75. I without 
cabinet $23. CaU 420-7719. 




GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Home sites for sale 

for 

People Planning 

Homes d Custom 

Builders 

SALES OFFICE 

333 Providence Rd. 

CALL 464-9317 




SX12DutehB9n 

$798.00 

(CALL TOMY) 

STATE LINE BUILDERS 

Garages • UlUity Bams • Any Size 
HigliwayMt 

Moyock, N.C. 279M «M LEWIS 

(919) 435-«llt Hom: (M4) 42M5M 



When Sometliiiig Neeib 
Building or RepRired, You Need 

BLACK 

BROS. 

Home Improvemenl 

.Sp(x-iuU.sls 
• Buikliiift ( onl racltir* Roof iiK'arpun s*<iariiges 
•Balh Renio(kl«t«Rootn Additions 
•Aluminum Sidinps* Kitchen Remodeling 

545-7318 

lli«liK.Mwfc.Nr. 




^ 



^ Dean P. EdwRite, lac. 

Additioia, Repairs, C(»crete Work 

and New H(M]% Omrtr^^fNi 

Guaranteed SaUsfi^^tkNi itr 

Quality Workmanship 

Chesapeake: Outer Banks 

804-421-9273 919-^1-2901 



■BManaaiai 



i^MI 



wm 



^ip" 



wmmmm 



mmmmmmmmmam 



18 Virginia Beach Sun, February 16, 1983 




On ly 2.100 To Be Built 



The 1983 Peugeot 505 S Silver Editio 




To mark its 25th year in 
the United States, Peu- 
geot Motors of America is 
unveiling a limited-pro- 
duction automobile, the 
1983 Peugeot 505S Silver 
Edition. Only 2, 100 will be 
built. 

Setting the tone for 
Peugeot's silver anniver- 
sary, the Silver Edition 
has an uncommon finish: 
the paint contains special- 
designed metallic parti- 
cles that absorb cdors 
from the car's surround- 
ings. So instead of the 
monochromatic look of 
ordinary cars, the Silver 
Edition 505 changes con- 
stantly w|th the vividness 
of the entire color spec- 
trum. At sunset, the Sil- 
ver Edition radiates a soft 
red glow. Parked on the 
snow under a cold winter 
sky, it shines like a frosted 
jewel. 



To preserve this strik- 
ing finish and give it a 
rich, deep luster, the Sil- 
ver Edition's special paint 
is protected by a coat of 
clear lacquer. 

Peugeot, Europe's 
second largest automaker, 
began selling cars in the 
United States in 1958 with 
the 403 sedan. Road & 
Track magazine called it 
"one of the world's seveii 
best-made cars." Stan- 
dard equipment on the 
403 included a sunroof, 
reclining "sleep-on" front 
seats, and a choice of 
steel-belted radial or 
white-wall tires. 

White-walls are not 
offered on the Peugeot 
505S Silver Edition, but it 
is the most lavishly equip- 
ed car Peugeot has ever 
offered in the Unked 
States. Among the long 
list of standard features 
are leather upholstery. 



heated driver's seat, 
power sunroof, 40-watt 
stereo cassette player 
with four speakers, and 
matt. 

In addition toils luxury, 
the 505S Silver EditiOT is 
a real driver's machine. 
To begin with, there is the 
interior with its ccmtoured 
bucket seats and leather- 
wrapped steering wheel. 
A strategically-placed left 
footrest helps positicxi the 
driver during spirited 
cornering. The Silver Edi- 
tion comes equipped with 
Michelin's high-perfonn- 
ance TRX tires mounted 
on eight-spoke alloy 
wheels. For safe driving 
in even the worst ccMidi- 
tions, the car has a lindt- 
ed-slip differential tjiat 
assists handling and trac- 
tion in mud or snow and 
high-intensity halogen, 
lights. 



The 505S Silver Edition 
also includes the attri- 
butes of every 505; rack- 
and-pinion stteing, four- 
wheel disc brakes, four- 
wheel independent sus- 
pension, five-speed over- 
drive transmission, and 
all-stael, unibody con- 
struction. It is available 
with a chdce of two 
engines: the XD2S turbo- 
charged diesel (V the XN6 
fuel-injected gasdine 
engine. The turbodiesel 
combines four-cylinder 
diesel economy and dura- 
bility with turbo-charged 
performance; the fuel- 
injected engine delivers 
quick throttle response 
and an impressive 97 
horsepower. 

w 

All Peugeot engines are 
carefully bench-teste^ 
bef(»e installation and 
vlgtnrotfsly road-testeq 
afterwards. This is. one 



SPECIAL PRICES ON ALL CUSTOM VANS . . . 

AS LOW AS $ ft 7^3 



NO ONE ANYWHERE WILL OUT 
SELL OR OUT TRADE VIRGINIA'S 
LARGEST VAN DEALER. 



VQUl 





463-6100 



3443 Va. Beach Blvd. 
Next To Princess Anne Plaza 

DMV8502 



J_ 



WYNNE MOTOR 
CORP. 



M 3,695 



M2,795 



^9,6<)5 



.k.lui lil.uk 



^10,895 



\'m\\\\ U K KIM H \ 
I I alhi r .• ,il-. suiiripiil. ( riii- 
( iinlici lili \M I \1 si.r. 
Wiih ( ^- .11. U.ri Whi . I 



< ,,111.. I' \S .( ( , I ill 



^9.395 



6,995 



\M I M Nl.r.i. ( II, :> I. 
I hilt) ^t uH Spiirl U hi. I- anil 



XI l»\ |->l N ;nM Ol 



.»„., \5.595 



M,895 



AT KLINE CHEVROLET, 

YOU CAN GET A VAN 

WITH EVERYTHING 

TO GO. 

—THE NEW 
WORLD 
CONTINUES— 




'<ii % " HMiHIl ( .111%, 
I ,;i- I ni^iflf ( i.pprr in C .* 



-X( Ml \Kill I I I I ( VMIMi 



M,895 



^7,495 



WVNMMOTORCORP. 



461-6800 



With constant, Internal 
developments and 
progress, we offer you 
quality, built-lD 
conveniences, 
not added 
on! This 
is the 
difference! 

Discover for yourself 
how high passenger- 
miles-per-galloB and the 
16 step "Golden Tonch" 




Inspection procns t»^ 
afford yoa tooaUc-ftcc 
economy and cBjoymeat 
la laxnry and roomineu 

torn 

rIuhmI 
every 
budget. 
Thereto 
no better 
ttaac to explore how yo« 
ai^ U. S. C^nversioM 
can be "In tunc with Ike 




KLINE 

CHEVROLET 



149SS.MiUtary Highway 
3 Miles South Of MiUtary Orcle 



424-1811 



reason why Peugeot 
odometers are calibrated 
to one million miles. 

Peugeots are sdd in the 
United States through a 
netwOTk of 335 dealers 
and are covered by a 
one-year/unlimited 
mileage warranty and 
three-year warranty 

against corrosion. Peu- 
geot Motors of America 

For RK Chevrolet 



maintains a parts availa- 
bility rate of over 95 
percent, one of the high- 
est in the industry, 
domestic automakers 
included. 

Peugeot Motors of 
America, headquartered 
in Lyndurst, New Jersey, 
is part of Peugeot S.A., 
EurqM's second target 
automaker. 



ers in service. 

When RK Chevrolet 
Inc., was awarded the 
Peugeot dealership, they 
wanted to continue to 
provide the same quality 
service they had esta- 
blished for CM cars, so 
they purchased every tool 
and idl parts reoxnmend- 
ed by Peugeot Motors in 
order to service all Peu- 
geots on a reliable and 



timely basis. 

Heading the Peugeot 
service department is 
John Campbell, who 
wlong with F. (Mac) 
MacAulay and Charles 
(Chuck) Esies were fully 
trained at the I^ugeot 
School and are certified in 
all categories by the Na- 
tiMial bistitute fw Auto- 
mrtive Services Excel- 
lence. 



Third Year Supremacy 



For the third year in a 
row RK Chevrolet Inc., 
has won the service 
supremacy award from 
General Motors. RK has 
proven once again that 
they not only havSe one of 
the best service depart* 
ments in Tidewater, but 
when compared to all the 
CM dealership's nation- 
wide, atyty rank in the top 
3 percent. 

Heading this fine ser- 
vice department is service 
director Herman Pair. 
With 35 years of experi- 
ence in service, the last 12 
years at RK, Mr. Pair has 
developed RK's service 
department into such a 
reliable force that RK is 
able to offer a guarantee 
for 6 months or 6,0(X) 
miles on all service. Mr. 



Pair sutes that he is not 
aware of any other dealer- 
ship that gives a guaran- 
tee for that long. Most 
offer the standani 90 days 
or 4,000 miles. 



Assisting Mr. Pair in 
maintaining this high 
efficiency in service is 
Earl Walker who is the 
manlier of the parts 
department. Earl has 
been in the parts business 
for 25 years, the last 15 
years at RK. Jim Marino 
is the body shop manager 
and has 17 years of expe- 
rience. Jim is assisted by 
Jesse Lockfaart. When you 
consider all the years of 
experience these gentle- 
men have, you can readily 
see why they're the lead- 





Pprrv Ril ick Presents The Front Wheel 




Drive Performers 



Skyhawk 

46-28 

Hwy. Mpg 



^T PERRY BUICK 

■■jr; Hwy. Mpg. M13 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 
42 -^ ^ NORTOLK AT NEWTOWN BOAO 

Hwy. Mpg. 

SERVING TIDEWATER OVER 52 YEARS 




Quick's Designs For Driving 



\(61-8855 




Its 

You don't give up 

a thing at Budget where you're #1 

• Low rates by the tfajr, wcdteMi OT loi^H' 
• Free ^kfk ap and dcHvwy 
• Most nuyor owUt cards konond 
• For out-of-town rctnvallow, toH free- 
dial "1" A then 8iM27-«7M 

FOR LOCAL RISESVATIONS CALL 

Norfolh lalenwiloni Mipon • Norfolk, Va. «»«95 

MMN.MilltonrHwy.-NoiMk,VB Hf-MM 

331«Vir^BtaancbaM.-Vh|#riaaMcli,Va. 34M41I 

PolridiHewyAliport-N««vertNcwi,Va.. ...tM^TN 

ll4MMr«nM Avt. - Newport News, Va .S9»4in 

l74«PocriMatasTn«-WMM^NM|.Va »t>M1i 




^ 



11.9% 

Financing 



On All New 

Pontiacs and 

Volvos 

Parkway 



420-5450 



^-^ 



■pp I 




inia Beach Sun 



STfli Ymt, No. «, Vt^rfaBnchTVir 



Vtbnarm*^9»3 




'Scared Out Of My Wits' 

Sun Reporter Goes Undercover, Spends 24 Hours In City Jail 



By Mike Gooding 
Sun Staff Writer 

J. he cell door slammed shut with authority. 

The sound echoed with a frightening sense of 
finality, reminding me that I was indeed trapped 
in the Virginia Beach Correction Center. 

Posing as a residential burglar, I entered the 
city jail incognito, my identity known only to one 
man. Sheriff S. Joe Smith. None of the 187 
inmates knew that I was a newspaper reporter, 
HOT did any of 105 deputies, sergeants, lieuten- 
ants or staff members. 

This was the same jail that cmce housed Paul 
Garnett, the 18 year-dd Green Run student 
c(xivicted last fall of fatally stabbing 31 times his 
high school industrial arts teacher. This was the 
same jail that currently hdds James Wes Taylor, 



the man charged with the recent murder of a 
Virginia BcwA tire store owner. This was the 
same jail in whidi a man arrested for driving 
under the influence hung himself earlier this 
month. This was the jail which lists as its tenants 
rapists, robbers and psychopaths. 

I was, quite literally, scared out of my wits. 

Then, something very reassuring happened, 
something fa which I was not prepared. I got 
respect. 

At age 23, with longish hair and a beard, 
respect is at a decided premium. Going into jail, I 
expected to be treated with even less dignity. 
Much to my surprise, I found an . air of 
professionalism among the guards radically 
different from the cliche image portrayed in 
movies and oii television. Inmates at the Virginia 
Beach jail are addressed as "sir" and "mister," 



and they converse in an amiable fashion with theif 
unarmed guards. This certainly helped allay fears 
nurtured earlier during my ccmfincmcnt. 
"Book Mm" 

The ordeal began around 9 a.m. on sunny 
February morning, as the sheriff drove me to the 
auxiliary jail underneath the Municipal Center's 
Public Safety Building. "Book this man for 
residential burglary," Smith tdd a deputy. 

I was instructed to remove my belt, shirt and 
shoes and told to stand spreadeagle against a 
wall. I was frisked, questioned, and then given a 
phone call. Two guards were within earshot. 

1 was then taken to a holding cell in the back of 
the building. It was cold there, about 50 degrees 
by my estimation. "How about s«ne heat in 
here," I complained. "That's what the blanket's 

See UNDERCOVER. Page 12 



Cento 



cb ^iOH /5 U 3/ i / /OH 
^iKoil.lA ,b I All. -iT^llKMKY 

bt n i MI.D -3L>^1 i Ui 




Sun reporter in city jail 



What Does It Take To Be A Winner? 



The 
Businessman 



The 
Coach 



The 
Mayor 



The 
Vice-Mayor 



The 
Prosecutor 







CavaUer Director Boyd Colgate 



Cox High School CoKh Nancy Fowlkcs 



yb0ai> Beach Mayor Lonte Jtmct 



Virginia Beach Vice-Mayor Barbara Henley Commonwealth's Attorney Paul Sciortino 



ByGregG<Mfarb 

Sun editor 

Sonu people win and some pet^le lose, 
M's the natwe of the game we play, 
A wise mm told me when you reach the top. 
The others hunt you down like prey. < 

'Cause you're a winner. 

By bassist Stanley Qarke, 1981, 
from the song "Winners ". 

Virginia Beach is fiill of wirmers. 

With a reputaticMi f(x recreati(m, and also for its 
affluent and intelligent citizenry, CHd Dominicm's most 
populus dty is a sunny haven for a panoply of 
successful politicians, businessmen, city ofHcials, civic 
leaders and all their cdlective janissaries. When 
combined, these forces make Virginia Beach what it is: 
one of the fastest growing and most popular cities in the 
nation. 



Honesty, Communication, Determination 




Go Go tows 

Citizen Of The Week 

Go Go Goes For Virginia Beach 

The Citi2en-of-the-W«k this w«k is Cassandra Ar- 
nold Barnes, known simply by her friends at City Hall 
as "Go Go." 

Go Go is a Virgiiua Be»:h institution. Despite Iw 
lack of transporution, the award-winning news reporter 
b time like clockwork for every meeting of City Coun- 
dl. the Sdtool B(»u-d, and many othe regular s^sions of 
munidpal iK»rds and commissions. 
SeeC»OO.P««e5 



Virginia Beach is a winner because oi its be^ihes, its 
oceans, its tourist, agriaihure and light industries; plus 
a generous twist of the military, low tax rates and its 
overall professional demeanor. Virginia Beach city 
officials think and aa like winners because the local 
residents demand it. >%ginia Beach's public school 
system, for examj^, is setxnd to none. But 
governments, busuwsses, public services and images 
are only as strong, viable and credible as the peoi^e 
behind them. 

Recently, The Virginia BetKh &in talked with several 
successful Virginia Beach residents who have found the 
correct formula for winning. The Sun asked them what 
it really takes to be a winner. Ihose interviewed were. 



Billy O'Brien, Vapor Lights 

Ddegate J. W. (BiUy) O'Brien. Jr., 83rd 
nstrict, Virginia Beach, recently submitted a bill 
relating to the installation of sodium vapor lights 
along the highways of Virginia. This ImU was also 
submitted by Detegiue O'Brkn durii« the 1982 
Session <tf the General Assembly. The bill never 
got out at ccmmittee that session. 

Delegate O'&kn resubmitted the Mil during 
the IMS Sesskn, as his researdi indkated 
sodium vapor lights were more effident, energy 
and cost-wise, then the incandescent and mercury 
vapor lighu that were presently being used. 
Sodium v^por lights abo provide a greater 
iUamiMitioB thw tlM incandescent and mercury 
vapor ligltts which, in essence, deters crime. 

The 1M3 Sodium Vapcf Light Bill was sent to 
the House Committee on Roaifa and btemal 
Navigation. When it came up for discussion, Mr. 
W. Aubrey Oouncfl, spdssman far VEPOO. 
Spoke to the UU. He stated thiU VEPOO ^tna in 
agreement with Delegate O'Brien about the 
usefiifaKss and e£&iency (rf sodium vapor lights. 
CbuiKnl imsented documents showing the 
VEPOO policy toiranb tlte mstaBatioo of sodium 
vapor Ughts. VEPOO is voluntarily repl«ang 
burned out incandescent and mercury vtpor lights 
with sodium vapor l^hts, excxpt in areas like 
restored WUaavtaq becatae sodium vapor 
lighu (k> not niMtdi the colonial gas lighu 
decnrim. 

Dekg^ (XMen wk^ew hu UU after 
leaning of VEPOC^s vohmtarily coiqjIiaiKe in 
using soifiwn va^xv Ughu iforrq>bcemenu. 
During tlw committee hearing last ytmtaa sodium 
vt^Mt U^s, Oamctl WM present and spoke to tte 
tttue. Howe^^, VEPOO mu not voluntarily 
rqdiKdag burned oM l^ltts with sotfiun vapor 
Ughtt at t^ ^m. 



millicxiaire M.J. "Boyd" Cdgate, Sr., director and 
executive vice president of The Cavalier Hotel, Corp.; 
two time state champion girls field hockey coach at Cox 
High School Nancy Fowlkes; Virginia Beach Coundl- 
woman, and currently the dty's first female Vice- 
Mayor, Barbara Henley; Mayor Lewis R. /ones, a 
businessman who in his first bid for public office not 
only won the highly contested Bayside borough seat but 
also went on to be elected mayor by his peers; and 
Virginia Beach Canmonwcalth's Attorney Paul Scior- 
tino, the city's chief prosecutor. In Nov., 1981, 
Sciortino, was elected by the public over his f«mer 
boss and 14-year incumbent Commonwealth's Attwney 
Andre Evans. 



Boyd Colgate 

tti Boyd Cdgale's business card is featured the 
Cavalier Hotel emblem, containing the phrase, "The 
Cavalier - The yotel That Made Virginia Beach 
Famous." The slogan refers to the Cavalier On The 
Hill, which is a Virginia Beach landmark, and also to 
the new, mojlern oceanfront Cavalier. Annual sales fw 
the two facilities is in the millicms of dollars. 

Colgate, a 37 year businessman and the successful 
owner of a city-block shopping center in Mecklenburg, 
Va., became a Cavalier executive in 1975. Cdgate's 
wife's family owns the hael and property, but alter 
selling the resort and repurchasing it in the mid '70's, it 
was decided that Colgate should manage it. And now, a 
man who remembers getting out of World War II and 
starting to wwk with just a pickup truck and a tod box, 
is a millicHiaire. 

Sec WINNING, Page 4 




GmsU iKtate, la nkMIe, PavlHoa INrcctor Jim Rkketti; Oly MaM|er Thonas Maehlenbeck, with pipe; Police Chief Charles Wall. 
boMc MacUMikeiA; nd Flic (Mtt Hwry INe»i, far right. 



New Visitors Center Opens 

"We're proud to have the tourism industry in 
V^ginia Beach," said Virginia Beach Mayor Lcniis U. 
Jones, coKluding a brief speech he gave before several 
dozen mvited guests recently assembled to celebrate 
the opening erf' Virginia Beach's new Visito- Information 
Center. A formd grand opening is scheduled for later. 

In lUtendance at the ribbon-cutting cxremonies were 
such load notables as the mayor, Virginia Beach Gty 
Coundi members Meyera CM^emdorf, Barbara Henley 
and IH^iam Kitchin, QL in whose Ixx-ough the center is 
located. Kitchin. along with Mayor Jones cut the 
ceremonial ribbon. Virginia Beach Eanomk Develop- 
ment Diie^or A. James DeBellis welcomed the guests. 

Oth« goesU iiKluded Virginia Beach Police Chief 
Charles Wall, Fire Chief rtury Dkzel, fomer Chamber 

SeePROUD.i^^lS 




KUc^.jMwa,aMI 



IV^IW 



« 



2 Virginia Beadi Sun, February 23, 1981 

Sun Commentary 




Editorials 

In Jail 



As far as penal institutions go, one 
could doubtless do worse thah the 
Virginia Beach Corrections Center. 

Of course, there can be no dispute that 
jail, no matter how you spruce it up, is 
still jail. The beds are uncomfortable, the 
food barely palatable, and the bathroom 
facilities, humiliating. But then, what 
should one expect from a jail . . . the 
Cavalier Hotel? As Sammy Davis, Jr. on- 
ce sang, "Don't do the crime if you can't 
do the time." 

When the new city jail opened in 1978, 
it was hailed by the l^al community as a 
great step forward in criminal justice. The 
$5.6 million facility replaced a 
dilapidated, 31 -year old structure rated as 
one of Virginia's worst. 

The new jail features larger cells, ef- 
ficient heating, and a half-million dollars 
worth of el«:tronic surveiUanoe equip- 
ment. It's sleek and ultra-modern. More 
importantly, the new jail fettuics a new 
universal gym and a full library. Although 
not replete with all the creature c(Hnforts 
of home,, the new jail is, at the very least, 
livable. 
But, there would have to be something 



more if the multi-million dollar institution 
were to pay off. That's where the wisdom 
of the jail's overseer came in. Sheriff S. 
Joe Smith has been the differenpe. 

Smith realizes that the key to succ^sful 
incarceration lies in the treatment of 
prisoners. If inmates are allowed human 
dignity and treated as individuals. Smith 
reasons, their confinement will be a 
beneficial experience. They will learn 
from their mistakes, and upon release, re- 
enter society as productive citizens. If 
however, prisoners are denied respect and 
dignity, they will return to society no bet- 
ter off than they were before going to jail. 
They will return to crime and ultimately 
make their way back to jail. 

Should a jail be a place of rehabilitation 
and reform, or should jail be akin to a 
dungeon, a place in which our outlaws are 
cast with the key thrown away? 

Smith chooMt the former, and his 
record qwaks for itself. He has a rate of 
reddivBm of just 20 percent; that is to say 
that 80 percmt of his inmates never return 
to jail. Obviously, Smith is going about 
his job in the proper fashion.— M.M.G. 



Simple Solution To Fighting Crime 



A renewed emphasis on crime in 
America causes one to wonder, "How are 
we really going to combat crime and 
reduce the crime rate?" 

Some experts blame the economy. 
Others blame the courts, the judges, the 
criminal's bacl^pund, Jhe Jlaws» drugs, 
and even the pubhc.' 

Most of the proposed remedies to this 
nation's crime ills are bureaucratic 
rhetoric, which politicians espouse as in- 
surance to help secure re-election. 

But the real solution to Hghting crime is 
as simple as the basic concepts of law and 
order, cops and robbers, good versus bad. 
What this country needs to combat 
crime is a publicity campaign, similar to 
that of the Armed Forces, designed to en- 
courage more men and women to fall into 
the ranks of law enforcement. 

Instead of spending millions of dollars, 
for example, on a task force to curtail 
drug traffic into Florida (which has done 
no good), the money should be spent on 
commercial advertising to attract more 
police officers. 

If there were mcM-e cops, narcotics, and 
law enforcement officers on the streets, 
crime would go down. Prisons would be 
come less crowded because the prisoners 
coming out would think twice about 
committing a crime if they knew the chan- 



ce of them getting caught had now 
doubled because of an increased number 
of law enforcement officers on the streets. 
A person cannot look at television 
today without seeing many, many com- 
mercials calling for our young men and 
women to enlist in the Army, Navy, Air 
Force or Marines. The campaign seems to 
be effective. Why not do the same thing to 
attract law enforcement officers? As long 
as the bad guys continue to outnumber 
the good guys, there is going to be high 
crime rates. 

Just think how much money would be 
saved by both the private and pubUc sec- 
tor if crime could be reduced appreciably? 
Maybe even levy a federal tax on every 
business and individual to help defray the 
cost of hiring additional police officers. 
The money the businesses would save by 
not being victimized by crime could be 
returned back into the community by 
hiring more people. 

Imagine if the streets were safer to walk 
at night? NaturaUy the businesses on 
those streets would do more business. 

Instead of this country spending 
millions of dollars poisoning poppy 
fields, and fortressing Florida, spend the 
money to hire more cops. So the cops can 
catch the bad guys. It's as simple as 
that.— G.D.G. 



School Board Budget 



The 1 1 members of the Virginia Beach 
School B(mid are bracing thenselves for 
an often onotional and usually controver- 
sial rite of spring. 

When the Virginia Gen«-al Assembly's 
1983 session comes to a close this 
weekoid, w<mi of the state's annual 
educational aUotuxnt fm tlK upcoming 
Khool year for ^^rginia Be»:h will be 
released. 

When that happcaSt the wratling will 
begin. School Superintendent E. E. 
Brickell and his a^stants Robert P. 
Stenzhom and Fred Boihem last week 
assured b<Mrd monbo^, at thdr r^ular 
monthly jpeeting, that th^ would have a 
line bud^t drawn up for them within 24 
hours of notification from the state. 

The b<Mrd has already scluduted two 
special night meetings in March to discuss 
the budget in ordxf to be pi^pttred to vote 



on its adopjtion m time for the March 
board meeting. 

Governor Robb has ah^dy inform^ 
the state of a multi-million dollar shortfall 
in this year's overall state budget. He has 
said that education will be among the 
hardest hit areas. Brickell conceded as 
much during the February board meeting. 

Will teachers be given as much of a pay 
raise as Uicy want? Will all capital im- 
provements be funded, or will some be 
put on hold for another ywu" in the hope 
of a more generous future allotment? 
These qu^tions and many others await 
thebcwrd. 

Board members and BrickeU's staff 
face the unenviable task of spreading a 
slim budget over the vast expanse that is 
the ever-growing Virginia Beach school 
system. With a little hick, they will, no 
doubt, find a way.— M.M.G. 



Letters To The Editor 



Concern For Great Neck Road 



Editor: 

Saturday there was another bad. acddent on the 
two-lane portion of Great Neck Road. How many 
aondents will it take to reduce the 43 mile speed limit to 



a safer speed? 



Bonnie HuflT, 
\^rginia Beac^ 



Abnormal Eating Behavior Out Of Order 



Editor: 

Because eating problems are often treated by 
moralizing and nasty humor.^Uie fact that Karen 
Carpenter died suddenly at the age cX 32 helps make 
the point that anorexia nervosa and bulimia are serious 
illnesses and can be life-threatening. 

These eating disorders often begin innocendy with 
their symptoms seen as solutions to a problem, rather 
than as ajiroblem itself; that is, "If I eat as little as I 
can and/or purge whatever food 1 do eat, I can remain 
in control of my weight and, therefore, thin, popular, 
etc." I^ople in the early stages of anorexia or bulimia 
do not realize that, within a short period oftime, this 
abnormal eating behavior get« out of control and begins 
to invade every aspect ctf the person's life. An awftil 
sense (rf helplessness, isolation, depression and loss ci 



self esteem, in addition to serious medical problems, 
are painftil consequences of these dten "secretive 
syndromes." 

As with the alcoholic, but the time many anorectics or 
bulimics seek professional help, they may have already 
lost oontroi over their eating behavior and have begun 
to do severe damage to their bodies and psychological 
well being. 

Once an eating disorder develops, its seriousness 
should not be underestimated. Help is needed. It can 
be lifesaving. 

Robert L DuPont, M.D., Director,: 

Compulsive Eaters Program 

of Tidewater.; 



Beach History In The Library 

■ wfco ImMI iHMMad an imurfeetiaB in Pr 




SUNIinM 




ii 1771, Anthony Uwion. planter, was 
Ktbtncd as ownnif over 1800 acres of kuid, 20 
slaves, and two ridfnt chairs. ^J^IUam NnuDQ, a 
iSumer. owned over 419 acres of land, seven 
slaves and one riding chair. He wouU go on to be 
named sheriff for ftinoess Anne County on Sept. 
19, 1783. 

Facts such as ^ese, fbund while browsing 
through the Virginia BeMdi Public library's 
Princess Anne Collection, give insight into life in 
coastal Virginia during the colonial period. The 
) coUectian. begun in an>raximately 1976, present- 
ly omtains an estimated 300 items. While the 
majority aS these deal with the Princess Anne 
County area during the early period of her history, 
others cover the history <tf other counties as well 
as the Commonwealth as a whole. The ooUectioo 
can be used to trace femily trees or to gain 
information for bo(As or periodical articles. 
Occasionally, the collection serves as a connwting 
point for researchers who, perhaps unknown to 
Mch other, are working on similar topics. A Dr. 
Gatewood, a professor at the University of 
Arkansas, wrote the libnuy for information con- 
cerning Augustus Hodges, a free black living in 
Blackwater in the 18th century. Later, when a 
woman in Connecticut wrote seeking information 
on Augustus' father Charles, the library was able 
to put her in contact with the professor in Arkan- 
sas. 

ine usefiiOness of the coflectkm, however, is 
not solely research oriented. It is Am to browse 
through the materials at random. A flavor (rf 
Tidewater life emerges and makes the past quite 
real to tike reader. Be three-volume "Journal of 
the Coumal of Uie State oS Virginia" relates the 
story (tf Josiah Phillips who was suspected in 1777 
(rf planning an insurrection. Philip had been 
oitlawed by the Governor as a traitor to the State 
on Jum 20, 1777. A letter from John Wilson, 
£squire. Ccwnty lieutenant of Norfolk, named 
PhdliiM along with Liby Sjioes and John Ashley 
and "sundrey evil disposed persons, to U>e 
number of ten or turelve" as luving "cans{Mred 
together to foment a Dangeioitt Inquisition in the 
said dty and at present are huting in secret 
idaoe^tfareatening and doing actual mischief to 
the peaces!^ and well affected inhalntants..." 

A reward of Si 50 was offered to anyone 
qqxelMiMling Phillips and safely ivesenting him 
to the magistrate at Norfolk Coimty. By May 1778. 
the GcNtnxx, after receiving a letter from a 
Coknel Muter about "Phillqx the noted tttttcr" 



an insurrection in Princess 
t die head of SO men, would advise 
100 nca be raised from the Nansemond 
to acljn coniimcrion with other units to 
appnhend FUD^. Tlie reward would be raised 
to $300 and safe imsentation to the Norfolk 
magktrate would no longer be important. The 
reward was for Phillips "dead or alive". Booty 
seized along with him would be divided among 
the capton. FhHI^ was ai>parently captured 
prior to July 20, 1778 when Princess Anne and 
Norfolk Goiuity residents would petition to have 
the IKOlliamsbuig jail guard diaiged with watch- 
ing Phillips increased to four. On Nov. 3 (rf^ the 
same year. $130 would be pidd to John 
Thoroughgood for the use of volunteer company* 
co mm a nde d by Oqitain Amos Weekes whidi had 
aided in the capture. 

"Genealogical Abstracts cS Princess Anne 
County Virginia Court Records" relates the case 
on May 5, 1735 in which Martha Keeling was 
"taken 1^ warrant of Willuun Keelii^. gentle- 
man, for suspidon of her having been (acddeo- 
tally and without design) the occasion of the death 
(tf a negro boy called James belonging to her 
husband Adam Keeling." She would be acquitt- 
ed, 

Thomas Taylor's will left land and slaves to 
various members of his femUy but spedfied that 
his son William "was not to be possessed of some 
crf^his legacies until his mother-in-law removes all 
out cimy Dwelling House". 

♦'TTie Lower Norfolk County Virjginia Anti- 
quary" notes that on July 8, 1698 John Byrd and 
his wife Anne were acquitted d two separate • 
counts of being "fidsely and scandalously 
defiuned" as witches. They were awarded 100 
pounds sterling in each case. Adding an insight in 
to a later age, in 1860 Thomas Land owned 25 
slaves and a Dr. Ferebee owned 33. These 
numbers represent the latest number of slaves 
owt«d by a single person on a long list of 
residents owning or employing slaves. Most listed 
owned less than 10 with very few listed as 
emi^oyed rather than owned. 

The Princess Anne Collection is part of the 
Reference Divisioa collection located in the 
Bayside Area Ubmy buading. tt is available to 
the public Monday through Thursday from 9:30 
a.m. imtil 9 p.m. and on Friday and Saturday from 
9:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. In addition, tlw fecility is 
open on Sunday fixxn 1 p.m. until 5 p.m. from 
Oddwr through May. Contents of the collection 
are acquired through purchase and ami private 
donations. WUk donations (rf materials concern- 
ing all perkxk of Prmoess AniM County history 
are welcomed, the ability to accept materials 
«*idi require special treatment forjmservatioo 
purposes, or special storage, is limited by the 
preseitt space and fiual^. Tte constriK^on (rfthe 
Ceittial library fedUty will allow siMce aiKi 
apimjpriate fedlitks for an e^qianded Primxss 
Anne colfection iiKluding tlM collection of original 
photograi^is and manuscripts. 



What's On Your Mmd? Let Us Know! 

The Virginia Betxh Sun wektmies ai^ encoura^s lettws to tl« editor <mi any and aU Virginia Be»di 
issues, as weO as any other issues, qi^tions or concerns affecting the weU being of the Virginia Beach 
commumty. Utters should be typed, double spaced and indude the writers name, address and tdephone 
number. Mail letters to The Virginia Beach Sun, 138 S. Roaemont Road, Virginia Beach. Va. 234S2 



The Virginia B^ch Sun ^ 

Ua Somih RosenoBt Road, Virgliris BcKh, V«. 23^2 Phone (804) 486-3430 
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Vir3inia Beach Happeninss This Week 



Virginia Beach Sun, February i3, 1983 3 

Send yoar happenings to The Virginia 
Beach Sva, 138 S. RiMemont Road, 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 



Wednesday 



Ai¥lllC 

Thc^Womcn of Wesleyan will present a Benefit 
Fashion Show and Luncheon on the campus of 
Virginia Wesleyan Collie at 10:30 a.m. on Wed- 
nesday, Feb. 23, in the college gymnasium. 

Reserved tickets may be obtained by sending a 
checli for $3 per ticlcct to the Alumni Office, 
Virginia Wwleyan College, Wesleyan Drive, Nor- 
folic, VA 23S02. Checlcs should be made payable 
to the Women of Wesleyan. Ticlcets will also be 
available at the door. 

The Fashion Show, presented by the Clothes 
Closet, will be followed by a "finger buffet" lun- 
cheon which is included in the price of the ticket. 

For further informationc all the college Alumni 
Office at 461-3232, ext. 287. 

Spoon Mvor At Konptvlllo 

"Spoon River Anthology" will be presented by 
the Performing Arts Unit of the Virginia Beach 
Department of Parks and Recreation on Feb. 23, 
24, 2S and 26 and 8 p.m. and on Feb. 27 at 3 p.m., 
at the kempsville Playhouse located in the Va. 
Beach Recreation Center /Kempsville. 

Tickets are only $2. Reservations are suggested 
and may be made by calling 493-1892. 

Aging Co ni ni H too M oot i ng Sot 

The Mayor's Committee on Aging will meet on 
Wednesday, Feb. 23 at 2 p.m. in room 236, City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center. 

Windsor Woods Notts PlioM 

"Blue Dashiki" and "Whistle for Willie" will 
make up a one-half hour film program for 
children three to 12 years of age <m Wednesday, 
Feb. 23 at 4 p.m. in the Windsor Woods Area 
Library in Virginia Beach. Members of the family 
are invited to participate with the children in the 
film program. Children and parents may learn 
more about the films by calling the library 340- 
1043. 

MasdaClvbiioota 

The Mazda RX-7 Club of Tidewater, will hold 
its monthly meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 23, at 
7:30 p.m. in the customer service lounge of the 
' Pembroke Mazda Dealership, Virginia Beach. 

The club will sponsor "How to do it to your 
RX-7" on Feb. 27, at 1 p.m. This event is designed 
to teach you how to tune, maintain, and modify 
(if you want) your RX-7. Refreshments will be 
served. 

For further information, contact Clyde Hill, 
463-3066. 

Thursday 



The Virginia Beach Community Services Board 
will meet on Thursday, Feb. 24 at noon in Suite 
218, conference, room, Pembroke Six. 



Auditions for the seniors citizens group "Go- 
Round" will be held on Thursday, Feb. 24 at the 
Kempsville Recreation Cento* at 2 p.m. Call 49S- 
1892 for more information. 




Urtinot SIngors in Vn. Boocli 

The Meistersingers, student choir of Ursinus Virginia Beach, during the 1 1 service on Sunday, 

College, will perform at Lynnhaven Colony March 6. 



Congregational Church, 2217 Great Neck Road, 



The public is welcome to attend. 



Friday 

Nostalgia Niglit At Pavilion 

A Commodore Chorus Night, "Call It 
Nostalgia" will be held on Friday and Saturday, 
Feb. 25 to 26 at the Pavilion. 

Tax Nolp For Soniors 

Tax preparation assistance for senior citizens 
will be given on Friday, Feb. 25 from! to 4 p.m. 
at the Bow Creek Recreation Center. Call 463- 
0505 for more information. 

Bingo In Komptviilo 

A bingo night will be held on Friday, Feb. 25 
from 8 to 9 p.m. at the Kempsville Recreation 
Center. 

Saturday 

Jonior Nigii Bands Port omi 

The 6th grade and 7th grade all-city bands' ac- 
tivities have been rescheduled for the weekend of 
Feb. 25-26, at Brandon Junior High School. The 
activities were cancelled last weekend because of 
inclement weather. 

Rehearsals will be held on the evening of 
Friday, Feb. 25, and for much of the day on 
Saturday, Feb. 26, until 7:45 p.m. The two bands 
will then present a concert beginning at 8 p.m. 

The public is invited to the concert; there is no 
admission charge. 



Sunday 



City Plans Gnmos Gala 

The Parks and Recreation Department will 
sponsor a Games Gala, which includes bridge, 
pinochle and card tricks. Tournaments of 
pinochle and "party bridge", meaning the play is 
Jor fun and not for points, begins at 2 p.ni. At 3 
p.m., a workshop will be conducted on card 
tricks. For further information, call the Depar- 
tment of Parks and Recreation at 467-4884. 



MlcOoiioo To Portorm 

Lewis McGehee, a Chesapeake native son, but a 
Beach favorite for years, will appear in concert 
Sunday, Feb. 27 at 9 p.m. at Laverne's at Seventh 
Street and Atlantic Avenue. For further infor- 
mation call 428-6836 ■ 

Monda y 

Logai Socrotarios Moot 

The Virginia Beach Legal Secretaries Assoc- 
iation will conduct its regular monthly dinner 
meeting on Monday, Feb. 28 at 6 p.m. 

This meeting will be held at Valle's Steak 
House, 4616 Virginia Beach Boulevard, Virginia 
Beach. Phillip R. Farthing, Esquire will speak on 
estate plan ning. 

Cavaliors' Bond Poronts Moot 

Parents of students in the Princess Anne High 



School Marching Cavalier Band will meet on 
Monday, Feb. 28 at 7:30 p.m. in the band room. 
Call 340-7838 for more information. 

City Cooncii M o ots 

Virginia Beach City Council will meet on Mon- 
day, Feb. 28 in the City Hall Building, Virginia 
Beach Municipal Center Complex. Informal 
session begins at 5:30 p.m. and formal session 
begins at 7 p.m. 

TMCA Classos Bogin 

The Virginia Beach Family YMCA will begin a 
new session of classes and programs starting 
Monday, Feb. 28. 

A comprehensive program of classes is offered 
including: swimming, life-saving, scuba, water- 
babies, gymnastics, fitness dance, karate and 
aerobics. A Triathlon clinic is featured to assist 
individuals in preparing for the local "Sandman 
TYiathlon" (1 mile swim. 20.3 mile bike race and 
6.2 mile run). 

Classes are open to youth and adults; YMCA 
members and non-members. Babysitting service 
is available. Classes are limited. Early enrollment 
is suggested. 

The Virginia Beach YMCA is located in the 
United Way Family Center, next to Mt. Trash- 
more. For registratioi and additional informatioi 
isit the YMCA or caU 499-23 11. 

Tuesday 



"Fetal Alcohol Syndrome" is the topic of a free 
lecture on Tuesday, March 1, at 12:30 p.m. in B- 
100 at the Virginia Beach Campus of Tidew ater 
Community College. 

Speaker is James Johnson, supervisor of volun- 
teers for the Virginia Beach Comprehensive Sub- 
stance Abuse Program. 

The program is free and open to the public. For 
more information, contact TCC's Student Ac- 
tivities Of fice, 427-3070, ext. 139. 



CarPoolToMarii 



The American Antiques Arts Association will 
meet on Tuesday, March 1 at 8:45 a.m. at the 
King's Grant Baptist Church to car pool to a 
special presentation by Carol Olson at the 
Mariner's Museum. 

She will speak on ship figureheads. 

Call 428-4808 for more information. 

U pcomin g 

froo Pot Caro Loctoro 

"Care of the Pregnant Pet" is the topic of a free 
pet care lecture on Wednesday, March 2, at 7:30 
p.m. in C-142 at the Virginia Beach Campus of 
Tidewater Community College. 

For more information on the lecture which is 
free and open to the public, call 428-6201 . 

Ono Acta At nrst Colonial 

The First Colonial Theatre Association has an- 
nounced the opening of its Night of One Acts. 
Opening Night will be March 3 and the plays will 
run through the night of March 4. 



On Television 



Teacher Receives 
Student's "Fantasy 



NBC Television visited 
Virginia Beach's Pem- 
brdce Meadows Elemen- 
tary Schod recently be- 
cause a student there 
requested it. 

Stephanie Lifland, a 
sixth grader, was watch- 
ing the network's dally 
afternoon prc^ram, "Fan- 
tasys," one day last faU 
and came up with an idea. 
Her teacher, Terry 
Spu;uzz8, is very food (k 
th^artoon character, 
Snoc^y. lifland reasoned 
that the ultimate fimtasy 
would be fa a giant 
Snoopy to be given to her 
teacher. 

Stephanie decided to 
write to the show's [mxlu- 
cers, asking if tluy wouU 



consider her fiantasy. In 
January, NBC called 
Stephanie to inform her 
that they would come to 
Virginia Beach and grant 
her wish. 

Last week, the show's 
host. Randy Hamilton, 
and a crew of cameramen 
and technidaiu arrived in 
the school's cafeteria for 
the presentation and 
video-taping. Principal 
Drununond Ball partici- 
pated in the brief cere- 
mony as well. 

"Fantasys" aire locally 
OD WAVY-T.V. Channel 
10, weekdays from 3 to 4 
p.m. The show featuring 
Pembrdce Meadows is 
sclwduted to air at a ]«t 
imannounced ftiture dMe. 




Pro Boxing, Kick Boxing Scheduled For March 10 



Tickets are scheduled to go on sale this week for 
an evening of professional boxing and amatuer 
kick-boxing, according to Stanley Bennett, promo- 
ter fat the event. 

Scheduled for Thursday, March 10 at Revue's, 
the fights are slated to feature four kick-boxing 
matches and four pro boxing matches. 

Mike Vaughan, match-maker few the event, said 
Virginia Beach's Ric "The Bomber" Lainhart 
(5-4) will headline the show in the main event. His 
oppcMient had not been scheduled at presstime. 
Vu-ginia Beach's Ricky Butts (1-0) will fight 
Charles Carter (5-5) of Charlottesville, Vaughwi 
said. In the opening pro match, Billy Wyatt of 
Mechanics ville will square off against Will Rankin 
of Charlottesville, Vaughan said. Filling out the 
card will be Pete "Rocky" Harris (2-4) of Virginia 
Beach against an as-yet undetermined opponent, 
Vaughan said. 

Vaughan added that he hoped to feature 
Virginia Beach's Curtis Bush in kick-boxing 



competition, Vaughan was unsure who else' he 
would schedule for kick-boxing. "We have a 
number of very talented guys were trying to pair 
up right now," he said. 

Bennett reported turning a profit during his last 
foray into boxing promoting last December. In 
two previous pronotions. Bennett said, "I lost my 
shirt." 

"I did real well at Rogues," he continued. "I 
finally found the atmosphere I wanted for pro 
boxing in Virginia Beach. Every seat is like 
ringside, there are no(^structed views, and there 
is loads of good music and pretty girls." 

Bennett added that a series ot once-a-month 
boxing events has already been scheduled for 
Rogue's through the summer. 

Tickets for the March 10 event wiU be available 
at Mary's Country Kitchen, Chi Oio's, R£«ue's 
and the Surf-Rider Resuurant, Bennett said. 
Tickets will cost $7 in advance and S8 the day of 
the show, be said. 



Lifland and Spicum 



For Outstandine Young Woman 



Beach Jaycettes Seek Nominations 



The Vagiim Beach Jaycettes are spoosoring an 
OutstamUng Young Woman Award in the Qty ci 
Wginia Beach. 

The award will be prestJAed at a hmcheoo held by 
the Jaycettes on ^pril 23. 

The Jaycettes are lookmf for woo^n from all walks of 
life who throigh their iMfd work and cfedKatkn have 
made an "outstanding" antribution to the pet^ of 
our community. 

Citizens and (»-guuzatk»M acquahtfed with gualified 
young women between tlw agn of 18 tt^36 tlrauld 



submit nominations to P.O. Box 934, Virginia Beach, 
VA 23451. 

All nominations must be received in writing by 
Friday April 9, 1983. 

Nominations should specify: nominMs' name, 
adckess, tel^one, birthday, reasons fa- nomini^ian, 
qoaUfi^tions of nominee including civk activities, 
oonipational activities, religious activities, educational 
tmckground etc. and any other pertinent information 
highlighting the ncxninee's ccxitribution to the <^xn- 
munity as "outstanding." 



Upcoming 

Concerts 

The Virginia Beach concert company. Whisper 
Concerts, Inc., has announced the following 
events: 

Sunday, Feb. 23: Chadi Maagkne at Chrysler 
Hall. 

Sunday, March 13: WUUc Nthm at Scope. 

Friday to Sunday, March 18 to 20: "ErW at 
Chrysler HaU. 

Sunday, March 27: Eari Kiigk in two 
performances at OMNI. 

T\iesday, March 29: Ton Petty at William mi 
Mary Hall. 

Friday, y^ril 1 : Jimmy Buffet at Chrysler Hall. 

Saturday, April 16: Du Fogelkcrg at William 
and Mary Hall. 

For showtimes and ticl«t information oU 
428-4452. 




Meyera 
Running 

More than 60 suppor- 
ters turned out to heai 
Virginia Boich Council- 
woman Meyera Obern- 
(k>rf announce her can- 
didacy for the Rq>ublican 
State Senate nomination, 
7th Smatorial ENstrict. 



"I know 1 pan win the 
nomination and the dec- 
tion, ' ' Obemdorf said . 

The election is in 
November. 



mmm 



mw* 



4 Virginia Bnch Sun, February 23. 1983 



Virqinia Beach Sun Hews 



Winning Isn't Everything, Beach Winners Say 



Conlinued from Page I 

Colgate's a winner, and says winning involves a 
combination of things. 

"You have to start when you're young, you have to 
be determined and you have to have a goal," G^ate 
said. "You have to be completely honest, whether 
you're dealing with feelings or with dollars. It takes 
these things to make you a winner. If you take any one 
of these things away you'll probably fail." 

Cdgate first began feeling and thinking like a winner 
while he was still a young man. He finished his naval 
service before the age of 21 and says that by then he 
had already determined he was a winner, realiang that 
he had "survived" World War II and Iwo Jima. 

"I gained a lot of self-discipline then and what I 
gained 1 carried through life. 1 started out of the Navy 
with a pickup truck and a tod box and now I'm a 
millionaire. With the Lord's blessing, I think I've made 
it through." 



**You have to be completely honest, 
whether you *re dealing with dollars or 
feelings , . . A competitive person 
lives his life inside a balloon with 
someone chasing you with a stick pin. 
The only way you^re going to win is to 
stay ahead of him,^* - Boyd Colgate 



Colgate is a competitive perscxi, which for some is a 
character trait leading to success. He describes his 
competitive edge: "A competitive person lives his life 
inside a balloon with scvneone chasing you with a 
stickpin. The only way you're going to win is to stay 
ahead of him." 4 

But competition is not necessarily thlkey to winning . 

"The key is hard work, determination and honesty; 
you have to be honest," Colgate said. "If you have to 
isolate it and bring it down to one word, it has to be 
honesty. You gain respect fa- yourself and from the 
imblic if you're honest." 

Behind every successful man or woman there has to 
be motivation. 

"It's my own self-esteem," Cdgate said. "I was a 
grown man before I ever thought about it. Most of the 
better things in life are propelled by self-esteem." 

Cdgate also says it's imp<Mtant to have friends, and 
plenty of them, to be successful, "because when ymi're 
re^y down, if you don't have friends you're out in the 
cold. There are very few successful people that don't 
have friends they can trust." 



Even though not all businesses or industries are as 
competitive as the music industry, as musician Stanley 
Oarke knows, there may be sane validity to the notion 
that the more successful you become, the more people 
want to top you. 

"That's in each person's mind," Colgate said. "The 
prey in my mind is the bubble. There's a lot of jealously 
in the world. If you are successful you have to continue 
down the road that made you successful. I've let the 
moiey I've made continue to work for me and I've kept 
working." 

The taste of victory is sweet, and failure is sour. But 
Cdgate hasn't the taste for sour things. 

"That's one thing I've never faced," he said. 
"We're winning continually now. Even in the quiet 
times, 1958 and 1960, we always enjoyed a nvx quiet 
growth. I've never had an operating loss in my 
business. Even in a recession I was a winner because I 
would tighten up." 

Colgate's success has come through "hard work, 
careful planning and honesty. I won't talk to a man I 
can't lode at eye to eye." 

^hulcy FowDfies 
Nancy Fowll»s is, among other things, the girl's field 
hockey coach at Cox High Schpd. She has been 
coaching field hockey in Virginia Beach for 10 years. 
During that time she has amassed five district, two 
regional, and two state titles. For the last two yean, 
1981 and 1982 seasons, her girls' field hockey team has 
won the disctict, regional and state titles. Last year's 
record, this past fall, was 29-0-1. Fowlkes was also 
selected by the >%ginia Beach Spots club as "Coach of 
the Year" for the 1981-'82 season. 

Fowlkes says defining winning is a lot like defining 
luck: "It's chance meeting (^portunity." 

Fowlkes has been a winner for as long as she can 
remember. 

"I don't remember ever thinking I was not a 
winner," she said. "In elementary schod I was 
academically a winner; being pretty much at the head 
of my class. I never thought of myself as being a loser. 
At college I was good at winning elections in student 
government and student activities." 

Fowlkes said hard work gives "you the chance to 
win. Without hard work you dcm't have a chance to win. 
With hard work you have the chance. Talent is a big 
part too," 

Attitude, Fowlkes said, "is real important. If you 
think you can win that's about 907o of the battle. The 
rest is hard work and talent." 

When it comes to winning, and what she would or 
would not do to win, Fowlkes is emphatic. 

"I play by the rules," she said. "I'll use the rules to 
my team's advantage. But I want to win by the bode 
and I want to make other people think I win ethically. I 






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also want to set good moral rules for my girls." 

Fowlices lilces winning because "I lil« the peqile who 
try to surround themselves mth winners. That's cme 
way to be a winner; to surround yourself with 
winners." 

*7 don't remember ever thinking I 
was not a winner , . . I never thought 
of myself as being a loser . . . I play 
by the rules. Vll use the rules to my 
team's advantage.'' - Nancy Fowlkes 



Fowlkes likes it at the t<^, noting that "it's better to 
be the hunted than the hunter. I think anyone would be 
happier that way. If you're good you like competition. 
You like to be the best." 

Fowlkes said "there is a certain pressure to continue 
to be a winner if you have the talent to do it," noting 
that she was under pressure to win the state title again 
this past &U, having 10 of her 11 players from last 
year's championship team returning. 

Ffow does a winner like Fowlkes react to losing? 

"I'm not a real good loser," she ^aid. "1 don't like to 
lose. I have a little temper and sometimes I take it out 
on the girls the next day. Losing is okay if you lose to a 
technically good team and you played as hard as you 
can. It's better losing to a good team than to a team 
which isn't. 

Winning doesn't come easy, Fowlkes said, it takes 
hard work. 

"There's pretty much work invdved with winning," 
Fowlkes commented. "I've been lucky with my friends; 
and other people make me feel good. 1 dcm't know if 
winning ever comes easy though. It's always hard work 
Ux someboi|fr™°^^ " ' — — j-— ^- 

Barbara Henley 

Virginia Beach Pungo Councilwoman Barbara 
Henley, has earned the distinction of being Virginia 
Beach's first female vice mayor. She has fought two 
contested elections for her council seat, winning each 
time. For her, winning is "being successful in an 
endeavour; maybe not getting everything you set out to 
gain, but still gaining something. You can be a winner 
and possibly lose some points; but you also gain in 
experien(x and relationships." 

Hentey, who has co-authored and published a book 
with School Board number Susan Flanigan on the 
Charity Church in Pungo, remembers that she first 
started perceiving herself as a winner in high schod as 
an academic achiever, who went on to become a schod 
teacher. 

Winning for \itx has been a very rewarding 
experience. 

"You can wia in many different ways; the behind 
'every cloud has a silver lining' aspect," she said. "I 
don't look at winning the council seat or the 



vice-mayors hip as winning but "as an opportunity which 
has come about. The experience that I've been able to 
have has allowed me such a broad range of experiences 
with the city that has been valuable to me; it broadens 
my perspective in so many ways. I'm always amazed at 
being able to go out and meet with many different 
groups. They have so many things going on that we» 
dm't realize all the work done in different areas by so 
many interesting grcHips in the city around us." 

Publicly, Henley is a pditician. But privately she 
denies being pditical or competitive. 

"No. I'm not competitive and I'm not pditical," she 
said. 

Why is she on council? 

"An interest in the city and in the future of the city," 
she said. "The opportunity presented itself for me to 
run for council." 
Henley said attitude is "all important" to winning. 

"The attitude of the person is gdng to determine 
how the person is going to conduct the race, and how 
the perscm is gdng to perceive the (xjtcome." 

Winning is important, but Henley would not sacrifice 
her personal principles in pursuit of a goal. 

"I don't see that the end justifies the means," she 
said. "I would not go to any means to win something. 
Maintaining my integrity is all important. I have to live 
with myself regardless the outcone of an electi<m." 

Henley likes to be a winner. 

"Just the psycbdogical aspect of it is that we all like 
to be successful," she said. "It's a basic human trait 
that we all like to be achievers and successful. 
Perseverance is very important; set a goal and not give 
it up." 

. '7 don 't look at winning the council 
seat or the vice-mayorship as winning 
iut as an opportunity that has come^r ^ ^ 
about . . . / would not go to any 
means to win something. Mdntainhg my 
integrity is all important. I have to live 
with myself regardless the outcome of 
an election." - Barbara Henley 

■IBHBHHlBBHiilBaaBB^i^BIBB^HH 

Hdding public office is an honor, and a big 
responsibility. Being a winner is not hard, but living up 
to people's expectaticxis sometimes is. . ^ 

"The responsibility, particularly in public office is 
the hardest part of being a winner," she said. "Feeling 
the responsibility the people have placed in you; to live 
up to that responsibility and not let the pe(vle down 
who have the confidence to elect me." 

When the occasion arises and Henley does lose 
something for which she worked hard, she said she is 
"sometimes very, very disappdnted if it was some- 
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Virginia Beach Sun, February 23, 1983 5 



Virsinia Beach Sun Hews 



Communication And Hard Work Is Important To Winning 



Continued from Pige4 

thing I felt strongly about. But wc have to move on to 
other things." 

LoubJoiMs 
Louis R. Jones became mayor at a time when coundl 
was loc^ng for stability after the previous mayoral 
election was marred by dissention. controversy, and 
multiple ballots. Jo^s, who owns a line of funeral 
homes, was elected to public office daSs first bid, and. 
was then voted with relative ease by his peers to be 
maycff. 

How does he describe a winner? 

"ftevailing over the odds," he said. "Nobody really 
knows when they enter into a contest all of the factors 
involved in winning or losing. Only by the actions in the 
course of the coitest, and by the opponents as they fell, 
will the winner prevail." '* 

The key to winning, Jones said, is a combination of 
"good planning, hard work and an ability to 
ccmmunicate. 

"I figured out that if 1 wanted to be a winner I had to 
do some planning and be willing to do a lot of work. As 
a result, when 1 was in cdlege my grades improved and 
so did my perspective of life." 

Jones is a competitive man and willing to commit 
himself to winning. 

"I would wOTk hard to be a winner," he said, "but I 
would not break the law to be a winner, or do anything 
immoral. I would try to use all my Abilities to be a 
winner; be willing to commit whatever resources I have 
at my access." 

Winning is impcn-tant to Jcmes but not necessarily the 
ultimate goal. 




"I don't think winning is necessarily the goal," he 
said. "It's what you want to win that's jhe joal. 1 
wanted to win an election to be on city council. Just 
running to win is not the goal. That's a shallow goal." 

Jones is a winner, and now that he's at the top of city 
government he would hope that anyone who would 
consider hunting him (k>wn "like prey" would think of 
him as a worthy adversary. 

"There may be some pet^le who want to be a 
winner, or to achieve or set a goal m the basis of what 
someone else has achieved," Jones said. "I woul d hope 
iBflHHHBHHBH^IH^H^HII^HHHHHHH 

*7 would work hard to be a winner, 
but I would not break the law ... or 
do anything immoral, I would try to use 
all my abilities to be a winner; be willing 
to commit whatever resources I have at 
my access . . . / don*t think winning 
is necessarily the goal, it*s what you 
want to win that *s the goal,** - Louis 
Jones 

that if someone wanted to compete against me they 
would consider me a formidable adversary." 

Being a winner in the public circle of politics is not 
much more different for Jones than working in 
business. In that respect, winning is easy. _^ 

"I don't consider it hard," he said. "I'm used to 
meeting and talking with people. Being mayor is not 



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much different than being in the business I'm m. I 
don't worry about somebody trying to shoot me down. I 
just try to do the best job I can." 

JcHies has won much more than he has lost, but when 
he does lose he doesn't let it bother him. 

"I can take it pretty well," he said. "N(*ody wins all 
the time. I've been fortunate that I've been able to win 
most of the things I've set out for. But when you do lose 
it's over and you move on to the next thing and don't 
worry about the past. I've never been devastated to lose 
something." 

Attitude is impOTtant to winning, as is listening and 
understanding. 

"Attitude is extremely important to winning," Jcmes 
said. "You have to have a positive attitude, an 
aggressive attitude and an objective attitude. You have 
to be able to listen and understand what pec^le are 
saying. If you don't you can't respond. 

Jones said he first started perceiving himself as a 
winner at the age of 19, when he was elected president 
of his cdlege fraternity. 

"If you work hard, someone ncxninates you," he 
said. 

Jones is admittedly "very competitive," which may 
or may not have had any bearing on the number of 
different local and national organizations on which he 
has served as an officer or been a member. 
Paul Sciortino 

Paul Sciortino, known locally as "The Street 
Sweeper," has a reputation fcr being tough in the 
courts, and also as an all around intelligent and sensible 
man. A former F.B.I, agent, Sciortino resigned his job 
as an assistant commonwealth's attorney in Virginia 
Beach and swept his former boss, 14 year incumbent 
Andre Evans out of office. In the Nov. 1981 election, out 
of about 50,000 votes cast in the commcmwealth's 
attorney's race, Sciortino won by better than 7,000. 

ScicM-tino defmes winning as the ability to "achieve 
the goals you set fw yourself; it doesn't necessarily 
mean winning cases. You can set goals fu' your office." 

Sciortino first perceived himself as a winner in 
elementary schod. He skipped two grades, spending 
only one week in kindergarten and skipped the fourth 
grade entirely. He also played athletics and was an 
exceptional speller. 

"I just wanted to be an achiever early," he said. 

The key to winning Sciortino said, is "basically, 
setting goals and determination, working hard, 
concentratiOT of what you want, where ymx are gdng, 
and what you want to do." 

"Attitude," said Sciortino, "is very important. If you 
perceive yourself to be a loser, you're gdng to be a 
kxer. If you perceive yourself as a wiimer then you'll be 
a winner. You have to work from that aspect." 

To most winners, winning is very impcrtant. It's also 
important to Sciortino, but he wiU not take shortcuts to 



"I like to win but I will not vidaTe ray own 
principles," he said. "I think you can lose and still win; 
do the very best you can; give it your best shd and still 
lose. If you take shortcuts you are cheating. You have to 
win fair and square." 

SciOTtino, while in the Navy, gained all his 
promdions on time or ahead d time. He took a fleet 
officer's exam with 4,000 dher men and placed in the 
top 10 percent. He was elected president of his senior 
class at St. Jdin's Cdlege in New York, and was also 
«ie of the founders and first president of the cdlcge's 
historical society. 

''Attitude is very important. If you 
perceive yourself as a loser, you're 
going to be a loser. If you perceive 
yourself as a winner you*re going to be 
a winner . , , if you take shortcuts 
you are cheating. You have to. win fair 
and square,** - Paul Sciortino 



Sciortino is very good at his work, and finds it more 
challenging if dhers are trying their best to beat him in 
the courtroom. 

"I see attomies that want to win," he said. "Mast 
attornies want to win for their own satisfaction, like 1 
do. I do my preparation and they do feel I'm a 
formidable adversary; they're a forirfiidable adversary 
too. 1 enjoy trying a case against a good lawyer on the 
other side better than a lawyer who is nd prepared." 

Sciortino likes his image of being a winner, his ^ 
prosecution record for the city is over 90 percent. 

"I don't find winning too difficult to accept at all," he 
said. "I find it enjoyable. The job carries a lot of 
responsibility; a Id of weighty decisions. That goes 
along with all of my assistants. I doa't feel being at the 
top creates any prdjlems fw me or anyone else. Once 
you're a winner your record speaks for itself. Nobody 
wins all the time, but that's something you have to 

accept." 

How does Sciortino react to losing? 

"I dcm't like it. It bdhers me," he said. "It makes 
me wonder if there was something more I should have 
or could have done. But it doesn't stay with me. It gives 
me pause to think, but I put it behind me. If I make a 
mistake I make sure I don't make it again." 

Sciortino said he has to work to be a winner and still 
works hard at it. 

"I work hard and diligently. I keep a winning attitude 
and get as much out of a case as I can. It's a lot of hard 
work." 



VjO OO Continued from Page I 

It has been well over a year since Go Go was last employed in a reporting 
capacity at WVAB radio. Still, she wouldn't think of skipping a meeting. "I 
love being part of this city and I have to keep active, so I keep on going," she 
said. The members of the city's press corps give her rides most of the time, but 
city councilmen and school board members have also been known to give Go 
Go a lift to and from her apartment at the occanfront Mayflower Building. 

Go Go graduated from Randolph Macon College in Lynchburgh, where her 
father. Dr. Benjamin William Arnold, was a professor emeritus of history. 
The year was 1923, and Go Go used her English history and composition 
degree to become a high school teacher. She soon turned her attentions to 
nursing, however. Just weeks before she was to be capped, though, she 
married a young military man, Richard Warren Barnes, and her career was 
put on hold. Nine months and two days later, their son Richard, Jr. was born. 

Several decades ensured, and Go Go tended to the chore of being a wife and 
mother. With the advent of the 1960's and her arrival in Virginia Beach, Go 
Go again turned her attention to English composition. She landed a job at The 
Virginia Beach Sun where she earned a host of distinctions, including awards 
for photography and writing from the Virginia Press Women Association and 
the National Federation of Press Women. Among her one-time editors were 
Carl Cahill, husband of current Sun reporter Lee Cahill, and Joe Lowenthal, 
the present director of public information for the Virginia Beach school 
system. '* 

Go Go moved on to become a radio news reporter for WCMS and, 
ultimately, WVAB. She accumulated more than 21 years in covering Virginia 
Beach's city hall, schools and courts. 

"The reason I continued to go today is because Virginia Beach is the most 
fascinating and interesting city," she said. "The City Council is full of the' 
most dedicated people I've ever seen. Now, I know politics makes strange bed- 
fellows, and I've yet to m^ a politician who wasn't in it for himself. But, for 
the most part, Virginia Beach's politicians are sincere and honest." 

Go Go is working on a book about her 21 years of residence at the 
Mayflower, tentatively titled, "Mayflower Madness-It's Hdme Sweet 
Home." "I've never been happier in my life than when I'm here," she noted. 

Go Go is also the receptionist at the Gallilee Episcopal Church/ where she 
once taught Sunday school. Additionally, she is a member of the Pi Beta Phi 
Fraternity, and is a former member of the American Association of University 
Women. "I hope to begin playing tennis again this summer," she said adding, 
"my passion, though, is baby sitting." 

Please send your nominations for citizen-of-the-week to The Virginia Beach 
Sun , 138 S. Rosemont Road, Virginia Beach, VA 23452. 



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PA Women 
Host Art Show; 
Award Ribbons 
To Members 

The GFWC Princess 
Anne Woman's Club of 
Virginia Beach recently 
held it's annual February 
creative arts and crafts 
show at the Thalia United 
Methodist Church. Mrs. 
J. Alfonse Fricllo, Mrs. 
Shirley Todd and Mrs. 
Blanche Addison were 
judges. They selected club 
members for blue ribbons 
in the following 
categories: 

Christmas decorations, 
Mrs. Martha S. Walker, 
Crocheting, Mrs. Mae F. 
Brumley and Mrs. Earl 
Duval, each two blues, 
and Mrs. Ian Hamilton 
and Mrs. A. R. Bunting, 
each one blue; Knitting, 
Mrs. T. E. Leesnitzcr two 
blues, and Mrs. Charles 
A. Miller and Mrs. M. F. 
Camp one blue; Sewing, 
Mrs. Arthur L. Richard- 
son one blue, and Mrs. H. 
M. Joyce two blues; 
Weaving, Mrs. Richard 
Tinney, two blues; Oil 
Painting. Mrs. Robert J. 
Boyd, one blue; Water- 
color, Mrs. Martha S. 
Walker, one blue; 
Quilting, Mrs. Martha 
Hunt, one blue; 
Miscdianeous, Mrs. John 
E. Nixon, Mrs. Lewis 
Rightmier and Mrs. A. L. 
Richardson, each one 
blue. 

A covered dish lun- 
cheon followed with 45 
club members and guests 
attending. Guests included 
Mrs. Orian Rieley, 
president of the 
Chesapeake Beach 
Woman's Club; and 
Ocean Park Woman's 
Club president, Mrs. 
Norman Barna. 

Mrs. Martha S. Walker 
and Mrs. Robert J. Boyd 
y/ere program chairmen. 

CaU 428-5567 for more 
inftHination. 

"Hope ever teQs m to- 
morrow will be better." 
* Tlbullii'! 



■■ 



■■■■ 






■■■■ 



hijf-MJw 1 1- 1 II ii*mwwpi^»^ 



T 



■•^^••■p 



^immmm 



f^mm^mi^fm^mmmmmmmmmmmKmmmmmmmmmm 



immm^ 



6 Virginia Beach Sun, February 23, 1983 . 



* • 



Yirsinia Beach Siin Hews 




Charlie Chapi|n, a menbcr of Rock Church, points to Pungo's "Beuiah Land.' 

Borou g h Parade 
In Pungo, Food For The Hungry 



Hie Roclc,Qiurch. which specializes in nourish- 
ing hungry souls, is glaring up this spring to 
launch a nourisbinent program vof a different 
variety. 

The project is called "Beuiah Land." 

Located in Pqngo off Indian River Road about a 
mile and a half from I^kxth Landing Road near the 
borders of the I^ncess Anne Borough and the *' 
City of Chesapeake, there lies m optn field of 
79.1 acres called "Beuidh Lata." On this land, 
church ofiftaals are inviting any and everyoie who 
wishes to cone out and farm. And the church will 
even provide the seed. . ^ 

Something for nothing? In a way. Jhe Rock 
Church adheres to Biblical Scripture which, calls 
fcH-, amcmg other things, the feeding of the 
hungry. "We know that God wants mj^o this, 
so we do," says Bill Side bottom, a spokesman far 
the church. 

"The process is really very simple," says 
Sidebottom. All one needs to do is to apply for a 
plot of land to tend by calling Jim Cacuzza, the 
church's administrator at 49S-190S. 

The catch? "All we ask is that the people give 
back to the diurch fO percent of^nything they 
reap," says Sidebottom. "In other words, if they 
grow 100 pounds of vegetables, we ask that they 
give 10 pounds back to the church so that we can 
give it to othefil." 

Will there be an effort to recruit new members 
to the 3,500-member congregation? "You're 
definitely going to bear about the church and the 
Ln-d by being around other Church members, 
there's no question about it," says Sidebottom. 
"But we won't be going out of our way to recruit 
people." 

Sidebottom said there will be room on the land, 
"fa- thousands upon thousands of people" to 
farm. Thus far, however, very few have applied 
to farm there. "Obviously there is a relatively 
low number of people in Tidewater who think we 



are serious about this thing," he says. 

Sidebottwn assures that Rock Church is indeed 
sertous. He adds that the church will supply all 
the necessary, farming tools and will even provide 
transportation for those who need it. "I can't 
understand why more people haven't taken us up 
on this," Sidebottom sighs. 







Pungo is located io the soathcast comer of 
Vli^nia Beach, bordered by the UMkwater 
Borough to the west, by the Princess Anne 
Borough to the north, by tlie Atlantic Ocean to the 
east, and by North CaroUaa to the south, Pungo 
has an estimated popahtloa of 900. 




Padilla Named 'Outstanding' 



By Fred L. Lingad 
Special To The Sun 
The Sales and 
Marketing Executives of 
Tidewater recently presen- 
ted awards to 31 outstand- 



ing persons in the areas of 
sales and marketing, in- 
cluding Virginia peach 
resident Quirina P. 
PadiUa. 
Padilla, a native of the 



Philippines, is employed 
by SeabCMUtl Realty Cor- 
poration of Virginia 
Beach. The ceremonies 
were held recently at the 
Omni Intonational Hotel 



Voice Of The People 

(This poll was conducted at Lynnhaven Mall) 



Who May Be Responsible For 
The Oceanf ront Arsons? 




'Tve heard rumors 
there may be people 
trying to collect Insuiwt' 
ce money. I hate to see 
people having to risk 
their lives over some- 
thing as foolish as arson; 
it's senseless. The people 
doing this must be 
psychos or something. " 
Larry Gardner 
Maintenance man 
Two-year resident 



"It could be kids. A 
lot of kids are respon- 
slNe for starting forest 
fires, so It could be that 
they are behind all the 
ivsons at the Beach. A 
lot oftlnus, kids are just 
playing around and they 
don't mean any reirt~ 
harm. It Is very stupid, 
though, and it makes me 
mad." 

MicjielleColosi 

Restaurant employee 

One-year resident 



'7 hate to be 
suspicious, but It sounds 
like It could be the 
owners; they haven't 
been making a lot of 
money, you know. It has 
to be that or somebody 
falling asleep white 
they're smoki/tg. Instead 
of jailing arsonists, they 
should make them go 
along with theflranen to 
see the havoc they've 
wrought. " 

Mrs. George R. Eastman 

Homemaker 

Six-year resident 



•7 think It's the 
owners, and I bet they're 
doing It fw the btsuiwi- 
ce. I've heard that cer- 
tain people who owned 
the property ware not 
too reputable. If that's 
the case, that they're 
doing It for the money, 
then they are greedy 
people. I know the 
buildings ore old and 
theu things happm, but 
as many as have been 
happening lately, it's got 
to be anon. 

Stac^ Fletcher 

Waitress 

Seven-year resident 



Student Creative Writing 

The following works are by students at Indian Lakes 
Dabney. 

The Worst Place... 

The worst place I've ever been . . .was a 
graveyard where my dad's ceremony for his death 
was held. You could see them take off the flag and 
the Marines fired to thank him for protecting their 
country. You could smell the nice fresh air and the 
essence that told you he was gone. You just wan- 
ted to open the coffln and hug him, but you knew 
he would not move. People would cry and weep. 
You felt sad but good, that he has gone to the 
Lord's place. 

By Mike Tnweti, li, loa of Erakc TickoU. MVie k a flwIeBl 
ia Mn. Aagda MllcbcH'f ^tk grade elaii. 



Elementary School. The principal b Mrs. Olivia 

Haiku 

Going to the beach riding in a great big wave 
wrecking wh^n it breaks. 

By Joe McPkwIm, 9, mm of Sle?e and Patty kfePhcctcn. 
Mn. Lyra Sdlaer'i fowth i 



Love 

Nice, beautiful, kissing, hugging, laughing, 
loving, happy, joy, feeling 



i^ McpM Tcftta, 9, Om^aet of DavM aai Kathy Tticha. 
MlH Sandra BokcrtoM's foarth gndc dav. 



Bow Creek 
To Host 
Dance For 
Handicapped 

A dance for physically 
and mentally handicapped 
people will be held March 
19 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
at the Bow Creek 
Recreation Center, 3427 
Clubhouse Road, Virginia 
Beach. The dance will be 
sponsored by the Virginia 
Beach Department of 
Parks and Recreation and 
CLASP (Gtizens Loving 
All Special People). 



Transportation is 
available from your area; 
however, for planning 
l»uposes, call Joy Stinnett 
at 499-7619 weekdays 
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
before March 10. 



Padilla 




MICHAEL F. 
FASAN ARO, JR. 

Attor^y 
AlLaw 

461-6121 

5 Kogcr Executive Center 

SUITE 220 
Norfolk, Va. 23502 



Cnaton mifin4iK»%oltiiunty, hw cost 

OFFSET HEWSPAPOS 
And CIRCULARS 

aMf^oirtsirvfcts. 

BYERLY PUBLICATIOHS 

UK ^7-MZO Far HatMaa 





BevFulk 

Announces 
The Opening Of 

B. B. Fulk 

Optical Company 



5847-B Poplar HaU Drive 

Norfolk. Virgiilia, 23502 
(Beside Military Circle - hsioss From L^^ts) 

Phone 461-3515 



I^ Optidan Ray-fttf Magnlflera 



CARRIER, 
HELP! 

2 Reasons m^ 

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Cooling NOW! 

1. Savings 



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cooling costs. 

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Find out how much a Carrier heat pump can save you. 



547-4444 

AMPMOR ELECTRIC CORP 

123 Wayne Ave. * Great Bridge > Chesapeake 




Virginia Beach Sun, February 23", 1983 7 



Virsinia Beach City Council ByLMChiu 



Beach Council Actions 




Jolm A. Bmm 
Blackwatcr 



Naacy A. Creech 
AI-Lu|C 



M.llMlqr 



HaroM IMiriMkcr 
Al-Lufc 



H.JackJM^lM* 
Lyanhavca 



L<MiiR.Joi 
tayiidc 






Robert G. JoMs 
Al-Lar|e 



W.H.IUlckta,ni 
ViriiaiaBMCfe 



ilchaS.McCluM 
PriaceiaAuc 



J. Hnrjr McCoy, Jr. 
Kcnpevillc 



Mcyem Obcrmdorf 
Al-Lar|c 



Meeting Cancelled: Washington's Birthday 



Council Rejects Idea 



Beach Park Plan Scrapped 



Virginia Beach's latest flirtation with an amusement 
park was shOTt-lived. The familiiBS that live near the 
pr(^osed "family amusement park" didn't want it. 

The problem with amusement parks in Vurginia 
Beach is that there apparently doesn't seem to be a 
right place for them. 

Hans to erect one in North Wginia Beach on a site 
ihdjiding the city's dd incinerate site have been 
kilwd, as was an earlier courtship cS the city to put one 
in at the south end of the Beach Borough. 

Recently Council, by a vote of 9-1, nixed the latest 
prc^osal in denying Odoual-Laskin Associates, a 
Virginia Limited Partnership, a conditional use permit 
for a park and an arcade building on a 30-acre parcel 
along the west side of First Cd(xiial Road, south of 
Laskin Road in. the Lynnhaven Borough. Councilman 



Robert G. Jones dissented. Councilwoman Nancy 
Qeech was absent. 

Principals of Cd<Miial-Laskin are C.H. Byler, Stanley 
Willner, Edward S. Garcia, Sr., and Frank YcHing. 

The Plaiming Oxnmission had recommended appro- 
val by a vote of 6-4 and the Plaiming Department also 
found the project compatible with the Comprehensive 
plan. 

-The opposition came from Laskin Village i^mrtments 
and Eastwood Villa Apartments which would be across 
Village Road from the park. 

Council also denied the request of Joseph P. Waldo, 
attorney for the applicants, to cmtinue the hearing 
until March 7. He said that the applicants needed the 
time to prepare a site plan and rendering. Approxi- 
mately 20 area residents objected to a deferral. 



Council On Television? 
Idea Killed By Tie Vote 



Virginia Beach citizens who want to see Qty Council 
in action will have to continue to make the trek to City 
Hall at Princess Anne Courthouse f(X the opportunity. 

Any intentions Council members may have had to^ 
visit constitutuents in their homes via cable TV have 
been nipped in the bud. 

A tie vote (5-5) at council's last meeting killed an 
ordinanqe which would have permitted cablecasting of 
Council sessions for the remainder of the fiscal year - 
that is, until July 1. Council was to consider a 
continuation of the project in the upcoming operating 
bugct. 

The cost for the rest of the year would have been 
$10,380, $3600 of which would be a (Xie-^fme expense 
for lighting and sound improvements, f 

Mayor Lxxiis R. Jones said he was vqKing against the 
prc^Kcal because the city would be "spending money 
we don't need to spend." 

n,€ity Manager Thomas H. Muehlenbeck pointed out 
in his letter to Council that the money would be taken 
from the franchise fees the city received from Cox 
Cable TV. The city has budgeted $125,000 from these 
fees for 1982-83, but expects to receive $375,000. Next 
year, he estimated the city will receive about $400,000 
in fees. 

The city staff sees cable TV as the most cost-effective 
and reliable way to reach the public. He said that public 
hearings are effective, but attendance is often sparse. 
The local media may CMivcy local concerns, the staff 
maintains, but there is no way for the city to control 
either the timing or the content of the meetings. 
Mailing out infOTmaticMi is cumbersome and as the rise 
in postal rates ccxitinues, costly. 

Tlie position paper recently presented by Muehlen- 
beck also pants out that emergency infcx-maticm can be 
broadcast rapidly and accurately over the cable system. 
Print information concerning city services can be 
programmed up to 24 hours a day ~ things such as the 
agenda for Qty Council and Planning Conunission 
meetings. The public service channel also can carry 
profiles of city services, training tapes, and the ability 
to address employees in outlying work stations. 

Muehlenbeck estimates that the cost of minimal 
service, in co(^ration with the schod administration, 
could cost an estimated $67,052 a year for daily 
programming. This would invdve 20 hours per month 
of live and taped video segments of council meetings, 
employment infomatioi series, interviews with city/ 
state officials, training tapes and profiles of city 
services, as well as material provided by and for the use 
of public schools. The remainder of the programming 
would consist of character-generated print information 
concerning city and school services and upcoming 
events. A staff person would be provided by Cox and 



the equipment would be provided by Cox. 

A second level of service, including an additional 
cable tedinician, would cost $108,166.87 a year. 

A third level which provides fw more sophisticated 
equipment would cost $132,031.87 a year. 

Ill comparison, Muehlenbeck said that the city has 
budgeted $253,004 fw public information programs. 

Muehlenbeck suggested using part of the current 
three percent franchise fee received by the city ex 
placing an additional one percent fee to cover the cost. 
This would have to be approved by the franchise and 
the FCC. 

Muehlenbeck pointed out that over 50,000 house- 
hdds in Virginia Beach have access to CATV, while 
Councihnan John A. Baum, noted that Blackwater will 
not be receiving the service at all. 

Baum has also emphasized possible misuse of cable 
by political hopefuls. 

Councilman Jack Jennings said that while he had 
reservations about spending money, he thought that 
Cablecasting would provide Council with a unique 
communication medium. He said it was incumbent 
upcm Council to improve the co^imunication with the 
constituents. "I'm going to vote for this because I really 
believe any problems wer have with this city are from a 
lack of communication." 

Councihnan Harold Ifcichober mentioned the 
$100,000 a year in reoccuring expenses plus the 
inflatiOT rate. Also, he said, the cost of cablecasting 
each council session would be $2,000 which could be 
used for other things. 

He added that the cost will be mitigated by reducing 
other forms of communication. 

Vice Mayor Barbara Henley said that the strongest 
advantage the city wiU have is the opportunity to try out 
cablecasting for the remainder of the* year before 
making a decision to continue. She said that everyone 
could not be forced to loc* at TV but pec^le are mwe 
likely to lot* at TV than they are to read a mailing. 
Jennings moved to approve the ordinance. 
Councihnan Robert G. Jones seconded the motion. 
Votmg against the ordinance were Baum, Heischober, 
Mayor Jcmes, W.H. Kitchin III and Reba McQanan, 
Councilwoman Nancy Creech was absent. 

Qty Atnimey Dale Bimson said that Council can 
reconsider the item at any time. 

Heischober said that his prd)lem was that a 
troublesome budget is coming up but that the time has 
come tot better communications. He suggested that 
Cox come up with a package to help out financially at 
least to the end of the year. 
Mayor Jones said that the public was initially for the 

cablecasting but when they found out they would be the 

ones to pay, they were against ii. ' ■ - 



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•If I Was Mayor . . .' 

Focus On Natives 

Too much city governmental energy is being 
expended upon tourists, and not enough on 
residents. 

That is the assessment of Tim Knapp, a senior 
at Green Run High Schod and a lifelcmg resident 
of Virginia Beach. The 18-year old senior thinks it 
is time something was done fw the benefit <rf the 
locals. 

"If 1 was maycw, the first thing I'd wwk on is 
the parking at the oceanfiront," he said. "There's 
never anypUux fw them to park in the 
summertime, and when there is, they have to pay 
for it. I think they should provide free parking for 
residents. 

"I'd also do something about the landscaping," 
Knapp continued. "I'd get rid of some of those 
trashy buildings. I like the idea of a shopping 
center on the oceanfront like Norfdk's Waterside. 




Knapp 



Dr. Hulbert J. Kanter, M.D. 

Announces Proven 

Cryosurgical free/e 

Technique Itir 



REDUCED PAIN 
HEMORRHOIDECTOMY 



Hubert J, Kanter, M,D,, F.A.CS, 

Chesapeake Medical Building - 205 
(Behind Ch^^teak* G^ia-iU HoipUal) 

200 Medical Park way 

Chesapeake^ Virginia, 23320 



547-9128 



Goldwater Bill May Void 
City's Franchise With Cox 

Franchise agreements of the Qty of Virginia Beach 
with Cox Cable TV and Resort Satellite Communica- 
tions would be voided under a bill proposed by Senator 
Barry Gddwater. Tlie bill would dramatically cut back 
state and local authority over cable and prdiibit the 
esublishment and enforcement of most regulatory 
requirements, Qty Manager Thomas H. Muehlenbeck 
said. 

Qty Council recently approved a resolution opposing 
the legislation. 



Clarification 

In last week's story on the city council and school 
board, the word "bu(i^et" was accidently omitted from 
one of the sentences. The sentence should have read 
"... which in 1982 controll^ $113,861,812 of the 
city's total $264,355,295 budget ..." 



rx 



PUNBO BICTRIC 

SERVICE 
(804) 721-3839 



Roidratial Wiring - New Homes & Additions 
El«nric Heat & Power Savers 
Anteima & Intercom Systems 
Central Vacuum Installations 

Systems Prewiring 

Telephone Wiring 



High Constables To Go? 

Virginia Beach Qty Council will ask Govemw 
Charles Robb to amend or veto House Bill 842 which 
would in effect eliminate the office of High Constable in 
Virginia Beach. 

The bill, which passed the House and has been 
reported from the Senate with amendmenU, removes 
the language tying high consubles fees to sheriffs' 
fees. As amended the bill only applies to Norfolk and 
would leave the Virginia Beach High constable unable 
to charge any fees whatsoever. The Wgh Qmstable's 
office is supported by fees which it charges which are 
higher than sheriffs fees for serving papers. 

Council voiced opposition to 842 during a recent work 
session and at the same time supported Senate Bill 148 
which would raise all of the sheriffs' fees. 

David G-ochmal, assistant to the city manager, tdd 
Council that at this point the only option left for the city 
is to ask the governor to veto or amend the 842. 

Councihnan Robert G. Jones commented that the city 
maybe pursuing a lingering battle to keep the high 
ccmstable's office. "I wonder whether we have reached 
the p«nt where we can yield," he said. 

Coimcihnan W.H. Kitchin ID said that he did not 
know why the city was included in the bill. He said 
there is a philosophical difference of opinion between 
the city and its representatives to the General 
Assembly. 

Mayor Louis R. Jaies pointed out that attorneys pay 
the high consuble for serving papers. By eliminating 
the high constable, "sombody's just eliminating one of 
the costs of doing business." 

The high coosuble is appdnted by Couwdl while the 
sheriffs is a constitutional office, elected by the 
people. Functions of both offices overlap and in most 
Virginia localities the high constable's office has been 
eUminated. 

In addition to deciding to send the letter to the 
Governor, Council also went on record in opposition 
three other bills before the General Assembly, all of 
which would nibble away at the powers of localities. 
They we: 

House Bill 457. Current law allows localities the 
option <rf paying le^ fees and expenses of sheriffis 
resulting from charges of which he is subsequently 
acquitted. The bill as amended would allow the sheriff 
to petition the circuit court to require the locality to pay 
aU of his legal fees and expenses. 

Senate Bill 338. This requires localities as a part «rf 
any Workmen's Qxnpensation awwd to furnish 
wheelchairs, bedsi(k lifts and adjustable beds to the 
claimant as prescribed by a physteian and to make 
certain modificaticyu to the claimant's home if found to 
be necessary for his tealth and safety. 



PRiNTiN 



0^;i Subscribe ro 
The Sun 
486-3430 




MM 



■■la 






■■i 



■■HH 



-t- -i W .J. ,-f 



immmi^mmm^ 



•^niHW 



mmmammm^mmmmmmmmm 



8 Virginia Beach Sun, Feteuary 23. 1983 




"X 



The Woman's View 



y 



The 

Chopping 

Block 

IjrPATBEASLEY 



For you cooia wit tlwre that Uke to try out new 
recipes oa your spouses and friends; uid if you 
have some time on your hands, give this one a try. 

I was sb surprised the first time I made this 
cake. 

"Who in the world has ever put orange (sticky) 
candy in a cake", I asked. 

Well, I tried it, and couldn't beUeve how great 
it tasted. 

Since the cake is extremely rich, (sinfully so), it 
will go a long way in serving your fiunily and 
friends. 

ORANGE SUCE CAKE 
1 cup margarine 2 cu|» su^r 

4 ^gs Vi cup buttermilk 

Itsp^soda 3 Vi cup plain flour 

1 lb. Chran^ Candy Slices Vi lb. dates 

1 cup pecans 1 cup Angd Flake coconut 

Cut oran^ candy slices, data and nuts into 
small pieces and coat with flour. Cream margarine 
and su^r until fluffy. 

Add eggs, one at a timt, beating afto- each ad- 
dition. Dissolve soda into buttermilk and add the 
flour and milk altematdy, beginning and ending 
with flour. 

Add coconut along with nuts, candy sUms and 
dates. . -^-— - — : 



From "Growing Child" 



Eyes And Hands Work Together 



Mix thc^oughly, pour into large tube pan and 
l»ke300* fw 1 hr. ^min., or until dmie. 

Pour a syrup made of 1 cup fresh orange juice 
and 2 cups XXXX sugar over cake while h(H. Let 
stand over night. 

As you can see, it's very moist. It reminds me of 
'days gone by' (putting the Christmas fruit cake 
together); but I like to refer to this recipe as my 
'Spring Fling Thing'. 

Try it, ami Enjoy! 



mm «0HM9 



mm nun carpets 
ANO roRimifiE 

CtfMIIO 
KttlilR-FIIESN 
mr MOFESSIONALS 



One of a baby's favorite 
activities is to explore 
things with his eyes and 
hands together, according 
to Growing Child, the 
monthly child develop- 
ment newsletter. 

At seven months, a 
baby wants to know how 
(Ejects feel and his eyes 
naturally look at what his 
hands are exploring. He 
will pick up a clothespin, 
block, plastic cup, or toy 
and feel it, flnger it, twist 
it ~ all the while looking at 
it. 

Utis urge to explore is 
so strong that a seven- 
month-old will be quite 
happy playing by himself 
for brief periods. When he 
is playing alone like this, 
let him be. Exploring with 
eyes and hands together is 
very important. Whenever 



a baby looks at an object 
and feels it at the same 
time, he is getting some 
very basic information 
about that object. 

Just as important, he 
gets information about the 
same object through tw4 
different senses at the 
same time. 

Looking and feeling are 
actually scientific ex- 
periments that a baby is 
making to learn some 
fundamental realities 
about his world and him- 
self. 

One of the m(»t impor- 
tant things he learns is that 
he has eyes and that he can 
use them to get infor- 
mation about the world. 
His eyes and hands 
together can "match up" 
and organize information. 

This "matching up" is 



impOTtant when a child 
gets to school. Letters and 
words have different 
^hapes and forms and in 
school he must be able to 
use his eyes to rec(^nize 
all tboM squiggly lines. 




Many school children 
who have trouble reading 
are simply having a hard 
time recognizing the 
shapa of tettot and wm-- 
ds. To hdp them learn to 
use their eyes, teactos in- 



volve than in activities 
where they can watch 
what their hands are 
doing. 

You can give a baby this 
valuable experience before 
he's even a year old by 
giving him objects with 
different "feels" to than: 
curved and straight, 
rough and smooth, heavy 
and light, big and little, 
solid and open. Give him 
cmly a few at a time, but 
chsinge them whoi he's no 
longer interested. 

rcnr more information 
on the physical and social 
development of children 
up to six years old, write 
to Growing Child, P. O. 
Box 620 N, Lafayette, In- 
diana, 47902. Include 
child's birthdate when 
writing. A year's subscrip- 
tion costs '11.93. 



Just For A Laugh!!!! 

Why do statues and paintings of George 
WasMngton always show him standing? 

BeouiM he would never lie. 

What is a dentist's Office? 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



A fining sutktn. 




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Parents Without Partners TMewaler CiMpter 166 

An introductory meeting was held on Feb. 22 
for th(»e parents who are single 4ue to the death 
of, or divorced or legally separated from the 
spouse or never married and who were interested 
in broadening thdr scope of life. 

For fUr^tf MMttutlon of other meetings, caU 
855-7661. , 



Virginia Bn^h Senior Otiien's 
February BicAdays 

We wish to extend our wishes to these fine people 
on their respective birthdays. Hai^jy Birthday to: 

Georgia Know - 23, Chuck Boone & Marion 
Stewart, 24, Alice Coradi & Ed Skoraszewski, 25. 

Gudrun Fesmcak, ^, Nellie MuUaney & Jane 
Hansen, 27, and Norman Cathell on the 28 of this 
month. 



The 

Hint 

Man 



By CHUCK FAULKNER 

Colored Materiab - To 

prevent color from fading 
or running, add one 
teaspoonful of Epsom 
salts to each gallon of 
water, both washing and 
rinsing water. 
Note: If black material is 
fading, try soaking it in 
ammonia after washing. 
Rinse by hand, don't use 
the dryer, and let the 
fabric dry in the open air, 
keeping it out of direct 
sunshine. 

Cookies - After washing 
and thoroughly drying the ' 
cookie jar, put a crumpled 
piece of tissue paper in the 
bottom of the jar to soak 
up any moisture. 
Note: Change the paper 
once a month. 
A SUcc Of Bread or a 
quarter of fresh apple in 
the cookie jar will soften 
cookies and prevent them 
from becoming hard and 
brittle. 

Cooling Rack, Sab- 
stitntlon • Invert a muffin 
iwn to make a marvelous 
emergency cooling rack in 
the kitchen. 
Copper, Cleaning And 
Polishing - Make a paste 
of one cup of any kind of 
flour, one cup of salt, and 
warm white vinegar. Ap- 
ply and rub well with a 
soft white doth, let dry, 
then wash in warm, soapy 




water. Rinse well and 
. polldi. 

Or cut a fresh lonon in 
half. Dip the fl^h of the 
half-lemon in salt, thm 
rub onto the copper. After 
it dries, wash in hot soapy 
water, then dry and 
polish. 

Qoict, Musty - If the 

closet is musty, ronove all 
articles, vacuum 
thoroughly, then wipe 
down all areas with a soft 
cloth dipped in one cup of 
ammonia, one-half cup of 
white vinegagr, and one- 
quarter cup of baking 
soda in one gallon of 
fairly hot wata. 
One or two charcoal 
briquettes placed in 
various spots will keep 
closets free from musty 
odors. 

CoAs - If a cork is too 
large for a bottle, soak it 
in very hot water for 
about Ave minutes so it 
will go in easily. 

Cotton Stocking, 
Recycll^ • Old cotton 
stockings, cut down the 
seam, make excellent 
dusting cloths. 

Chock FauOmer is brought to 
you through the oourttsy of The 
Dofiatag CoBpaay, a local 
publishing firm, and Chuck 
Faulkner. The book is available: \ 
in most bookstores. 



DUraCtearf takes the sou OUT! 



Endorsed by furtiishings 
manufacturers, 
the Duraclean 
Foam-Absorption 
Process gets 
the dirt out 
that the other 
methods leave in! 




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fibers. Walch colors 
and textures spring 
back to life, it's all 
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ready for guests the 
same day. 



Call ua tor B Fno QuotMon 
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Dnracleaii-Biirtoii Specialists 
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Phone 420-9206 



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Virginia Beach, Virginia, 23454 

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Looking For Us In College Parfc 



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PROCLAIMS 
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ON 

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14 K Gold 

Mens & Ladi^ Rings 
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BEAUTY SALONS 






We have styling choices 

for everyone and for 

allagesl 



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Precision 
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420-6069 



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No AppfrialflMits - Cone In At Yonr 

Convndenee 

AIM 3 salons in Newport News ami 

Hampton 



Frahchised >— Dance Studio 



Dancing. 

< et the spM. Laugh wxl haw 
Isome smitos again. Loosen 
up and danc« ttw nigM anny 
^op being a vNrtcher and s«Bp out 
irA>thelun. 

HWIIICheer 

YDuUn,IJft1buUp,And 

Put SmHes Of Fun Wfow 

I f g_ ^ Ibu can do Mat Arthur Murray s. 
I l llf. The leadbig dance nstnjciors can 
^■■■^" mtf»yDuaMpeit>danoK««ith 
poise and new cocMenoe. 

8 Simons For ~ 
*20/' 

Leamng 10 dance IS easy and tim 
«wlh the p«o«en ArttM Mivny^ 




goiriQ out IS a part o( tlw ben^ls a 
good d^icmg partner gatt. 'W« 
ttie Nrtt 0^>, c^lQf lessDns today 

HusOe ■ Swing • Stow Dance a 
Qia-Qw ■ Fen 'M a r^jfiM 
aCounlryaOVws 



^ 1P.M. to 10 P.M. 



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740 Timberlake Shopping Ctr. 
Holland RcMid & S. Plaza Trail 

VurgminBaich 



mmm 



Virginia Beach Sun, February 23, 1983 9 



The Woman's View 




.As Kitty Kat^ us^ to 
«<ng to us in thejtftus. . . . 

July 28. 1981 

I've neglected lately to 
keep you up to date on 
major holidays coming 
up. 

Tomorrow, of course, 
there's the wedding of 
Prince Charles and Lady 
Diana; and it will be a 
festive occasion, no 
doubt. When it comes to 
pageantry our mother 
country does the job 
properly, no question 
about it. 

But in the frenzy 
around the iluptials, we 
almost forgot that 
tomorrow is also Asphalt 
Road Day. That's right. It 
was on July 29, 1870 that 
the first asphalt road was 
constructed in Newark, 
New Jersey. I've been to 
Newark, and I'm sure that 
I've driven on that very 
road. 

But you don't have to 
go to Newark; we have 
some asphalt roads right 
her in Tidewater that ap- 
pear to have bem con- 
||nicted one hundred and 
eleven years ago, and one 
can get the same sense of 
history without even 
leaving town. 

It's my belief, though I 
can't prove it, that the 
hund]red eleventh andkre^ 
ivy of the first pothole in 
an aspllalt road should 
probably be celebrated 
sometime next week. 

It would be a more 
significant anniversary; 
after all, when was the last 
time you remarked on an 
aspjudt road. 



ByJIMiUNCAID 



Potholes, on the otim 
hand, get our attention 
and inspire some of our 
more colorful language. 

November 7, 1980. 

Some unidentified 
troublemaker brought a 
box of jelly doughnuts in- 
to the Thirteen newsroom 
today, and 1 was faced 
with an old problem. 

I don't eat jelly donuts. 

I like jelly donuts. 

In fact, I'm crazy about 
jelly donuts. 

But, I don't eat them 
because no matter how 
carefully 1 plan my attack 
on a jelly donut. at least 
half of the jelly winds up 
on my tie. 

Napkins don't help; 
bibs, knives and forks 
don't help; no matter how 
I eat a jelly donut, I wind 
up wearing most of the 
jelly, and a not incon' 
siderable portion of the 
sugar glaze they're always 
equipped with. 

So, I avoided those 
delightful booby traps of 
the pastry world, and wat- 
ched with glee when my 
producer chose one of the 
fattest of the lot. 

Justice, I thought, it's 
going to happen to 
somebody else. 

But, It didn't. 

He consumed it to the 
last bite without staining 
even one fingertip. 

I consider that, at the 
very least, unkind. 

This seriet of excerpu from 
"Notei To My Friendi" i» 
brought to you throu|^ the cour- 
tesy of The Doudai Coapny, a 
local pubUshing firm, and Jim 
Kincaid. The book is available ia 
most book stores. 



MaMaMMMNMMMMM«MMWM«M«MMM«MM^^ 

What has six lep, can live in ice or oil, and survive 
man's most ccmcentrated onslaught? InsecU, says the 
December Reader's Digest. This amazing creature 
exists in three or four million varieties, and despite 
man's efforts to eradicate some of them, not a single 
species has K) far been exterminated. 



WMMMMMII 



»■ 



What's 
cooking 

at The Circle? 



LIVE MAINE 
LOBSTER 



2" NEW YORK 
SIRLOIN STEAK 



$14 



95 



10 



95 



1 Vi lb. stuffed with jumbo The best quality steak 
crab meat in Tidewater 



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EARLY-BIRD SPECIALS 

• SauteedChickm 'OneLa^e 
Uvers M** Crab Cake '5 

• Fried or Broiled • Fried Scallops $^%S 
Trout *^ 



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as 



LUNCHEON I'XlO Tuesday Saturday 

BUFFET ^ 

NIGHTLY 
ENTERTAINMENT 

Ray ^nvn At The Piano 




Taeiday Muw Saiw^ 



$Mtm.'ti 



imo 




^j MltlDGHSTBEET 

povrsMOirra 



At Edie Adams 



The Whole Family Concept With No Waiting 




Low prices, good ser- 
vice and no appcrintments 
is the thane of Delbert 
and Alice Sexton, 
ownen/managers of the 
Edie Adams' Cut A Curl 
Beauty Salons. 

I%st established in the 
Witcfaduck and Virginia 
Beach Boulevard area in 
July 1970, tlw franchise 
has expuided to 10 salons 
in the Tidewater area with 
two more opening up 
within the next 6 weeks. 

One will be opoiing up 
in two weeks in the CoUey 
Yilli^e Siopinng Center 
in Norfolk and the otim 
at the Ehnhurst Square 
Sh(q^)ing Center in Por- 
tsmouth within 6 weeks. 

From the very begin- 
ning their idea was to 
provide a facility where 
the whole famUy can find 
the style of thdr choice, at 
a price they can afford 
and with no hassle of 
having to make appoin- 
tments or long delays. 

When you attend any of 
their salons you will find 
they doln fat^ have plenty 
of staff and are trained in 
the latest hair 0yles and' 
cuts. 



The training for, all the 
salons is mainly handled 
by their son Delbert, Jr. 
who also assists in 
managing the business. 
Their daughter, Linda 
handles the supplies for 
the salons. 

All the Edie Adams' 



salons pride themselves on 
being able to change with 
the . needs of their 
customers. One of the best 
examples is their approach 
to the already importance 
of hair care for men. 

Edie Adams now 
features a complete range 



of men's hair services, in- 
cluding men's pecms, the 
natural way to add 
fullness to hair. 

If you're in a hurry, low 
on cash and need help 
with your hair needs, stop 
in the Edie Adams nearest 
you. 



Ti 



i k 



I ^ k I 



EDIE ADAMS Cut & Cur! 




As BOled oa the windows: 
No AppotatfliieBts, Just 
CoowIb. 



Lifestyles And Heartburn 



Whether you are a 
woridng mother hurrying 
from the office to pick up 
the kids at the day-care 
center, an executive racing 
to catch the next flight 
home, or a parent late for 
your dght-year-old's soc- 
cer game, you are 
probably suffering tiom 
scmie form of stress. 

According to Dr. 
DcmaUl O. Castell. dU-ec- 
tor of the Section of 
Gastroenteric^ and a 
professOT of medicine at 
Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine, Winston- 
Salem, N.C., many 
Americans have lifestyles 
that create streu, which 
may result in heartburn. 

Heartburn it the backup 
of digesting food into the 
esoi^iagus. It's caused by 
a Muriety of factors, says 
Dr. Castdl, and stren is 
bdfeved to be one of tlwm 
because it produces add in 
thestomadi. 



What do you do when 
you suffer from heart- 
burn? One solution is to 
take an antacid that 
sooths the lining of the 
esophagus, preventing the 
stomach acid from contac- 
ting the delicate tissues of 
the esophagus. 

Although it is difficult 
to alter people's lifestyles. 
Dr. Cutell offers several 
suggestions for relieving 
the symptons of heart- 

buQii _ 

Sleep witii the feead of 
yov iM4 rataed abont six 
inches (preferably by 
ptacing Mocks uder the 
Ic^ at the head of the 
bed.) 

Stop or cat down on 
tnoktan. 

ReAaee If yoa're over- 
wflfht. 

Avoid beverages that 
■ay atimnlate acid 
sMKtkNB in the stomach, 
sack na coffee and 




VALENTINE SWEETHEART ■ "JO" WILLIAMS 

The ZETA UPSILON Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi 
Sorority honored their Valentine Sweetheart, Joretta 
"Jo" Williams at a Sweetheart dance on Saturday, 
February 5 in the Diamond Club at Met Farj^. 

Each chapter of sorority honors a girl in its chapter 
each year at the dance. 

On February 14, a Valentine's shower of gifts was 
presented to Jo. All members of Zeta were present and 
enjoyed refreshments of cheese, wine and a lovely 
Valentine cake. 

Jo is a true sister and sweetheart to her sorority and 
family, Jimmy and son, Casey. 

ZETA LOVES YA! 




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Virgiiiia Beacli» Virginia 

490-3105 



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Entire Stock 



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481-6603 



The 

Uprooted 

Gourmet 

By J. ROBERT PERSON 



Pork and poultry dishes are particularly craved for 
during this time of year and into the spring. Many times 
they can be complimented by the same garnishes and 
classic sauces, based on the meat. These recipes, you 
will And, will set well in your cooking flares as it hits the 
air. 

Steak DUonalac Saacc 

Pileuor Rib Steak 4each 

Whole black peppercorns 3 tbsp 

Butter 4 tbsp. 

Olive oil 2 tbsp. 

Brandy ' 2 tbsp. 

Heavy cream : ... '/i cup 

Salt .«. . . to taste 

Dijon mustard 2 tbsp. 

Crush peppercorns on a board, by pressing them or 
rdling over them with a heavy object. Or you may crush 
them coarsely in a mortar if you have one. Press the 
crushed peppercorns mto the sides of the meat. 

Heat olive oil and butter in a skillet. Saute the steaks 
in pan over high heat for 2 minutes, turning them only 
once over. Lower the heat and cook each steak to the 
doneness you desire. 

Remove steaks from the pan, onto a plate. Add 
brandy to the pan and ignite. Allow flame to die down 
While shaking the pan, gradually stir in heavy cream. 
Add dijon mustard and continue to stir. TUm to a low 
heat, season with a little salt and simmer for three 
minutes. Place steaks intd sauce and turn over 
steaksauce. Remove from heat and «erve. 
Savory Oranfc Saace 

Espanole sauce (brown sauce). 2 cups 

Orange juices 2 oranges 

* Lemon juices , I lemon 

Red Wine ^ cup 

Red cunant jelly 4 tbsp. 

Salt and cayenne pepper to taste 

Rub the espanole sauce thru a sieve (strainer). Add 
orange and lemon juices. Also add wine and current 
jelly. Place into a small pan and heat thoroughly. 
Season to taste with salt and cayenne pepper. This is a 
good sauce to compliment duck or chicken. 
Fttk and Spiaadi Fata 

Spinach, fresh '. 31b. 

Pork shouMer, KOund.iMU.* 3 lbs. 

8^t... ...« S. VA tbsp. 

BhKk pqjper ground. .:.:rt U4 tsp. 

Bay leaf. I ^i each 

Cloves, ground '/^ tsp. 

Mace. .;. '/j Up. 

Wash spinach and place into 2 cups of boiling water, 
in a large pot. Cock until the spinach has wilted (about 
minutes). Drain spinach and chop the spinach 
coarsely. Squeeze as much water from the spinach as 
possible. Add ground pork, salt, penier, bay leaves, 
cloves, and the mace. Blend thoroughly and pbu» the 
mixture into an 8 to 12 cup terrine or a bread loaf pan. 
Cover with aluminum foil and bake 373° for IVi hrs. 
This can be served hot or cold. 

I bid you a good day from the Uprooted Gourmet. 



O:. 



11:00 '(,'.00 
a CCn44t4C 



^. 





Firm & Fitness 

Chesapeake 's Newest Exercise 

Saion For Women 

Is now taking registrations. 

Special Grand Opanlns 
Ratas Ara AvaNaMa 

Tliroii^ Ptbruary For All 
Mtflib«rfMpt. 

482-5254 

• Exerdsc EqaipMCBt , 

• Sckedalcd TesBi Exefdic (ij 

• UiMmIImI Visits 

912 S. Battlefield Boulevard 
Ch^apeake, Virginia 




^p^^p 



IW 



■w 



mm 



■iwi 



10 Virginia Beach Sun. Februvy 23. 1983 



Yirglnia Beach Business & Real Estate Hews 



Prominent Tidewater 
Residents To Be Arrested 



More than thirty law- 
abiding Tidewater area 
resident^ will be arrested 
and jailed during 
Chesapeake "Cardiac 
i\rrest" day on March 4 
from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
at the CR^peake 
Sheriff's DepaPtflfent. 
Participants will remain in. 
jail until they reach their 
predetermined bail 
amount. 

Lynne F. Jenkins, Car- 
diac Arrest chairman said, 
"this event gives ev«7one 
involved the opportunity 
to have fun while raising 
money to help the Heart 
Association continue the 
fight against our numbor 
one killer-heart disease." 

Funds raised from the 
"Cardiac Arrest" will 
support Virignia and 
national heart research 
projects, public and 
professional education 
and community service 
programs. A goal of 
$7,000 has been set for the 
event. 

Anyone wishing to hdp 



"bail out" th(»e arrested 
can call 420-9571 prior to 
the event or 347-61 39 the 
day of the event or send 
pledges to "Cardiac 
Arrest" 1311 Hawthorne 
Drive, Chesapeake, 
Virginia. 2332S. All 
"Cardiac Arrest" contri- 
butions are tax deductible. 
The following people to 
be arrested on Chiesapeake 
"Cardkc Arrest" day are 
as follows: 

Jackie Aldridge, 
president of Women's 
Division, Chesapeake 
Chamber of Commerce; 
Liz Austin, member of 
Links; David Bouchard, 
attorney; Mary Brable, 
The Chums Bridge dub; 
Ray Cartwrigbt, president 
of Chesapeake Young 
Farmers; 

Richard CMrd, general 
manager and marketing 
director, Chesapeake 
Post; Fred Creekmore, 
delegate to General 
Asjembly, Chesapeake; 
Harold Dodge, prindpal 



of Oscar Smith High 
School; Tom Forehand, 
delegate to General 
Assembly, Chesapeake; 
Tom Freedman, reporter, 
WVEC; KeUy Halstead, 4- 
H leader; Charles G. 
Hackworth, president of 
Engineering Media; 

F. Colen Hodgson, vice 
president of Southern Oil; ' 
Cecil Jenkins, city coun- 
diman, Chesapeake; John 
Keffer, dty councihnan, 
Chesapeake; Tim Kerr, 
provost at Tidewater 
Community College, 
Chesapeake Campus; 
Johnny Knox, owner of 
Knox Body Shop; Dr. 
Alan P. Krasnoff, chiro- 
practor; 

Jean Loxley. owner of 
Great Bridge Press; J. 
Paul Luck, president of J. 
Paul Luck, Inc.; Dudley 
Miles, J. D. Miles, Inc.; 
William T. Parker, state 
senator to General 
Assembly, Chesapeake; 
Jeanne Richards, public 
service director. WLTY; 

Vic Roach. vice 



president of People's 
Bank of Chesapeake; 
Debbie Rubin, vice 
president of marketing, C 
& S Railcar Company: 
Russell Sawyer, sales 
manager. Gill Coffee; 
Susan Sculthorpe. 4-H 
dub leader; ^ 

Ann SMnners. assistant 
vice president of 
operations for Armada- 
Hoffler; Ron Speer, editor 
of Chesapeake Clipper; 
Audrey Stehle, president 
of Chesapeake league of 
Womens Voters; Irene 
Walker, clerk of court. 
City of Chesapeake; 

Dr. WiUiam E. Ward, 
city councilman, 
Chesapeake: Lyle Wer- 
mers, president of Green- 
brier Associates; Colon 
Whitehurst, attorney; 
Cecil Wright, division 
manager of customer ser- 
vices, Vepco; Howard 
Wright, partner in 
Thompson and Wright 
ArchitecU; David Wynne, 
president of Chesapeake 
Chamber of Commerce. 



For The Farmer 



Encouraging Economic Signs 



There are some en- 
couraging economic signs 
visible that are pointing to 
better days ahead for 
agriculture, sayi Gene A. 
James, executive vice 
president and general 
nAwiftr of Southern 
StatMCM^wative. 

"While farmers may 
continue to have some 
problems in the next year 
or so, I'm optimistic 
about the long term future 
of agriculture." James 
reported in a videoti4>ed 
nMssage to local fanners 
who attended a r^cmal 
board meeting held 
February IS at Franklin, 
Va. 

"There are several en- 
couraging sigiu, James 
says. First, time's less in- 
flation and lowff interest 
rates; second, livestock 
feeding is now more 
profitable; third, there's 
recognition of farm 
problems and something is 
bdng done about than; 
and fourth, we are on the 
threshold of a new era in 



agriculture, an era of 
technology and infor- 
mation that will bode well 
for agriculture." 

According to Dr. 
Joseph Coffey, the 
cooperative's dii«ctor of 
economics and planning, 
who appeared with James 
in the yideotMpe, "This 
will be the era of the com- 
puter and will ha\« a 
tremendous effect upon 
agriculture. Knowledge 
and information and the 
fastCT communication of it 
will lead to replacing 
fadlities and will help 
eliminate double and 
triple handling of inven- 
tory. This will be possible 
because we wiU have a 
precise inventory and 
farmers will be more 
precise in their ordering of 
supplies." 

Mr. Jim Coleman, 
director of merchandising 
for the cooperative, repor- 
ted b> the sMsion that the 
continuing recessionary 
farm economy and generd 
economy caused volume 



and prices to fall bdow 
the prior year by almost 10 
percent. 

Net savings, after 
provision for income 
taxes, and equity adjust- 
ment, were down $3.3 
million for the first 6 mon- 
ths of the years. 

Formula feeds were 
down 14,000 tons as com- 
pared to last year, because 
of record on-farm grain 
and forage, plus low grain 
prices which continued to 
pressure farmns to feed 
more of these items and 
purchase leu feed. 

Fertilizer tonnage was 
off 43,000 tons as com- 
pared to a year ago. The 
decline reflects the overall 
industry situation due 
largdy to a decrease in fer- 
tilizer consumption. 

Seed volume for this 
year was $7.1 million as 
compared to $7.6 million 
a year ago. 

Farm suppli« rrached 
$37.4 million, up slightiy 
over last year. 



Petroleum gallonage 
was down slightiy to 94.8 
million as compared with 
96.6 million last year. 

Grain marketing 
volume reached 17.4 
million bushels, down 
from.l8.S niWioi^,bush^. 

Other featiim of ^e 
session included a video- 
tajMd personal message 
from Secretary of Agri- 
culture John Block. 

A total of 37 of diese 
regional meetings are 
being held over a five-state 
area this month by 
Southern States. The 
cooperative serves farmer 
members who live in 
Virginia. West Virginia, 
Maryland, Delaware and 
Kentucky and who h<M a 
total of 336,833 member- 
ships in the organization. 

Board members and 
young farmers attending 
the session from this area 
were: David Flanagan, 
William H. Gilbert, J. 
Stuart Ives, M. Z. Zydron 
and Pud Zydron, Jr. 




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Don't Miss These 

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547-5441 



♦•Builder j^ys closing costs (less Prepaids) 
••Large lots - approx. 1/3 acre 
••Many custom crafted feitures are standard . 
♦•Brick or Vinyl Siding 

VISIT THESE THIS WEEKEND 

OR ANY WEEKEND 

12:30 to 5 p.m. 

Site Repr^entative, Tom Seddon 

547-1616 (home) 

547-4555 (office) 

WE ARE NO. 1 IN GREAT BRIDGE 

RICARDO, INC. 
REALTORS 

SSI JOHMSTOWN ROAD CHtSAPEAKI, VA. 

547-45SS 

la TiM HmH Of OrMi M^ 



Stihl Official Does Demo 
As TV Guest 

Jack Guthie, Stihl's manager of mvlceting ser- 
vices, recently appeared on national cable 
television in a program called "The Weekend 
Gardener" as the guest of the show's host, Jim 
Geddes. Geddes had planned a program around 
the factors one should consider in locating the 
ideal garden spot. However, the site selected by 
Geddes had one thing a good garden doesn't need- 
-too much shade. A 30-year-old pine was the 
culprit. Geddes figure since the tree would have 
to come down anyway, why not illustrate chain 
saw safety techniques and proper felling 
procedures to his home viewers. So he invited 
Jack Guthrie to come and do the job for the 
television camera. , 




New Financial Service 
From Citicorp 



For repeat home-buyers 
in the Richmond/Norfolk 
area, alternative financing 
programs as well as the 
conventional 30-ycar fixed 
rate first mortgage are 
being offered by Citicorp 
Person-to-Person, one of 
the nation's leading 
shelt^ mortgage lenders. 

The Rapid Equity Mort- 
gage offers payments for 
the first 2 years, compar- 
able to those of a mort- 
gage amortized over 30 
years, but with a payoff in 
^ess than IS years. 

Beginning with the third 
/ear, the payments in- 
:rea8e by 3^ annually and 
directly reduce the prin- 
:ipal balance. t 

"Fot the buyer who 
plans to trade up to a 



larger home in the future, 
this Rapid Equity Mort- 
gage allows him to build 
up equity faster without 
relying on inflation," 
states Jean Shelton, Nor- 
folk Citicorp's Person-to- 
Person area manager. 
"There is a substantial 
savings in total interest 
over the life of the loan 
and the tax savings from 
interest deductions during 
the first seven years are 
comparable to a conven- 
tional 30-year mortgage." 

A recent national survey 
by Citicorp Person-to- 
Person concluded that the 
Rapid Equity Mortgage is 
he "most popular of our 
"irst mortgage programs. 
More home buyers are op- 



ting for reduced payback 
periods, predetermined 
annual payment increases 
and accelerated equity 
growth-all of which are 
offered by our REM pro- 
duct, a version of the 
growing equity mortgage 
(GEM)," explained 
Ronald Zenke, Citicorp 
vice president. 

Citicorp Person-to-Per- 
son's unique combination 
of products, personalized 
service and financing ex- 
pertise assures prospective 
homebuyers of getting just 
the right loan for their 
specific situation. Other 
shelter loans include 
Flexible Buy Down 
Programs which qualify' 
the buyer for a more ex- 
pensive home than he 



would otherwise be able to 
afford and a fixed pay> 
ment 15-year mortgage 
which allows couples in 
their 40*s to complete their 
mortgage payments before 
retiring. 

"We feel that it is just 
as important to explore 
financing opportunities as 
it is to pick out the right 
house," says Ernestine 
Moore, area manager of^ 
the Richmond Citicorp 
Person-to-Person office. 

For further information 
on Citicorp Person-to- 
Person {>ersonalized first 
mortgage loan programs 
ple^e caU: Nd^fOlk: (804) 
46r-lt44 or*" Richmtmd: 
(804)282-3101. . 



|j 




ODE 



TOWNE 



OPENING THIS WEEK 

A Custom Townhouse Community in 

the Urban Tradition. We offer 

exceptional quality at 

pre-d ev?l opme nt prices. 





DMECTIONS: Eiit Iron bLt'ttHmj^ 
toui(> onto ind « p«mwic« Blvd Coffinia 
10 Naw ind«pend*AC«, tum right on 
^ SihwiH) Dr MoOM on Mlt 



Kay Af drill 
4<O-2770 



460-1610 



490-2356 



REALTY DIMENSIONS INC. 

ffii Q l£) 



NOW AVAILABLE station One 

24th & Ocean Frcmt 
^> Virginia Beach, Virginia 




104 2-lUKHn Suites 



NEW CCWSTRUCnON 



OCEANFRONT RESORT 
CONDOMINIUM 

24th & Atlantic 
Finnt In Virginia Beach 
Own your own Oceanfront suite, not time 

glaring . From *8 1,500. Exclusive sales 
by PYLE REALTY 460-1777. 

Sales Of^ 422-31K ^Eves.) Ro^ Pyk 

3494441 

WE ARE GETTING GOOD RESULTS 




SCHOOL 

ISN'TJUST 
FOR KIDS.... 



II 



102 Sold. 2 «e 



m 



Since 1972 we've trained 

some of the most suo^sful 

realtors and brokers in the 

Tidewater Area. Our graduates 

come from all walks of life. 

Some make Real Estate a 

career, other enjoy the 

freedom of part time selling, 

while many home owners 

take our course for 

their own personal 

knowledge. If you've 

ever been intrigu^ by 

Real Estate, give us a 

call today. Going to 

school can be fun. . .and profitable. 



SURETY 

REAL ESTATE SCHOOL 

$131 Pri^^s Anne Road 
Vfar^te fosck, VA 23462 (M4) 499-2395 



m 



■■IIH 



■MB 



Virginia Beach Sun, February 23, 1983 11 



01 



Yirsinia Beach Business & Real Estate News 



Pencil Is 
Key To 

Success 



"TIm pemal ia the key to 
the whole suo^ss of your 
business," says Roia 
Alexander, emphasizing 
the important she places 
on keeping accurate 
records in mder to wwk 
economically. "You've 
got to use a pencil to be in 
business. It tells you what 
you can and can't spend. 
It's called using common 
sense." 

Since she establbhed A 
& B Janitorial S^vice, 
2314 Keller St., Norfolk in 
December, 1977, Mrs. 
Alexander has used her 
pencil and her common 
sense to turn a $16,000 in- 
vestment into a firm which 
currently employs forty- 
one persons, 
percent of 
men." 

As A & B*s sole 
proprietor she is firm 
believer in plowing the 



Oceana, and a number of 
private businesses. It took 
almost a year for A & B's 
SBA 8(8) application to be 
processed, she says, "but I 
didn't let that stop me," 
adding that with or 
without 8(a) certification, 
"It's my job to get con- 
tracts myself." 

Retain enough working 
capital and try to keep 
from borrowing, she ad- 
vises. 

"If the bank says no, 
apd the SBA says no, and 
you can't get the job... I 
can't work that way." 

Mrs. Alexander, whose 
five children are grown 
and whme husband en- 
courages her but "doesn't 
know the first thing about 
my business and doesn't 
have time to learn," spen- 
ds "fourteen, sixteen, 
twenty-four hours a day" 
running her business. 
Although each job has an 
profits back ipto the appointed supervisor, she 



"ninety-nine 
whom are 



business. 

"You can't think the 
money is yours to spend," 
she cautions. Men, in h«- 
opinion, are more inclined 
to ignore bookwork and 
spend profits prematurely 
on personal luxuries. Mrs. 
Alexander, instead, has 
been building equity as 
owner of the lar^ house 
which serves as A A B's 
(tffice, a warehouse in 
South Norfolk, a personal 
residence and two trucks. 

A A B's current con- 
tracts include four 
Tidewater area com- 
missaries, the Naval 
R^onal Medical Centea 
at Sewell's Point and 



personally visits each site 
on a regular basis. If some 
of the men (^oubt her 
judgement at first, they 
soon learn "there's 
nothing they can do that I 
can't. You have to prove 
that you can do that job 
better." 

Mrs. Alexander worked 
part-time in janitorial ser- 
vice for fifteen years while 
holding a full-time civil 
service job as an electronic 
mechanic before going in- 
to buiiness for herself. 

"If a job is done right 
the first time, then I'm 
making money," she says. 
"My uwork speaks foe 
me." 




R. Craig Upton 



Va Beach Fe(ieral 
Appoints V. P.* s 



Joanne W. Hanks and 
R. Craig Upton have been 
promoted to vice president 
positions for Virginia 
Beach Federal Savings and 
Loan Association. The 
announcement was made 
today by William L. 
Owens, President. 



Hanks becomes Vice 
President and Manager of 
the Savings Department. 
She has been with the 
Association since 1975 
and was formerly an 
Assistant Vice President. 
She resides in Virginia 
Beach. 



Upton becomes Vice 
President and Manager of 
the Loan Department. He 
has been with the Associ- 
ation since 1976. He was 
formerly an Assistant Vice 
President and Construc- 
tion Loan Department 
Manager. He and his 
family reside in Chesa- 
•peakt. * 

Virginia Beach Federal 
Savings and Loan has five 
area branches. The 
Association has iiKreased 
savings more than 350%. 
during the past 18 months, 
and is natioaally ranking 
in the Top 25 in earnings. << 



Serving The Real Estate Needs 
Of Chesapeake 

WAINWMGHT REALTY 

Are you considering selling your home? If so, now is the ideal 
time. Call us for a free, no obligation market analysis. We will in- 
form you of the b«t methods of disposing of your property, 
various types of pnandn^ available and other information pet- 
tinent to the sale of your pr<yerty . 

3:^7 Western Branch Blvd. 

In The Heart Of Churchland 




484-7777 



Maid>cn <rf Partnouth. Chcwpeake Multipte Listing Service 
Mend Mukiirfe Uitinf Senfice 
Portsmouth. ClMMpcake Board of Realton 




SuiewaU 




irgiiiiaBe«:fa Blvd. West 
Norfolk. Virginia 23510 
Phone (804) 623-3831 

A OIVIHON OF OOLOfOAL SEKVICe OntPOKATlON 



OAiianlk Pennaiient Afait0i0e Ccxnixmiy 

A WhoBy Owned Siifad^uy (rf^iulk Pennanent Federal 
Savfa^i 4 Lou AMOditini 

944 1]i(^)eiideiice Blvd. 

Virginia Beadi, Virginia 23455 

(804)460-1376/2S10 



^&>l<mia4 




A IXVBKJN or On-WOAL SEXVKX COMKMATION 

Virginia Be^ Boutevard West 

Norfolk, Virgima 23510 

Phone (804) 623-3753 



K^olonial cJitU 



J^c 



gencg 



Ai)mBONcra&OMAi.aBmcEoaifoaATioN 

141 Vninda BeKk Blvd. Wefi 

Notfeft. Vin^iria ^10 

Tdcptoig (804) 623-3831 




REALTY WORLD. 

National Realty Inc. 

"The Results People" 
Serving 

All of Tidewater 

Sell -Buy -Rent 



Cainelot»«Dunedin 

Locksley Gardens 

Silverwood»» Peachtree 

Brentwood«»Tiinberlake 

Greenrun««Foxhall 

Pine N^dles»«Newtown South 

and ^ 

Many many others. 



CALL 



48S-5950 
463-49(M) 



Chesapeake 
Portsnoath 

Vir^nta Beach 
Norfolk 



N^x)litano To Address 
Builder - Dealer Seminar 



\ 



The ISth annual 
Builder-Dealer Seminar 
will open in Martinsville, 
Va.. on Feb. 28 at 1 p.m. 
at the National Guard 
Armory on Common- 
wealth Blvd. Sponsored 
by American Standard 
Hornet Corp. of Martins- 
ville, the two-day seminar 
draws more than 250 per- 
sons from a 14-state area, 
who are affiliated with 
home builders and deate's 
specializing in packaged 
homes. The early 
registration is most en- 
couraging according to 
Michad Eanes, president 
of American Standard 
Homes. 

Keynote speaker at the 
afternoon session will be 
Fred Napolitano, past 
IH'esident of the National 
Association of Home 
Builders, Washington. 
D.C., who will discuss the 
past year in the housing 
industry and what can be 
expect^ in the next year. 

According to Eanes, 
"The health of our in- 
dustry lies in the report of 
what Napolitano accom- 
plished in 1982 as presi- 
dent of the association." 



Other afternoon 
seminar speakers include: 
Donald Spear, director of 
survey research. National 
Home Builders 

Association Research 
Foundation, Rockville, 
Md., who will discuss the 
use of various housing 
materials to -meet the 
needs of construction in 
today's market. 

Richard Butoff, 
marketing manager, 
Owens-Corning Fiberglas 
Corp., will introduce a 
new energy performance 
design system which in- 
volves the use of com- 
puters to calculate home 
cooling and heating costs. 

A highlight of the Mon- 
day evening awards ban- 
quet will be the present- 
ation of plaques and cash 
awards to outstanding 
home builders and 
dealers. 

On Tuesday, there will 
be tours of the American 
Standard Hom^ plant for 
those seminar participants 
who will want to see 
production methods for 
industrialized housing and 
package homes and model 
homes. 




ByRO(«ERPYI£ 



Home Security 



We have talked in the 
, past about the many ser- 
i viife* ytt* itefltor ren- 
' ders in putting tocher a 
cdibplete Real Estate 
package-procuring buy- 
ers and sellers, finan- 
cing, negotiating, and 
. many things that go 
beyond what would be 
considered the normal 
scope of a Realtor's 
duties such as the exam- 
ple 1 gave of preparing 
Thanksgiving dinner for 
a family moving in. 

I note with interest 
that Realtors in 
Philadelphia and York, 
PA, have put together a 
cooperative effort 
among Realtors and 
police to stop crime 
before it happens. It is 
called "Realtor Watch". 



1 can see it coming for 
our area. I note with 
alarm that there were 
3,249 burglaries in 
Virginia Beach in 1982. 
Only WV» of those were 
"cleared." 1983 is star- 
ting off with a bang. 

Recently there were 
seven burglaries in seven 
days in one Virginia 
Beach neighborhood. If 
you stop to thing about 
it, this sort of thing can 
have a very detrimental 
effect on both short and 
long term property 
values. All of us need to 
do everyting we can to 
keep oiu* eyes open and 
report suspicious activity 
to the police in an effort 
to stop our alarming 
crime rate. 



WfaY list wHh CENTUBY 2r? 



Because we can sell your house. 

• The CENTURY 21 systmi cIcMes an average of 
deal every minute of the day, every day of the 
year. 

Number 1 in recognition 

• The CENTURY 21 system has 99% awareness 
among homebuyers and sello's. 

Number 1 in preference. 

• The CENTURY 21 system is preferred 3 to 1 
over all of its national competitors combined. 

Number 1 in adv«1ising. 

• The CENTURY 21 system supporU its sales 
associates with *24 million in aidvertising - the 
largest ad prc^am in the r«U estate industry. 

And more. Mi^h more. 

CoBsmnen believe that the 
CENTURY 21 system: 

• has the oKMt professional and best trained sain 
assodates among its national competitors. 

• can do more to hdp huytn a«l sellers arrange 
financing than any of its national competitors. 
(In fact, nw have m(»-e experirace in this area 
than any other real estate saks (n-ganization 

anywto-e.) 

• out do more than its natimal &xapttiton to 
owve you anywtev thrwglMWt the cmmtry. 

• eu hdp yoa find a snaU real otate invotment 
^{qierty throughcHit the USA and Omada. 




Job Related Moves 
Qualify For Income 
Tax Deduction 



Planning to change 
jobs soon? If the new 
job requires you to 
relocate, some of the ex- 
penses associated with 
your move may be tax- 
deductible, according to 
Clyde Stallings, Vice 
President of Security 
Allied Moving and 
Storage, local agent for 
the "World's No. 1 
Mover"-Allied Van 
Lines. 

"To qualify for tax 
deductions,". Stallings 
explained, "moving ex- 
penses must satisfy cer- 
tain criteria, including a 
'distance test' and a 
•time test.'" 

"The time test 
requires you to work at 
least 39 weeks during the 
12 month period im- 
mediately following your 
arrival in the new job 
location." 

Details are contained 
in IRS Publication 521, 
entitled "Moving Expen- 
ses."-applies to moves 
within the United States, 
and Form 3903-- 
"Foreign Moving Ex- 
pense Adjustment"~ap- 
plies to moves abroad. 
All can be obtained-free 
of chargellfrom most 
local IRS offices. 

Some expenses which 



may qualify for tax 
deductions, according to 
Stallings, include: 
•house-hunting trips 
prior to the move; 
•shipment of personal 
belongings (including 
costs for packing and 
crating, in-transit 
storage, and insurance); 
•costs relating to the sale 
of the former home and 
the purchase of a new 
one (including realtor 
commissions, attorney 
fees, title search and 
escrow fees, points or 
loan placement charges, 
state transfer taxes, etc.); 
•temporary living expen- 
ses at the new location; 
and 

•travel to the new home. 
"There are.no limits to 
deductions for moving 
your household goods 
and traveling to your 
new home-as long as the 
expenses are reasonable 
and the proper 
requirements are met," 
said Stallings. "Depen- 
ding on your marital 
status, however, dollar 
limits do apply to deduc- 
tions for other move- 
related expenses. 
Therefore, it's advisable 
to read aiid understand 
the information 
provided by the IRS." 



Nora Davenport wm hoaorcd Feb. 21 as the 
"Wonaa Of The Year" by the Woncn's 
Division, Cimapcakc Ckanber of ComaMrcc. 
Itevenport, showa here, displays the award. 




More 

Fragile The Dcdlar, 
The More Vital 
TIk Home. 



Sometimes) .when you least expect it, you 
discover that special house. At Gifford, 
we've seen it luippen for three decades. 
And that's why, especially today, our 
agents are so thoroughly trained to exper- 
tly guide you in creative Hnancing that 
matches your budget. And help you turn 
that dream hcnisc into reality. 

OlffOrd 



REALTY INC 



Key People in TUewater Real Estate 
4505 Haygood Rd. 4f»-2424 
I547E.UttleCre^Rd. 



-J 

it 
;t 
r. 




mm 



IPIWi 



wTwwmm 



12 Virginia Beach Sun, February 23, 1983 



Virginia Beacli Sun Hews 



^Undercover Reporter Fears The Worst, Finds Respect, In Jail 




'We've got to find an 
alternative to jail. I don't 
know the answer, but, I 
know there has got to be 
a better way, " • Smith 



Sheriff S.Joe Smith 



Continued from Page I 

for," the guard said. There was a hde in the 
blanket's center through which one could fit a 
bowling ball, but, I reasoned, it was better than 
nothing. 

After a long, frigid hour, I was transported by 
van to the jail, where the first person I 
encountered was a nurse. "V.D.? Akdidism? 
Homosexuality? Drug abuse?" she inquired. 
"No," I replied. *'&oovy," she said. 

From there, I was led to what appeared to be a 
locker room, where I was tdd to remove all of my 
clothing. A guard then examined my genital area, 
presumably in 'search of ccmtraband. I was issued 
an orange jump suit, just like the ones all pre-trial 
inmates are given, along with a pair of plastic 
shower shoes. 

Another guard then led me to the jail's "C 
block m the first floor, and hustled me into cell 
num|?er four. "Enjc^ your stay, sir," he said, as 
the door crashed shut. 

^iow.I had time to reflect upon exactly what I 
had done. Here I am, stuck in this cage, and the 
ordy one who knows who I am is the sheriff, I 
thought. What if something happens to him? I'll 
be stuck here forever. 

I looked around my cell. Although not quite the 
dungeon I expected, it certainly beared no 
resemblance to the Holiday Inn, either. Hie beds 
are approximately two and a half fleet wide, with 
half-inch thick, flame retardant mattresses. 
Stainless Steel toilet-sink combinations sit on the 
other side ctf the cell for all to see. The ceU was 
about seven-feet deep, uround four-feet wide, and 
the ceiling stood nearly 14-fieet off the ground. 
Massive iron bars sei»rate the inmates from the 
outside. The walls are painted a bright, canary 
yellow, a cd(»- which did not seem congruous with 
the Mherwise dank sunoundings. 



*The walls are painted a bright, canary 
yellow, a color which did not seem 
congruous with the otherwise dank 
surroundings, ' 



Around noon, I was taken to the cafeteria for 
lunch. This was my first glimpse of the other 
inmates. They were adorned in orange suits lUte 
mine, blue otcs signifying conviction, and white 
CHies fat the trustees. 

With my single slice of cotto salami and 
american cheese on white bread and glass of ice 
tea, I peered all over the room to find a place to 
sit. Being the last person in line, I found, does 
have its disadvantages. Spying the one and only 
unoccupied seat, I dreaded my first encounter. 

"Is anyaie sitting here," I asked a youthful- 
looking num in a blue suit. 

"hto," he mumbled. 

"WeU, can I sit here, then?" 

He brd» into uncontrdlable laughter. 

"What's so funny," I asked. 

"Lode, ain't nobody asks around here. Tliey 
just do," he said. 

So, I sat, and I tried to eat, but I was too busy 
taking in everything around me. I noticed that I 
was among the dder prisoners around. Most, I 
guessed, were a few years younger than 1. 1 later 
famd that the average age of inmates in the jail is 
22 yeajs-old. 

"Look, man," the greasy-haired fellow next to 
me said. "This is a real easy place here. Ain't 
nobody hassling anybody else around here. You 
ain't got to worry about nothing," 

With that, some blue-suited inmates surveyed 
the wange-clad new anivals, attempting to 
determine the sexual persuasion of each. "Ah, 
that guy's a fag," said one. "Yeah, and I bet you 
that one over there's a fag, too," said another. 

After lunch, I was talttn to the jail library, 
where I indulged in perusal of periodicals. I 
picked up a C(^y of SporU Blustrated and 
broached through a story on the Redskins' Super 
Bowl triumph. Other prisoners in the library were 
consumed by law books, apparently in efforts to 
do something about their confinemenu. 

I was taken from the library by a staff 
psychologist, who {»it me through something 
called, "classification," which is an effort by jail 
officials to pigeon-hole inmates into a certain 
part of the facility, tn total, the jail has 25 
different classifications, depending upon the risk 
one seemii^ly imposes to himself and cthen. 
Those determiiKd to be suicidal, for example, are 
placed in i^ivitte oelb on the third floor with 
24-hour closed circuit television surveOlan^. 

I was asked about my fiunily, my eduction, my 
girlfriends, and my pension for committing o-ime. 
"Mila is an intelligent, articulate, pleasant young 
man and I anticipate no prdjlems from him," my 
examiner wrote of me. I was to be placed on the 
second floor with other non-violent offenders. 

After several matt hours <rf sitting in my cell, I 
was laKoi to dinner at arcmnd 4:40 p.m. The menu 
appeared to feature a variety <rf beef stew. I kiKJw 



that I was reminded greatly of public school 
lunches frcxn.my youth. Also aa my tray was a 
dessert which resembled apple cobler and a glass 
of, I guess, grape juice. I sat wilh two trustees 
who spoke nary a word to me for 20 minutes. 
People are beginning to suspect me, 1 thought. 

For all intents and purposes, I had reached the 
end of my first day in jail. I was taken back to my 
cell for the night. The only thing to do now, I 
reasoned, was to sleep. I curled up under my 
blanket and was starting to Aazt off when a sailor 
in the next cell struck up a conversation. 

I found out that he was in jail for three days on 
charges of indecent exposure. He had exited an 
oceanfront bar last summer and was urinating in 
an alley when a police officer made the arrest. He 
was released oa his own recognizance, but he set 
sail with the Navy the next day, skipping his court 
date. When his ship returned to port last week, 
the subpoenas awaited him, and so did his 
inevitable stay in jail. 

My contrived stwy seemed to work real well. 
Ihe sailo- was real interested in my burglary 
exploits. "That's unreal, man," he said, when I 
tdd him I was a professional burglar and that this 
was the first time 1 had been caught despite years 
of crime. - 



"I don't want a shower. I vrant to sleep." 
"You're going to court today, Mr. Gooding, 
and you want to look nice for the judge." 

Not wanting to blow my cover, I reluctuitly 
dxyed the guard. I returned to the room where I 
had been strip-searched the previous day, and 
showered while the guard lodced on. After 
haggling with him for several minutes about the 
necessity for a comb, I was returned to my cell 
where I dozed off. 

Soon, it was 6 a.m. and breakfast time. IVo 
boiled eggs, an English muffin, hash brown 
potiUoes, and hash, referred to by the prisoners as 
"'Alpo." The most coveted item on the tray isone 
half pint of vitamin D milk. Some inmates were 
willing to trade everything else on their trays in 
exchange for that milk. Eggs flew across the 
cafeteria as food was bartered. Befxxe long, I was 
once again in my cell trying to sleep. 

Within minutes, though, a guard again rustled 
me, telling me it was time to go to (»urt. I was led 
to an open area where I was handcuffed together 
with five other inmates and taSan by van to the 
courthouse. It is there, in the court's hdding cell, 
that I got my keenest insight into the mind of 
prisoners. 

A curly-haired guy, prdiably 20-years dd. 




Sleeping ii one of few wayt iuoatM paaa the hpon. 



The c(Miversati(ni lulled, and my thoughts again 
turned toward sleep. I was failing into a deep 
slumber when they locked up a drunk. I should 
have known then that sleep was going to be out of 
the question. I soon found out. 

"I want my goddamn phone call, he wailed. "If 
I don't get my phone call, I'm going to raise hell 
all night long." 

He did. 

At around 3:30 a.m., my inebriated friend 
passed aax and 1 was free, finally, to catch some 
sleep. It was a short-lived enterprise, though, 
because at exactly 4:50 a.m. a guard was 
awakening me. 

"Mr. Gooding, it's time for your shower," he 
said. 



complained that the judge was going to fine him 
$250. "Do you know how much dope, women and 
! rock and roll concerts $250 can buy," he asked. 

Another guy, in his later twenties, ft-eted about 
his plight. "This is a screwed up place," he 
moaned. 

Another prisoner offered a challenge. "This 
piMe isn't screwed up," he said. "It's us. We are 
screwed up individuals. Otherwise we wouldn't 
be here, would we?" 

Ihere was no response. 

Sheriff Smith retrieved me fron the cell at 
around five nunutes until 9 a.m. I& lock me to the 
court of Judge Calvin Spain, where my cell 
cdiorts would be given disposition hearings for 
their misdeameanor ofEenses. As for me, I was 
finally off the hotdc. 



$28 Per Man, Per Day 



Jail Houses 7,300 Inmates A Year 



The ^^rginia Beach Cbrrections Center, located 
off Princess Anne Road in the city's Municipal 
Center c^ned in February, 1978, replacing a 
31 -year old jail one mile away. 

The $5.6 millicxi fadlity can house up to 210 
inmates, 50 mott than the jail it replaced. The 
new jail features $250,000 worth (rf electronic 
surveiUance equipment, ccnnected by 85,000 feet 
of wiring. There are 88 closed circuit television 
cameras in use 24 hours per day in the jail. 

The three-story. Colonial Williamsburg-styk 
jail is the cmly corectional facility in the state 
certified for female and juvenile iim^iates in 
additicxi to male priscmers. 

Approximately 7,300 inmates per year are 
processed through the Virginia Beach city jail. 
The jail, although housed or city property, is 
supervised by the Sheriffs Department, which is 
an extensicm of the State government. leaded by 
Sheriff S. Joe Smith, the jail employs 105 
persons, including six lieutenants, 16 sergeants, 
around 70 deputies, and about a dozen techni-. 



dans, professionals and clerical workers. "We're 
about 25 people short oi what we need," noted 
Smith. 

Smith added that it costs the state an average of 
$28 per day for each inmate incarcerated in his 
jail. '^ 




MARGO 

AMERICAN 
PALMIST 



Featuring palm, physic and life rsodings, Sotitfqction 
guaranteed. Prices within reach of all. Advice pn 
business, health and marrioge. Seek the help of Margo 
today, your problems will be solved. Lucky days and 
numbers with reading. Margo has been located in the 
Tidewater area for 20 years. Has astonished many with 
her marvelous predictions. Permanently located in her 
own home. Readings are private and confidential. 
Margo is located in her same establishment ot 
Churchlond, Vo. Rt. 17 N. Pleose call for appointment 
and directions. 483(^7. Closed Mondoy. 



Seniors' Save 

Sun Subscription Discount 
For Beach Senior Citizens 




Virginia Beach Sun subscriptions for 
Virginia Beach residents 60 years or older 
may be purchased for $6 for one year, or 
$9 for two years. A regular one-year sub- 
scription is $9; two years is $12. To sub- 
scribe to The Virginia Beach Sun, Virginia 
Bach's community newspaper for 57 
years, call 4^3430 or mail check to The 
Virginia Beach Sun, 138 S. Rosanont 
Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 



'Here I am Ouek tn this 
cage . . . fyhat 1/ 
something h^ptns to 
(ShtHff SmUh)? I'M be 
stuck here forever.' - 
CootUng 




JaO mag shot of Gooding 



Smith brought me tack to jail where I was given 
my clotlws. I was then escorted around the 
premises as a guest rather than a prisoner. The 
cat. finally, wu out cithc bag. 

Inmates and guards alike were amu^d by my 
undercover work. "Way to go, man," said one 
juvenille inmate. "I hope you can give the people 
an accurate insight of jail life," said a deputy. 

I hope so, too I thought. I hope so, too. 

L he sheriff has the toughest job in the 
dty," says Smith. "You know who I get in here? 1 
get all the pec^le nobody else wants. This jail is 
the last roort." 

Smith speaks witl^ chagrin of the inmate who 
recently hung hinuelf. "You can't watch every- 
body every second," he said. "My deputies did 
take his belt away from him, but he managed to 
get it back, h was just a real unfortunate 
sittution." 

Smith defended his safety record. In his 15 
years as sheriff. Smith says just three persons 
have ever (tied while in Virginia Beach jails. 
"Remember, we get something like 7,000 
prisoners a year," he said. "I'd say the record has 
been excellent. 

"Ibe problem," Smith continued, "is that 60 
percent ^the people in this jail shouldn't even be 
here. Seventy-flve to 80 percent of the people here 
aren't real criminals; they are people who have 
made some mistakes. 

Smith's philoioi^y for running an orderly jail is 
simfrie. "I reflect a Christian attitude here by 
putting tauMtes in a fvoper setting," he said. "If 
you feed the prisoners properly, if you exercise ^ 
them, and if you give them respect, things are 



*This place Isn V screwed up. It's us. We 
are screwed up individuals. Otherwise we 
wouldn't be here, would we?' - A 
Prisoner, 



bound to run nnoothly. You can't put a man in a 
dungeon and expect hhn todumge. That's the dd 
corrections outlodt." 

The key to criminal justice. Smith said, is lot 
jails to somehow preclude recidivism. "We've got 
to find a way to make sure that these people do 
not become repeat offenders. That's the only way 
we'll ever cut down on crime." 

Incarceration, Smith concluded, is not the 
answer. "We've got to find an alternative to jail," 
he said. "I don't know the answer, but I kncnv 
there has got to be a better way." 



r— 



USE THIS FORM 
TOSUBSCRUETO 



THE yiROINIA KACH SUN 
138 ROSEMONT ROAD 

Virginia Beach, Va.« 23452 



Call Robin or Paula at 547-4571 

NAM K 

ADDRESS___ 

CHY . 

STATE,^ 

7X 9 . 



PHONE. 



WTTHIN TIDEWATER AREA 



DOne year $9.00 
OTwo yean $15.00 

OBlyl7(ABliMie! 



alLotherarea 

Done year $11.00 
UTwoyrars $17.00 

PLEASE CHECK HERE if this is 
a new subscription. D 
PLEASE CHECK HERE if you 
are now receiving THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH sun ami are renewing 
your subsoiption. Q 



Virginia Beach Sun, February 23, 1983 






Tt.-.-v 



Guide To Virginia Beach 



ntiaued 



rm 



Yesterdays* 

Treasures 



(^oilectibu 






Tom 



vf^^cA^^i^J 




Todays' 

handicrafts 
orrows' 

Heirlooms 






-3J 




uuTAxy 



/cr^y 



feU. 




yyhr^tAt^ ti^u 






pamous ^^^ sat 










R 









^fand, 



t 



><*' 



CAt»AWAV HOUSE /S i 

COKAITM |W 




k 



Carraway House 

jnS.WitchduckRoad 

delightful trip into the 
fpasi with 18th century 
I reproductions and antiques. 
] We carry something for 
f everyone from Stieff 
Pewter and Baldwin Brass 
to beautiful Madisoni 
Square furniture. Alsot 
country items lilu candksA 
folk art, primitive painA 
lings. elc...gtft items of a\ 
wide variety. Hours 10 til S 
, daily, I til 5 Sun. Closed 
iWed. 
i-lMl 



Tfrta', 






■"^ 



®i 






i<» 















/>;v 



•ffl 



L**J 



E^2l 



:sMi 




III! I 



iffi=-i«: 






':^ 



■HeiH"*"*. 



:£»**?« 



•iRw« 



A sue" f 






ofig" 



«a'f 






I 



'ii 







jp«CI 






Stt" 



Cfll- 




Al*" 
in """i 0oc*^' ,^ „ 



^/ 



n«s«'^, 




it^^l 



jordan^s country 

Shop 

corner of S^R^ 
w»d Recreation Dnve 

once there you wUlfit^J 

lL!"'^f^o.ZTed^[ 
"**' w7tt shore birds. 

4i7-3ete 




-:li 




; 1 '^t'-'^^'i/. c. , 

"'Z^-^Z,"""-'^'"" ' 



V 



H^mmGttBertes 



JorcUm *s Cmmtry Shop 
Comiryi^&mpt 



Tht Lady Peddler 
Mmmtain Orafts 



Gnmdrrut*s Ank, Inc. 
Carraway House 



^^ 



■■■■ 



1 4 Virginia Beach Sun, February 23 , 1 983 




mmf 



mmm 



Th« Church 
It Th« P«epl« 



Church Hews 



TlitP««pi« 
Am TlM Church 



A t Long 's ReliRJous Supplies 

Serving The Church Community 




By JAMES HENRY 

Twenty years ago Bill 
Long went to see a friend 
to sell him some real 
estate. Instead of beiiig the 
seller, he became the 
buyer. Bill purchased his 
friend'S' business and, 
together with his wife, 
Hazel, launched into the 
world of Christian book 
sales. 

There is no doubt in 
Bill's mind that at this 



point in his life the Lord 

was setting the course of 

his future life's work. 

Ministry To The 

Community 

Bill and Hazel 

established Long's 

Religious Supply with the 

goal of providing the 

widest variety of services 

and merchandise that the 

community had ever seen. 

The response from the 



public was overwhelming 
and the tiny business 
doubled in size within 90 
days. 

' The main store today, 
located at 2810 Monticello 
Avenue in Norfolk, yields 
over 5000 square feet of 
rdigious supplies, and gifts. 

A Full Service Store 

Jerry Long, Bill and 
Hazel's son, describes the 



Norfolk store as a "full 
service store." The idea is 
to meet the total needs of 
the community. 

Unlike many stores, 
they are able to display 
choir and pulpit robes, 
vestments and alter ware, 
and a vast selection of 
candles and related 
products. Many of the 
items featured at this store 
would be difficult to 



Hocate elsewtere in die 

Tidewater arcA. 

Thdr new Une of Video 
programs demonstrates 
the Long's continuing in- 
terest in providing a vital 
source of spiritual en- 
couragement for the 
community. There is real 
potential for the ^leo in- 
dustry as a tool for 
evangelism and family 
growth. 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 

- Christian movies, 
ten^hlng tapes, and video 
concfrts by Christian 
aniiiriiiinijfw CHail^ric at 
% n^wmotuMt rental 

UMIKt .J^r«Hi#w center 
«dhc» portton of Klected 
titl«inayl!«vie««d. 

looli awl Gift Stoiw 

Two other stores 

by Long's 

Supply are 

iQQWrtbi Vifitaia Beach. 

Oqt-^ in the Ara^na- 

PcnfjhMis area at 307 

Jload and the 

It found in the 

JBgibp Sqiiare Shopping 

These buMnesses carry a 
fiitt line of books, Bibla. 
and gifts. The one at 
KcHira Road has carefully 
davelo^ their records 
1^ posted music dqw- 
tOMSt. At thif location 
thif r^ndaiiy feature a 
jlBfii^ reloued L. P. as 
^___ of the month" at 
l^bially reduced price 
jvlhave ftniad food ntc- 

1|ft«i«Ci«4llislHw 

-Winw«»«« that vast 
niMiliM of l«her and 
mnny long days have gone 
|lt0 hiiiidinf thia ministry ' 

JUm OMiY^nt never 
jpMiv the HKt that the 
iMMt vital rcsoame Bill 
ip^HaadhnvehMiisthe 
90Bstant mcouragement 
they receive from the 
M>rd. 

I say let us put credit 
where credit is due... after 
all. Bill nevo^ intended to 
go into this business... he 
went to sell a man some 
property. 



mmmmm 



CHURCH BULLETINS 



Rrl 



•Baptist Church 
Men's eqQwBlCKkiut will be held on Feb. 27 
UlhHim.m-^G0 the church for reservations, 424- 

Mother's Momhif Out program held each 
Pri(4y'9a.ni.- 12 noon. 

Cost Qi this iNrogram is *S.00 and ceservations 
are neqeasary. Call by Thursday, 12 noon, 

A famSy fflra seriM, "God's Pattern For 
tMm» ^imMm ««ith Jthc reUtlonsUps. wives. 
hnilieKiSt AQdrw. pnmts, broken homra. 



Tht a0lcs wis be hekl on Sunday evenings at 
7:30 p.m. ^ai^Df FA. 6 and running through 
MaKi.131. 

A many will be provided. 

BniMtaUstry 

Hey %M»l Bring a ftriend on the bus and join in 
Bible Stu# and Childroi'S Worship. There's a 
treat for cKb one that rides the bus. 

Hma Gmpt Baptist Church 
On Smkv F** t1, 7 p.m., a film scries 

fea^irinc loyipe lindorf s "His Stubborn Love" 

wiU addnip wah toina as: 
How to h«v« a fuiniling marriage, overcoming 

grief and do^vcasion, surviving your suffering, 

does God an>w^ prayer and help! I'm a parent. 

GoodHfHM 

Or. mtm Bc^lind. 
from DutollDiverstty, will 
be the *tl0^ for Unten 
services 0L Good }iope 
United Methodist Church | 
February 27 through 
March 1. 



Dr. BcrgUmd will speak 
at 11:00 a.m. asd 7:30 
p.m. services on Sunday, 
Feb- 27, and again on 
Monday and Tuesday 
evenings at 7:30 p.m. 
Ihere will be special 
music at all services. 

hi 1973 Dr. Bergland 
affilliated with Duke Di- 
vinity Sdiool as Assodate 
Prcrfessor of Homiletics. 
Since 1978 he has served 




as Associate De^rxfor 
Develc^ment at Ehike.y 

The church is locatra at 
1633 Benefit Road. There 
will be a nursery provided 
for all services. Rev. 
William G. Davids cm is 
pastor. 




MM 



[L©S IM^ [LB^M 




Jesus put magnificent truths in simple terms we'll never forget. None among us wants 
to hide his i^ht under a bushel! 

But are we as quick to realize that Christ is really talking about setting the right exam- 
ple? 

Let your t^ht so shine before men that they may see your good works 
and glorify your Father which Is In h4Mven, 



Those whose light brightens life all week set an especially significant example in their 
place of worship. Apparently in the worship and work of God they recharge spiritual bat- 
teries. V 



Sunday 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


Psalms 


Luke 


1 Thessabnians 


Hebrews 


1 Peter 


1 Peter 


1 Peter 


66:8-20 


22:31-38 


3:1-5 


4:14-16 


3:12-18 


3:1-6 


4:12-19 




Make Reading Your Bible 
ADaUyHabit 



NowAyailablc 
For Rental 




VMeo Cassettes Include: 

•AHMtOobWM •nVlyGfakan 

• UoyiOillTk •AuUewl 

• ifnlnamt •Haapty 

• OnMMMC •AHyGnuit 

For BMR iaf omwdon, faiqdR at 

Longs Religious 
Supply 

'YmrCMtOmSi^ifylhadqmrters' 

aSM Mwriinl* km., Nmfeft, Va. 

(27-Ma9 


L J 




Woni 
HomeVlico 





Cedar fioad ^6i«mbii^ of yod 




tItCEDANROAO 

QREAT BRIDOE 

CHESAPEAKE. VIRGINIA 2J320 

TELEPHONE 547'MSI w M7 2233 



MoraiBg Wonhip ' --- -C-^" 

(jHBlor Ctarch) lO.M a.n. 

Evugrtlilk Service .... 7:00 p.n. 
ToMday Yoaag AdalU. . 7:30 p.n. 
WedM*4arFanilrN^hl7:30 p.m. 



ofcrQr/olk 

•^ WonUp Services 

Saaday Scliool 9:45 a.n. 

Monlat Worskip 11:00 a.ni. 

ClMfdi Tratalag 6:00 p.m. 

EvctfiV Wordi^ 7:00 p.m. 

Ken HemphilU Pastor 

312 Kcavaviac Road, Norfolk, Va., 23502 46I.M39 




^^ PROVIDENCE R0M> - VWCailA lEACM. VmCMM ^ 

(3.t.4«« SibtMv Knfl il<» ai.^ fc juii Xu*i %amd) 

Pastor: Rev. John R. Carraway 
Phone 424-2276 



Iiv0|iea Door (804) 340-1441 
I'lciiipcl 

3177 Va. Baach Mvd.. Va. Beach. Va.. 23452 



WNDAY 



..letWAM 



TUESDAY 

fciSAM mhsmay.. 

a«AM 

....ttaiAM WB>NISDAY 

tmiU MliwnfcSar»fc*....7:WPM 




OADimmSS 



SUNDAY 



kMA.M. 

»MkM. 

MtA.M. 



"1 *■ 

A 1 391 S. NewtowB Road 
^1 ^ V ^Norfolk, Va.. 23S02 



461-5041 



WEDNISDAY 

7-jtr.M. Fway W|^ 4tflHa« 
DAILY 

McMHaafi fldwrt w va* ■>>. * N#ff . 



li. L. Kay, Pastor Danny R. Thomas,^jsoctofe/totor 



Kings Grant Baptist Church 

873 Little Neck Road 
Virgitiia Beach, Virginia 



SUNDAY 

Mor^ Wonl^ . . . S40 a.B. 

Swi*V School 9:00 a.Hi. 

terf^Sckoai l«:Ma.H. 



WEDNESDAY 
Faa^ Niglit Dinner. 6M p.m. 
Gnditi CUMrcat 

Ca«*i..... 6:30 P.M. 

Prayer So-vke 6:45 p.m. 



Jerry Holcomb, Pastor 
340-0902 



CALVARY 

ASSEMKLYOFGOD 



Virgin aM#l. Vn^ma 

Leonard CaniiML Pastor 
Youth L.I«FJte Satowtay, ^ P.M. 




im mmMTmi to rwcwMmt's 
nm^MmLYcmmcH 

MFfmrCHUIKH 



Phtae W, McSwaIn, Jr. Pastor 

4U-S700 



muam&ammmuumummm 



Virginia Beach Sun, February 23. 1983 15 



Virsinia Beach Sun Hews 



■4 -■ 




UIAT Filipino Organization Names New Officers; Set Goals 




Virgiiiia Beach General Assembly Delegate Julie 
Smith inducts UIAT President hfiu Cacanindin at the 
recent Eighth Annual Inauguration and Induction Ball 
held recently in hkirfoUc About 230 people attended. 



UIAT for 1983 U headed by a lady nurse. Niu P. 
Cacanindin. 

Other c^Bcers include first vice i»esident, Artemio 
Udo; second vice president, Danilo Bdteza; third vice 
president Hector Palalay; recording secretary, Mila 
Palalay; corresponding secretaries, Fely Cslpito and 
Oandi Tan; treasurer. Fely Fontanares; assistant 
treasurer, Rose Baclig; business managers, Sid Barrera 
and \^ Marcek^ pro, Emy Pedralvez and Klar Flares; 
peace aSBctn: Art teutista, Rudy Qirdona, RoUie 
Oedo, lUidy tOomingo, Jun Edralin. Mario EsiMnoza, 
Vic Gante, MvceUno Mangming, Roger Pando, 
Andy Piaredes, Fil Singson, and Constuite Ifrbi. 

Board of Directors: Auron Aquintey. Tony Bonoan, 
Paul Quanindin, Oonrado Calpito. Nellie Dabu, Eddie 
Delacuadra, Oil Floces, Pokn Fontanares, Tessie 
Game, Roger Guerrero, Rudy Inex, Vir Madera, Jo«n 
Mallen, Justo Manglionot, Mila Rivera, Adela Sing- 
son, Venus Tomaneng and Ben >^llanueva. Advisen: 
Manuel Hipoi, MI>.,Ehner Ramiscal; Jessica Bello; 
Tete Mantilla, Jr.; James Bugtong, Jr. Auditon; Lydia 
Antolin and Elsa Bonoan. 

UIAT was one of the first regional Filipino American 
Org anizaUons formed in the Tidewater area in 1973. 
Through the ensuing years, the club has grown in size, 
influence and community involvements. Now it is the 
biggest anl m^st progressive of the regional Filipino- 
American Organizations in the locality. It branched out 
and organized iu Youth Qub in 1978, and its Senior 
Citizens Group in 1979. 

UIAT has {Htjgressed fitxn a setf-advandng to a 
sharing organization. Services to the FiUirino immun- 
ity have been volunteered by its member physkians 
aiul nurses wlu> have been condwting blood pressure 
screening for the senior citizens, entranw physical 
examinations for the sdiod children, and emptoyment 
physical examinatfons for minon seeking jobs in the 



summer. The UIAT continues to support fund raising 
activities of other organizations. Four of the five "Mrs. 
Philippines" of the Council of United Filipino 
OrganizatioD (rf Tidewater are members of UIAT; and 
the 1^0 Little Miss Philippines of the Fil-American 
Veterans Qub is a Youth member of UIAT. 

The UIAT fimd raising efforts have brought revenues 
that have nuuie possible a yearly allocation of as much 
as $4,000 to charity, schdarships. and to the building 
ftmd of the CUFOTs RiiUppine Cultural Center. 
Scholarship is not only awarded to eligible UIAT 
children but also to deserving Filipino- American 
students in Tidewater. Enrichment programs for its 
members are coordinated in lectures, seminars and 
classes including an Qocano class for the children and 
non-Oocano speaking spouses. To keep its members 
updated and informed. "Docandia News" is mailed 
every month to all members. President hfita Cacanindin 
said. "Let us work t(«ether as a team this coming 
year." She encourages participation, involvement and 
commitment of every one for the continued growth and 
oohesiveness of the organization. 

Her goals are: 

Revival of the Miss Docandia popularity contest. 

Revival (rf the Heritage Schod. 

Revival of the cultural and talent competition. Youth 
and senior ciitizens group in cultural and community 
involvement. 

C^n a "Committee Report Corner" in the 
"Docandia News." 

Mti Cacanindin set her Calendar of Events for UIAT 
in 1983, during her first Executive Committee Meeting 
on Jan. $, 1983. 

During the first general membership meeting, Jan. 
22. a seminar on tax exempticxi was held and Ben 
Aquino an accountant and tax consultant, and a UIAT 
member was the guest speaker. 



Police Precinct Rep ort 

Weekend Quiet, Except For Infant Death; Child Neglect Possible 



Fdlowing are some of the criminal activities 
rep<Hted over the weekend in each of the city's 
three police precincts. 

First rndasi, ravering 

BlMkwater, Pongo, Princess Anne 

and KempsvUlc boronghs. 

Capt. M.E. Bcanc in conawnd. 

"We've had a very unusual weekend in that it 
was so quiet for a holiday," said Sgt. J.M. 
Curran. "The weather has been so beautiful, 
maybe that's why there were so few crimes 
reported." 

Curran said there were five hit and run cases, 
which is highly unusual for a normal weekwd, he 
noted. "They were aU rather minor in that thiey 
invdved property damage and not any personal 
injuries: just a lot of messed up bushes and 
fences." 

Curran reported one residential burglary on 
Friday at 4:30 p.m. in the 3600 block of North 
landing Road. Entry was gained by removing a 



bdt from a back door and a pane of glass. A 
shotgun was stden, and the master bedroom was 
ransacked. There are no suspects, and the 
incident is being investigated by Officer S.S. 
Fisher. 

Second Picdnct, covering 
eastern half of Iimnhavta and 

Vtrglida Bcaeh boraog hs. 
Capt. W.W. Baker In CMunaad. 

"We've had a reaDy quiet weekeml," said Sgt. 
S.W. Summerlin. "There is re»lly nothing too 
spectacular to report at aD. As the weaUier starts 
to warm up, though, I expect for business to pick 
up." 

AM nrcdad, covert^ 

Biqrihte and wkstcra telf 

of lynnkavcB bORMf h. 

Capt. A.E. Saitli hi coaunairi 

."ft was a pretty busy Friday and Saturday 

night, although there was nothing (rf great note to 

report," said Sgt. G.M. VanAuken. "We had a lot 



of reports of loud parties and fighting, but all that 
is pretty routine for a hdiday weekend." 

VanAuken reported a possible case of child 
neglect. A nine-week dd infant was taken by 
pdice to Bayside Hospital, where he was 
pronounced dead on arrival. Thus far, there have 
been no arrests, but VanAuken reported that Det. 
Fred Parks is continuing his investigation. 

Unifom Divtslon Support Bureau, including 
SWAT operations civil disturbances, K-9 corps. 
iMlkopter and marine patrd, crime prevention 

and analysto. Capt. T.V. Irving In command. 

"About the only incident of any note that I am 
aware of is a bad accident we had Sunday on 
Indian River Road," said Sgt. J.E. Howland. 
'^TwosmaD children were invdved. One was in a 
protective children's seat, and he was unhurt. 
Another child was not in a seat, and he was 
seriously injured." Bdh he and the mother 
suffered head injuries and broken bones. The 
driver, the children's mother, was driving a 1980 
Honda. 



Library 
SUNIines 



1^ VIriWa BMck Lttnriai DmM 




The Friends Of The 
Library: Be A Friend 

If you happened to pass by the Wginia Beach Dc^ 
on Sunday, Feb. 13 you probably noticed a rather la^e 
crowd. N^ it wasn't a rock concert that attracted aU the 
attention, h was a book sale to be precise. And what an 
event it turned out to be. In just four hours, thousands 
of donated bocAs were sdd, oumy for as little as a dime. 



netting the Friends ova $3,000 for their efforu. 

The sponsor erf this popular sale, the Friends of the 
Virginia Beach Library, is a non-profit organization 
esublished to raise money for equipment ami services 
needed by the Virginia Beadi Public library, but not 
provided for in the city's operating budget. The group's 
officers indude a president, vice-president, treasurer 
and secretary, phis a board of directors. The board 
meets bi-monthly to oversee the organization's general 
operations. These (rf&ers are elected at a general 
maiU)ership UMeting held each si»ring. Membership 
dues and the ivoceeds ftom the book sales are the 
Friends only income. 

With the success oi the recent book sales, the 
Friends have been able to support a number of exdting 
projects. They have been able to buy special equijMnent 
for tlM system, such as the recently purchased 
electronically miked speaker's rostrum. They annually 
provide fimds, labor and support for the Hurray for the 
Bay celebration which focuses on the local importanoe 
of the Chesapeake Bay. The group is also invdved in 
the campaign for a new Central Library. 

At their recent January board meeting, the Friends 



voted to support a number of new library projects. 
Three (tf these are, in part, designed to commemo-ate 
the twentieth anniversary of the merger of Virginia 
Beach and Princess Anne County. These projects 
indude funds to cover the cost of developing an 
historical photography exhibit, support for plans to 
bring an excursion train to the Beach during the 
Neptune festival, and a grant to develop a series of 
contemporary arts programs to mark both National 
Library Week and the twentieth anniversary. Details 
concerning these new projects will be announced at a 
later date. 

The Friends of the Virginia Beach Library is an 
important and vital oxnmunity asset. Their contribu- 
tions insure continued quality library service in the city. 
If you are interested in jdning the group, please contact 
your nearest area library. This year's annual member- 
sMp meeting is tentativ^ set for Sunday, May 1st. The 
event will, as always, include a lecture by a well known 
author. 

There are so many good reasons fa- joining the 
Friends... for yourself, for dhers and for the conmiun- 
ity. So, be a Friend! 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



20 words or less - $4.40. Additional words • 22< each. 
Please print clearly using one word per box. 









































4.40 


d.62 


4.84 


5.06 


S.» 


5.50 


5.72 


5.94 


6.16 


6.38 


6.«> 



Please run ad for 

Mail to: 

Byerly Publications 
P.O.WJX1527 

Chesapeake, va. 23S20 



issues, or until cancelled ( ). 
C(»t of single ad $ 



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jap. 



Your telephone number __ — 

AU OASKHiO WK «« IM t« 0«APWa PWr AND THE ViKaMA K«W aw. 

For h^ witii vowr tiM^tad ad, |N«M caH 547-4571 . 



"The Way We Were" Is Alive 



flopping Center on Vir- 
ginia Beach Boulevard, is 
under t^w ownership. 



"The Way We 
Were," a restaurant and 
nightclub in the Aragona 

Proud Of Tourism 

Condiuwd from Pate 1 

oi Commerce President Bob Berry, Chamber of 

Commerce Executive Director Bill Center, I^vilion 

IXrector Jim Ricketu ami Qty Clerk Ruth Hodges 

Smith. 

The Mw Vtsitot bfbrmiuion Center jvoiect iiKludes 

^^)tlM renovittion of the office areas the existing Alan B. 

Sawpherd, Jr., Civic Center, better known at the Dome, 

to proviik spKe ami a separate entrance for the 

infomuttion wnter. 

Before the opening of the new center, the tourist 
information center was a small buUding in front (rf the 
Dome, kxtted tt I9th street ami Pacific Avenue. The 
new cei^r fines 19th Street, right across from a 
munic^Ml iMrkii^ kit. 

OeBeUis said the ctty had "outgrown" the previous 
facility, thia wtfrantmg the $103,000 imw modem col- 
ter. 

In tmaa oi general statistics, the viritors cemxia in 
1912 haadied 43,486 maU inquiries (60,311 in 1981); 
31,276 phone inquiries (32,481 in 1^1); 69,398 walk ins 
(68,000 in mV); iriiu thtnisandb of o^ha hiquiria iot a 
total of 160,692 inquiries handled in 1982, and 172,746 
in 1981. The center is ran by a Maff of three fuU-tinK, 
•and foiv put-lime e^pkqrees. 

From 1980 to 1982. the Virginia Beach Ofrice of 
Pul^ lafrnnMtkw rqmu that 2.S milUon tourisu OMdi 
year vteited Vk^nia Beadi, speiKiing S182.2 million in 
1980 «Kl S2I0 millian m 1981. Tourist tax revenue 
generated in 1981 totaled $19.7 temoa ami S16.2 in 
1980. 



Evelyn McGrattan, a 
Virginia Beach resident, 
recently purchased the 
establishment from its 
former owner, Tidewater 
Fishhousc Enterprises. 

"I just want peqjle to 
know that 'The Way We 
Were' is still alive and 
kicking," said McGrattan. 
"A lot of people were 
under the impression that 
we were closed down. 
Nothing could be further 
from the truth." 

McGrattan said "The 
Way We Were" still 
(rffers all (rf iu regular 
spedals, including a daily 
hot luncheon buffet and a 
weekly steamship round 
buffet on Fridays. Nghtly 
entertainment includes 
twist and jitterbug con- 
tests, as well as disc 
jockeys spinning tunes 
from the 19S0's and early 
1960's. 

"We had some really 
tttd exposure, I think, 
because we almost went 
bankru{K under (Ad man- 
agement," said McOat- 
tan. "That may have hurt 
us desperately." 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals will con- 
duct a Public H«uing on Wednoday, March 2, 1983, at 
7:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Municipal Center, Virginia Beach. Virginia. 
The sUff briefing will be at 6:45 p.m. in the City 
Manager's Conference Room. The following ap- 
plications will appear on the agenda. 

REGULAR AGENDA: " 

1. Freddie T. and Tillie M. Baker requests a variance to 
allow parking of major recreational equipment in front 
of a building instead of behiiul the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 19, Block SI, 
Section 7, Aragona, 705 DeLaura Lane. Bayside 
Borough. 

2. Wendy's International, Inc. requests a variance of 6 
parking spaces to 30 parking spaces as previously gran- 
ted by the Board of Zoning Appeals on August 2, 1978 
instead of 36 parking spaces as required (431 fquare 
foot restaurant addition) on Lots 17, 19, and 21, Block 
52, Section 2, Virginia Beach, 2201 Pacific Avenue. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

.3. Shore Drive Associates, by H. E. Perrel, General Par- 
tner/requests a variance of 4 feet in fence height to an 8 
foot fence instead of 4 feet in fence height as allowed in 
a required setback from a street (Shore Drive) on a 
3.631 Acre Parcel, Diamond Springs, Shore Drive. 
Bayside Borough. 

4. Burlage Corporation requests a variance of 5 feet to a 
"0" setback from the east property line (boardwalk) in- 
stead of 5 feet as required and to allow parking in the 
required 5 foot setback from the west property line 
(Atlantic Avenue) where prohibited and to waive the 
required landscaping in the required 5 foot setback from 
the west property line where required on Lots 1 through 
12, Block 9, Virginia Beach, 804 Atlantic Avenue. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

5. James Jangl requests a variance of 2 feet to a 6 foot 
side yard setback (south side) instead of 8 feet as 
requirni (residential addition) on Lot 11, Crystal Lake 
Acres, 5506 Meer Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

6. C & S Corporation requests a variance of 10 feet to a 
"0" side yard setback (west side) instead of 10 feet as 
required on Lot 20, Block 111, Lakewood, 13th Street. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

7 C & S Corporation requests a variance of 10 feet to a 
"0" side yard setback (west side) instoul of 10 feet as 
required on Lot 21, Block 111, Lakewood, 13th Street. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

8. C & S Corporation requnts a variance of 10 feet to a 
"0" side yard setback (west side) instead of 10 feet as 
required on the Eastern 25 feet of Lots 22 through 27, 
Block 111, Lakewood, 13th Street. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

9. Jack Rabbit Mini Storage/Hilltop requests a variance 
of 25 feet to a 10 foot setback from Jack Rabbit Court 
instead of 35 feet as required and of 2 feet in fence 
height to a 6 foot foioe instead of a 4 foot fence as 
allowed in a required setback from a street on Lot 6, 
Hilltop, Jack Rabbit Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 

10. John A. and Jane D. Hafling requests a variance of 
3 parking spaces to "0" parking spaces instead of 3 
parking spaces as required for a duplex on Lot 5, Block 
12, Ubermeer, 5300 Atlantic Avenue. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

1 1 . William E. Wood and Associate Realtors requests a 
variance of 23 feet to a 12 foot setback from Indian 
River Road instead of 35 feet as required (commercial 
addition) on a Parcel, Acredale, 5308 Indian River 
R(Md. Kempsville Borough. 

12. Helen L. Foos requests a variance of 2 feet in fence 
height to 6 feet in height instead of a 4 foot fence as 
allowed in a required front yard setback on Lots 1 , 2, 1 1 
and 12, Block 15, Croatan, Chautaugua Avenue. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

13. B. B. Bryan requests a variance of 1 foot to a 9 foot 
side yard setback (north side) and of 1.5 foot to an 8.5 
foot side yard setback (south side) instead of 10 feet 
each as required (placement of mobile home) on Lot 6, 
Block F, Cardinal EsUtes, 1320 Skylark Drive. Princess 
Anne Borough. 

14. Sunrise Associates, II requests a variance of 3.5 feet 
in building height to 38.5 feet in height instead of 35 feet 
in building height as allowed and of 2 feet to a 16 foot 
side yard adjacent to a street (58th Street) instead of 18 
feet as required (deck) on Lot A, Block 7, Ubermeer, 
Southwest Corner of Ocean Avenue and 58th Street. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

15. Lawrence R. and Leslie P. Siegd requests a variance 
of 7 feet to a 13 foot side yard setback (west side) in- 
stead of 20 feet as required (swimming pool) on Lot 48, 
Section 1, Redwood Farm, 1292 Southfield Place. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

16. Texaco, Inc. requests a variance of 10 feet to a 25 
foot setback from the right of way line established on 
th^ Master Street ami Highway Plan as adopted by City 
Council instead of a 35 foot setback as required (South 
l^laza Trail) and of 48 square feet off sign area to 594 
square feet of sign area instead of 546 square feet of sign 
area as allowed and of 9 signs to 14 signs instead of 5 
signs as allowed on a Parcel, Section 1, Princess Anne 
Plaza, 310 Rosemont Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 

17. Texaco, Inc. by James H. Flippen, Jr. requests a 
variance of 11 signs to 16 signs instead of 5 signs as 
allowed on Lots 1 and 9 and 11 through 18. Block 5, 
PtcaR Gardens, 3600 Holland Road. Princess Anne 
Borough. 

IS.Texaco, Inc. by James H. Flippen, Jr. requcsU a 
variaiKe of 152 square feet of sipi area to 602 square 
fMt of sign vea iittt^d of 450 square feet of sign arm 
as allowed and of 10 ugns to 15 signs instead of 5 signs^ 
u altowed on Part of Pared A, Plat of Property of^ 
Ge<vg$ F. Dvden, Jr.. Great Neck Meado«^, 1280 
Great Neck Road. Lynnhaven Botou^. 
19. Tetao), Im:. by James H. ¥^ppe&, Jr. requests a 
variaiKC of 129 square feet of si^ area to 602 square 
feet of sign area instead of 473 square feet of sign area 
as allow^ and of 10 signs to 15 signs instead of 5 signs 
as allowed on Parcel A, LiUel Farms, Inc., 1900 Cento-- 
vilk Turnpike. Konpsville Borough. 

DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1 . John W. KeUam requests a variamx of 13 feet to a 5 
foot side yard adjacxnt to a street (Fentms Avenue) in- 
stead of 18 feet as m]uired and of 4 feet to a 4 foot sick 
yard setlwck (East S(k) iwtead of 8 feet as required 



^mmmmmmm 



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16 Virginia Beach Sun, February 23, 1983 



Vir3inia Beach Public Notices 



NkNeNMring 



Public HMring 



PiUkllMMta NMeNMrtag 



1 hMeNMrlif 


■ IR^Rw B^^P^n ^H^ft 1 



nMW nMni^ 



; (accessory building - storage shed) on Part of Lot 21, 
Block 8, Chesapeake Shores, Fentress Avenue. Bayslde 
Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 
Garland L. Isdell 
Secretary 
185-13 2T 2/23 VB 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Planning Commission will hold a 

.Public Hearing on Tuesday, March 8, 1983, at'l2:00 
Noon in the Council Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Princess Anne Courthouse, Virginia Beach, 

;. Virginia. A briefing session will be held at 9:30 a.m. in 

: the Planning Department Conference Room, 

I Operations Building. PLANNING COMMISSION 
ACTION IS NOT A FINAL DETERMINATION OF 

• THE APPLICATION, BUT ONLY A RECOMMEN- 
DATION TO THE CITY COUNCIL AS THE 
VIEWPOINT OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION. 
FINAL DETERMINATION OF THE APPLICATION 
IS TO BE MADE BY CITY COUNCIL AT A LATER 
DATE, AFTER PUBLIC NOTICE IN A 

i NEWSPAPER HAVING GENERAL CIRCULATION 

: WITHIN THE CITY. The following applications will 
appear on the agenda: 
DEFERRED BY PLANNING COMMISSION FOR 30 

, DAYS ON FEBRUARY 8, 1983: 

' 1. An Ordinance upon Application of R. G. Moore for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to R- 

' 6 Residential District on certain property located on the 
West side of Salem Road beginning at a point 1640 feet 
North of Elbow Road, running a distance of 379.97 feet 
along the West side of Salem Road, running a distance 
of 3688 feet along the Northern property line, running a 
distance of 1112.80 feet along the Western property 
line, running a distance of 2347.58 feet along the 
Southern property line, running a distance of 554.75 
feet in a Northerly direction and running a distance of 
703.29 feet in an Easterly direction. Said parcel contains 

66.2 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of R. G. Moore for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 Residential District to O- 
1 Office District on certain property located on the 
South side of Bonney Road beginning at a point 600 feet 
more or less East of Witchduck Road, running a distan- 

. ce of 195.3 feet along the South side of Bonney Road, 
; running a distance of 459.5 feet along the Eastern 
'. property line, running a distance of 186.9 feet along the 
Southern property line and running a distance of 514.9 
feet along the Western property line. Said parcel con- 
tains 2. 1 1 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Application of Garland E. Ben- 
Wtu Jr., and David M. and Nellie J. Callahan for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 Residential District to B- 

.2 Community-Business District on the South side of 
i Haygood Road on Lot 30, Block 42, Section Nine, Part 
: Two, Aragona Village. Said parcel is located at 4909 

Haygood Road and contains 8575 square feet. 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

4. Application of Thomas C. Shubert, Jr., and Jane K. 
Shubert for the discontinuance, closure and bandon- 
ment of a portion of Lauderdale Avenue beginning at 
the Western boundary of Velzy Avenue and running in a 
Westerly direction along the Southern boundary of Lots 
17, 18, 19, and 20, Block 16, Chesapeake Park. Said 
parcel contains 6764.2 square feet. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

5. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
•regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
-ce, Subdivision for Mrs. J. James Davis. Property 

located at the Northwest corner of Pinewood Road and 

^Holladay Point. Plats with more detailed information 
are available in the Department of Planning. 

; VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

; 6. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Roy G. Farless and Richard W. Set- 
zer. Property located on the North side of Scott Bend 
Lane, 200 feet West of Garcia Drive. Plats with more 
detailed information are available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
7. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 

fregard to certaih elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 

■ce. Subdivision for Delia Lee Barton. Property located 
on the South side of Old Virginia Beach Road, 75 feet 

.East of Realty Avenue. Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation, are available in the Department of Planning. 

-LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

■ 8. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Newsome Farm Associates. Proper- 
ty located at the Northwest corner of Connie Lane and 
Lawrence Drive. Plats with more detailed information 
are available in the J0epartment^f Planning. BAYSIDE 

■ BOROUGH. f ( 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION: 

9. An Ordinance upon Application of Dr. Robert W. 
Waddell, Trustee for Virginia Beach Orthopedic 
Associates Employee Profit Sharing Plan for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

^CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Community-Business 
iDistrict to A-3 Apartment District on certain property 
ilocated on the Northwest side of Witchduck Road 
ibeginning at a point 490.45 feet Southwest of Ferry 
iPlantation Road, running a distance of 203.77 feet 
:along the Northwest side of Witchduck Road, running a 
idistance of 494.99 feet in a Northwesterly direction, 

running a distance of 235 feet in a Northeasterly direc- 
tion and running a distance of 408.09 feet in a 
"Southeasterly dir«:tion. Said parcel contains 2.476 

acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

10. An Ordinance upon Application of Margaret R. 
Mills and Garphine E. Smith for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from R-6 
Residential District to A-I Apartment District on cer- 
tain property locatea 412. ?> teet bast of Lawrence Drive 
."beginning at a point 304 feet North and Daniel Smith 
Soad, running a distance of 333.50 feet in a Nor- 
theasterly direction, running a distance of 572 feet in a 



Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 356.38 
feet in a Southwesterly direction and running a distance 
of 570 feet more or less in a Northwesterly direction. 
Said parcel contains 5 acres more or less. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

1 1 . An Ordinance upon Application of S & B Proper- 
ties, Inc., for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-8 Residential District to B2 
Community-Business District on certain property 
located on the West side of Centerville Turnpike begin- 
ning at a point 503.72 feet South of Kempsville Road, 
running a distance of 207 feet along the West side of 
Centerville Turnpike, running a distance of 118.08 feet 
along the Southern property line, running a distance of 
229.64 feet in a Northwesterly direction, running a 
distance of 199.01 feet in a Northeasterly direction and 
running a distance of 114.47 feet in. a Southeasterly 
direction. Said parcel contains 1.06 acres. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

12. An Ordinance upon Application of Holland Proper- 
ties Associates for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from I-l Light In- 
dustrial District to A-3 Apartment District on certain 
property located 200 feet Nqrth of Holland Road 
beginning at a point 906.40 feet West of Edwin drive, 
ruiftiing a distance of 300 feet along the Southern 
proberty lijne, running a distance of 648.90 feet along 
the Western property line, running a distance of 292 feef 
along the Northern property line and running a distance 
of 6|76.20 feet along the Eastern property line. Said par- 
cel Jcontains 4.5 acres more or less. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

13. An Ordinance upon Application of Peterson 
Associates, Inc., a Virginia Corporation, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Community-Business 
District to A-1 Apartment District on certain property 
located on the West side of Kempsville Road beginning 
at a point 690 feet South of Indian River Road, running 
a distance of 122.50 feet along the West side of Kem- 
psville Road, running a distance of 270 feet more or less 
in a Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 95 
feet in a Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 
500 feet more or less in a Northwesterly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 3^0 feet more or less in a Nor- 
theasterly direction, running a distance of 300 feet more 
or less in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance 
of 200 feet in a Southwesterly direction and running a 
distance of 350 feet more or less in a Southeasterly 
direction. Said parcel contains 4.5 acres. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

14. An Ordinance upon Application of Peterson 
Associates, Inc., a Virginia Corporation, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from R-8 Residential District to A- 
I Apartment District on certain property located 300 
feet more or less West of Kempsville Road beginnii^ at 
a point 900 feet more or less South of Indian River 
Road, running a distance of 800 feet more or less in a 
Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 500 leet 
more or less in a Northwesterly direction, running a 
distance of 800 feet more or less in a Northeasterly 
direction and running a distance of 500 feet more or less 
in a Southeasteriy direction. Said parcel contains 9,908 
acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

15. An Ordinance upon Application pf Robert W. 
Waddell, M.D., Trustee of Virginia Beach Orthopedic 
Assoc., Inc. Employee Profit Sharing Plan for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to O- 
1 Office District on certain property located on the 
South side of Old Donation Parkway beginning at a 
point 1049.26 feet West of First Colonial Road, running 
a distance of 813.73 feet along the South side of Old 
Donation Parkway, running a distance pf 744.19 feet in 
a Southeasterly direction and running a distance of 
481.91 feet in a Northeasterly direction. Said parcel con- 
tains 4 acres more or less. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

16. An Ordinance upon Application of BOSDIM and 
Associates for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to 
R-8 Residential District on certain property located on 
the North side of South Lynnhaven Road beginning at a 
point 1 16 feet East of Pritchard Road, running a distan- 
ce of 438.65 feet along the North side of South Lynn- 
haven Road, running a distance of 744.08 feet along the 
Eastern property line, running a distance of 450.58 feet 
along the Northern property line and running a distance, 
of 720.62 feet along the Western property line. Said 
parcel contains 7.2 acres. LYF^HAVEN BOROUGH. 

17. An Ordinance upon Appiibation of Lynnhaven Nor- 
th Associates for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from I-l Light Industrial District 
to B-2 Community District on parcels on the West side 
of Lynnhaven Parkway, North of Avenger Drive. 
PARCEL 1: Located 589.97 feet West of Lynnhaven 
Parkway beginning at a point 1300 feet more or less 
North of Avenger Drive, running a distance of 1412.09 
feet along the Northern property line, running a distan- 
ce of 634.43 feet along the Western property line, run- 
ning a distance of 134.68 feet in a Southeasterly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 190 feet in a Northeasterly 
direction, running a distance of 217.51 feet in a South- 
easterly direction, running around a curve in a North- 
easterly direction a distance of 655.90 feet and running a 
distance of 300 feet in a Northerly direction. 
PARCEL 2: Located 1732.50 feet West of Lynnhaven 
Parkway beginning at a point 250 feet more or less Nor- 
th of Avenger Drive, running a distance of 365 feet 
along the Southern p.--perty line, running a distance of 
357.81 feet along the ' 'estern property line, running a 
distance of 209.23 feet m an Easterly direction, running 
a distance of 215 frat in a Southerly direction, running a 
distance of 165.71 feet in an Easterly direction^nd run- 
ning a distance of 84.35 feet in a Southeriy direction. 
PARCEL 3: Located 399.99 feet West of Lynnhaven 
Parkway beginning at a point 250 feet more or less Nor- 
th of Avenger Drive, running a distance of 1 1 1 1 . 16 feet 
along the Southern property line, running a distance of 
547.70 feet along the Western property line, running a 
distance of 386.94 feet along the Northern property line, 
running a distance of 504.13 feet in a Southeasterly 
direction and running a distance of 1 72. 1 6 feet along the 
Eastern property line. Said parcels contain 24.2538 
acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 



CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Community-Business 
District to I-l Light Industrial District on Parcels 
located Wnt of Lynnhaven Prkway, North and South 
of Avenger Drive, and on the East side of S. Lynnhaven 
Road, North of Homespun Avenue. 
PARCEL 1: Located on the West side of Lynnhaven 
Parkway beginning at a point 243.99 feet North of 
Avenger Drive, running a distance of 399.99 feet along 
the Northern property line, running a distance of 239.71 
itfX along the Western property line, running a distance 
of 77.36 feet in an Easterly direction, running a distance 
of 210 feet in a Northerly direction, running a distance 
of 175 feet in an Easterly direction, running a distance 
of 188 feet in a southerly direction, running a distance 
of 155 feet in an Easterly direction and running a 
distance of 243.99 feet more or less along the West side 
of Lynnhaven Parkway. 

PARCEL 2: Located on the West side of Lynnhaven 
Parkway beginning at a point 498. 10 feet South of 
Avenger Drive, running a distance of 705.76 feet along 
the Southern property line, running a distance of 73.97 
feet in a Northwesterly direction, running around a cur- 
ve in a Northeasterly direction a distance of 1 100 feet 
more or less and running a distance of 498. 10 feet ^ong 
the West side of Lynnhaven Parkway. 
PARCEL 3: Located on the East side of S. Lynnhav^ni 
Road beginning at a point 100 feet more or less North oi 
Homespun Avenue, running a distance of 914.35 feet 
along the East side of S. Lynnhaven Road, running a 
distaiKe of 544.30 feet in an Easterly direction, running 
a distance of 408.89 feet in a Southerly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 165 feet in an Easterly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 170 feet in a Northerly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 200 feet in an Easterly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 238.89 feet in a Northeriy direction, 
running a distance of 221.35 feet in an Easterly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 172.30 feet in a South- 
westerly direction, running a distance of 65 feet in a 
Westerly direction, running a distance of 3%.65 feet in 
a Southerly direction, running a distance of 120 feet in 
an Eaisterly direction, running a distance of 166.11 feet 
in a Southeasterly direction, funning a distance of 100 
feet in a Southerly direction and running a distance of 
979.46 feet along the Southern property line. Said par- 
cels contain 24.2536 acres. LYNNHAVEN AND 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGHS 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

19. An Ordinance upon Application of Patrick L. 
Standing for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 3 
duplexes at the Southeast intersection of Lakewood Cir- 
cle and Mediterranean Avenue on Lots B, C & D, Lot 
104, Lakewood. Said parcels contain 16,161.7 square 
feet. VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

20. An Ordinance upon Application of Creative 
Displays, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a 12' X 25' billboard on property located at the 
Southwest corner of Princess Anne Road and Seaboard 
Road, running a distance of 302.8 feet along the West 
side of Seaboard Road, running a distance of 280 feet 
more or less along the Southern property line, running a 
distance of 360 feet more or less along the Western 
prt)perty line and running a distance 190 feet more or 
less along the South side of Princess Anne Road. Said 
parcel contains 1.78 acres more or less. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

21. An Ordinance upon Application of Shore Drive 
Associates for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
mini-warehouses on certain property located on the 
South side of Shore Drive beginning at a point 259.32 
feet East of Diamond Springs Road, running a distance 
of 509.46 feet along the South side of Shore Drive, run- 
ning a distance of 287.83 feet along the Eastern property 
line, running a distance of 640.81 feet along the 
Southern property line and running a distance of 276. 14 
feet along the Western property line. Said parcel con- 
tain 3.631 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

22. An Ordinance upon Application of Thrift Car Care, 
IiJC, for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
automobile and small engine repairs on certain property 
located at the Southeast comer of Haygood Road and 
Aragona Boulevard, running a distance of 150 feet 
along the South side of Haygood Road, running a 
distance of 150 feet along the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 150 feet along the Southern 
property line and running a distance of 150 feet along 
the East side of Aragona Boulevard. Said parcel con- 
tains 22.500 square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

23. An Ordinance upon Application of Waco Equip- 
ment Company for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a bulk storage yard on certain property located at 
the Northwest comer of Rouse Drive and Mac Street, 
mnning a distance of 207.62 feet along the North side of 
Rouse Drive, running a distance of 218.4 feet in a Nor- 
thwesterly direction, running a distance of 100 feet in a 
Southwesterly direction, mnning a distance of 88.35 
feet in a Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 
330.61 feet along the Northern property line and mn- 
ning a distance of 290.16 feet ajong the West side of 
Mac Street. Said parcel contains 1.64 acres. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 



18. An Ordinance upon Application of Lynnhaven Nor- 
th Associates for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 



24. An Ordinance upon Apphcation of Ronald G. and 
Jeanne A. Komomik for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a home occupation (silk screen printing, 
numbering and baimer making) on Lot 29, Block H-1, 
Bellamy Manor. Property located at 1140 Cresthaven 
Lane and contains 14,800 square feet more or less. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

25. An Ordinance upon Application of Virignia Beach 
Racquet Club North Associates for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for renovation and expansion of existing 
r^reational facilities to include locker rooms and grill 
on certain property located on the East side of Thomas 
Bishop Lane beginning at a point 560 f^t more or \es& 
North of Great Neck Road, mnning a -distance of 760 
feet more or less along the East side of Thomas Bishop 
Lane, mnning a distance of 130 feet in a southeasterly 
dilution, mnning a distance of 300 feet in ah Easterly 
direction, mnning a distance of 330 f^t more or less in 
a Southerly direction, mnning a distance of 860 feet 
more or less in an Easterly direction, running a distance 
of 260 fi^ more or less in a Southwesterly dir^rtion and 
running a distance of 1030 feet more or less in a 
Westerly direction. Said parcel contains 9.379 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

26. An Ordinance upon Application of Jack Rabbit 
Self-Storage/Hilltop for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for mini-warehouss on (%rtain prt^ierty 



located on the West side of Jack Rabbit Road beginning 
at a point 330 feet more or less South of Donna 
Boulevard, mnning a distance of 130 feet more or less 
along the West side of Jack Rabbit Ro«l, mnning a 
distance of 174.98 feet along the Southern propaly line, 
mnning a distance of 119.43 feet along the Western 
property line and mnning a distance of 174.40 feet 
along the Northern property line. Said parcel contains 
19,166 square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
STREET CLOSURE: 

27. Application of Thomas G. and Irma C. Harty uid 
Thomas'M: and Rita K. Vojtek for the discontinuance, 
closure and abandonment of a portion of Lynn Shores 
Drive beginning at the Southwest intersection of Lynn 
Shores Drive and Rumford Lane, mnning a distance of 
1 6 i. 34 feet along the West side of Lynn Shores Drive, 
mnning a distance of 35 feet more or less along the 
Southern property line, mnning a distance of 208 feet 
more or less along the Western property line and mn- 
ning a distance of 20.87 feet more or less along the 
South side of Rumford Lane. Said parcel contains 6,093 
square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
Plats with more detailed mformation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited to attend. 
Robert J. Scott 
Director of Planning 
187-7 2T 3/2 VB 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Stationr Virginia Beach. Virginia on Monday, March 
14, 1983, at 2:00 p.m. at which time the followmg ap- 
plications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION; 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

1 . An Ordinance upon Application of Tidewater Impor- 
ts. Inc.. for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from O-l Office District to B-2 
Community Business District on certain property 
located at the Northern extremity of Cranston Lane, 
mnning a distance of 250.58 feet along the Southern 
property line, running a distance of 338.36 feet along 
the Western property line, mnqing a distance of 70 feet 
in a Southeasterly direction, miming a distance of 
161.76 feet in a Southerly direction, mnning around a 
curve in a Southeasterly direction a distance of 241.14 
feet and mnning a distance of 12.86 feet in a Southerly 
direction. Said parcel contains 30.579 square feet. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of Nelson P. Tib- 
bitt, Jr.. for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Conununity-Business 
District to A-2 Apartment District on certain property 
located at the Northwest intersection of Oconee Avenue 
and Byrd Lane, mnning a distance of 2^ feet more or 
less along the North side of Oconee Avenue, mnning a 
distance of 450 feet along the Western property line, 
mnning a distance of 480 feet more or less along the 
Northern property line, mnning a distance of 330 feet 
more or less along the Eastern property line and nmning 
a distance of 2(X) feet more or less in a Southwesterly 
direction. Said parcel contains 4 acres more or less. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMITS: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

3. An Ordinance upon application of Fred H. Feller for 
a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for recreational 
facilities of an outdoor nature (fishing) on cotain 
property located on the Southeast portion of Lot B-20 
as shown on the plat entitled "Re-Plat of Rudee 
Heights, Princess Anne County, Virginia", dated 
December, 1950. and which is located on the East side 
of Southside Road. Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the Department of Planning. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon Application of Gene S. Meekins 
T/A Jamco, for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
an auto parts store and muffler shop on certain property 
located on the South side of Laskin Road beginning at a 
point 250 feet more or less West of Village Drive, mn- 
ning a distance of 130 feet along the South side of 
Laskin Road, nmning a distance of 2S0 feet along the 
Western property line, running a distance of 130 feet 
along the Southern property line and mnning a distaiKe 
of 250 feet along the Eastern property line. Said parcel 
is located at 1837 Laskin Road and contains 32,500 
square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

5. An ordinaire upon ^jpUcation of George Tony 
Smith for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a single 
family dwelling in the AG-1 Agricultural District on car- 
tain property located 600 feA South of Sandbridge 
Road b^iiming at a point 600 feet East of New Bridge 
Road, running a distance of 730 feet more or less along 
the Northern property line, mnning a distance of 100 
feet more or less along the Eastern property Une. run- 
ning a distant of 860 feet more or l«s along the 
Southern property line and nmning a distance of 370 
feet more or less along the Western prqperty line. Said 
parcel contains 8.4 acres more or less. PRINCESS AN- 
NE BOROUGH. 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

6. App^ from Decisitm of Administrative Officers in 
regard to ^rtain elonents of the Subdivison Ordinance^ 
Subdivision for Runnington Investment CfHporation. 
Prc^)erty locat^l on the West »de of West Laiw, 886.87 
feet North of Virginia Beach Boulevard. Plats with 
more detailed information are available in tlw Dqiar- 
tmcnt of Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
AMENDMENT: 

7. Motion of the Piawiing Onnmlssion of the City of 
Virginia B«ich. Virgima, to amend aiui r^vdain Sec- 
tion 4.2(a) of the Subdivison Ordinance potaiung to 
easements. More detalkd infcmnation is' available in the 
DeiMUtment of Plumii^E. 

Plats with more (totalled infonnaticm are available io the 

Department of Plai^^, 

All inter«t»i pei^ou are invited to attOKi. 

Ruth Hodges Smith 

OtyCte-k 

187-8 2T 3/2 VB _, 



- *■ 



■■■■laMMBMBBHiBBlBMBBB 



\X 



Virginia Beach ^n,Febn»ry 23, 1983 17 



Classified Ads 




4.AirtM 



ll.PMltiMnWMrtatf 



IS. 



22.J««*lry 



33. ApartMMits Far Raat 



4v. sa^ncat 



D 



JUNK CARS AND TRUCKS - 

Towed free. Some bought. QUI 
485-1961 or 485-5«59. 

ITFN 

NiXD 28 people who would like 
to lose 7 to 15 pounds the 1st 
week and 5 to 7 pounds per week 
thereafter. Only th scrioui need 
W apply. Call 487-9605. 
I4T^23 

XMAS BILLS 

Or Any PnrpoM Rarity LwuH 

VlrgiBla-North QuolbH 

Or Maiy Other Stalii 

WITH GOOD CREDIT 

UP TO 100% OF VALUE 

REHNANCE MORTGAGfS 

bl,2ad,or3rd'i 
In (one cases interest aa low as 

12% 

111. a M. MoMiilM ip la M m. 

BAD CREDIT 

UP TO 10% OF VALUE 
GUARANTEED APPROVAL 

WltHsaffidcatcvrity 
STOP FORECLOSURES 
PAY IRS4UDGf»fENTS 

TURN£DDOWN 

BY OIHERSr DON*TGnrEUP 

WC tISVt rllVMV uHPill 

COMMERCIAL 

Property Lmm AIM AvAMa 

ALSO WILL WY 

MORTGAGE NOfm 

OPENTILLini 

SAT. It TILL 2 PM 

CAPITAL AssoaAm 

499-llS4,4ai-CM 
,._ IJQI 

THE LOCK 8Hf» AndlUop • 

2981 South MUitary HWiwqr, 
Chesapeake, Va., 483-1950. 
Complete 24 hour locksmidi va- 

vice. 

1«T^23 



INCOME TAX ■ and Accouni- 
lag (indoding tax tudits). Mario 
Venditti. fonnfr Revedue Agent, 
«3707 Vi^nia Beach Bhrd. (near 
Rosemont Rd.) Call MO^m. 

ITFN 



NEED CREDIT HELP? 

Recdve a Mastercard or Visa, 
Guaranteed, Nobody refused, 
for free brochure send S.A.S.E. 
to Hoiae of Credit, Box 280570, 
Dallas. Texas 75228, or call I - 
214-324-5944. 
24T3-16 

NEED CREDIT HELP? ■ 

Receive a Mastercard or Visa, 
Ouaranteed, Nobody refused; 
for free brochure smd S.A.S.E. 
to House of Credit, Box 280570. 
Ctellu, Texas 75228 or call 
Anytinw 1-214-324-5944. 

^ 24T3/16 



A MASTERCARD' 

OR Vba. Oattuteed, nobody 
refused; tat free brochure call 
Home of Credit, toO fnc 1-80<P 
442-1531 aaythne. 

21TN 



PARTS ■ 1968 Skybtfk Buick, 
excellent engine and tran- 
smission. $75 takes the whole 
car. Call Wedn^day thru Sun- 
day at 427-1901. 
4TFN 

TOYOTA ■ 1978, Corolla, 
42,000 miles. Good condition. 
$2950. Call 486-1312. 

.41T2-23 

UNCOLN - 1975. Town Car, 
excellent condition. $2850. call 
547-4825. 

44T3-23 

CADILLAC - 1976 Coupe 
DeVille, Excellent condition. Ex- 
Ua, extra clean. Call 428-0068. 

/ 44T3-2 



/I 

/ i 

VmX DO DMNVING - In my 

Deq> Creek (TijivelCTS Itailcr 

Court) home. ^/Uie |riece or flat 

rate. CaU 485-2242. 

II4T3-2 

NURSES AIDE - Experienced, 
would like private duty hoqiital 
care, certified, refoenco. Hwc 
own traa^ortatioa. Qdl 399- 
4819. 

I14T3-2 



DISHWASHER - Sears Ken- 
morie, portable. Good ctmdition. 
S100.CaU3S7-O275. 

■ 15 IT 2-9 

STOVES • Electric, clean, 
guaranteed, S50 and up. Call 
anytiine. 857-6552. 

154T3-2 



It-AiUdasFartala 



12. 



7. Matorcyclas 



3.UatAFa«i4 



LOST • Manila ft^kkr with old 
pictures. Great scatimental 
^vlnc. Loit Ofwt Bridae Sht^- 
piaa Cealtr ■«. Rnnni. CaO 
421-»H. 

34TS/M 



SUZUKI - 1981, RM-100. Dirt 
Kke, only ridden a couple of 
months. Good condition. $700 
OT best offer. Call days 545-4944 
or evenings 547-4779. 
74T3-2 



UNBEUEVAUf Oppmtunity 
- With Franklin Marketing 
Company. Extra income, no 
risk, minimum monthly invest- 
ment for super returns. Call 
Wayne at 547-2059. 
12 4T 3-16 

OWN YOUR OWN LANES 

and Young Man's Jean-Spwta- 
wear or Children's Sht^. Of- 
fering all nationally known 
brands such as Jordache, Chic. 
Lee. Levi. Vawiertiat. CaMa 
Klae. Wmvte. 8Up '■ Skura. 



SWIMMNG POOL SLIDE - 

S250, Oatvinized Big T Gym set, 
S20. 3 by 3 black slate btack 
board. SIS. CaU'420-7719. 
16TFN 

QfCTRlC HOSPITAL REO- 

Conqrietc with mattrcu, 3 levd 
buttons, bead, foot A hdghth of 
bed. Excellent condition. Grig. 
$1200. One yw old $600. Com- 
mode Chair -excellent condition 
$35.00. Call 427-1901 Wed. thru 
Son. 
16-TFN 

ACETYLENE TORCH KIT ■ 

including bottles. $123. CaU 547- 
2916. 

MIT 2.23 



LADOS JEWELRY FOR SALE 

One ladies cocktail ring with 45 
diamonds and is 14 carat yellow 
gold. Also a 14 carat white golft 
23 jewel ladies Bulova watch. 
Ring appraised at $3400 and 
watch appnused at $1900. Will 
sell dthCT for half the appraised 
value. CaU 547^0858 after 5:00 
P"- 22TFN 

14 iT GOLD HEART • With 
Diamond pendent, purchased at 
Fine Jewlery Store. Never worn. 
Call 623-4040. 

22 4T 3-19 



GREEN RUN • In Virginia 
Beach, Apartments for adults. I 
and 2 bedroom Garden Style and 
2 bedroom townhouses. We pay 
heat and hoi water. The Pines. 
Call 468-2000. 
JJTTN 

APARTMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS - Great Bridge. 4 
locations, one and 2 bedroom 
apartroenu. From $260. Rental 
office. 482-3373. eveninp 482- 
1492. 369 Johnstown Road. 

33TFN 



ALL TYPES ALTERNATOilS 

and startcn repaired. Battkfidd 
Auto Electric. CaU 347-3230. 

40-TFN 



"T- 



42.CIMCif« 



D 



BARYl rniNG . Regular basis, 
exeelleat care, hot lunches, and 
snacks. Lots of attention. 
Spanow Road area, call 420- 
4259. 

. 424T3-16 



24.WaRtMlTal«y 



36.iaaiestata 



41. CafpsRliy I 



TABLE SAW - Prefer carbide 
blade. Will pay cash. Call 627- 
5020 8 - 5 p.m. Ask for Lisa. 

CASH PAID - Virginia Beach 
Antique Co. pays cuh for an- 
tiques, old furniture, clocks, 
glassware, lamps, china, oil pain- 
tinp. oriental rugs, old iron and 
anliqiie toys. We buy one piece . 
or caiireilKMBcfiills. Also. ^fucA 
Cril 4224477 

34TFM 



HOME RENTALS • UrgenUy 
needed in the Tidewater area. Let 
us handle your property fw per- 
sonal attention. Call Ellen at 
481-3177 or 481-0612. Letour- 
neou Realty. 

364T-3-23 



CARPENTRY. PAINTING, 
ROCMING - and all types of 
maintenance. Storm windows, 
gutters and screens repaired. 
Free estimate. Sanders Con- 
struction. 4a>4433. 

4nTN 



47. 



38. Habia Haaaa 



D 



HOLIDAV - I97S, occUent 
3 bsdraMl. 2 b«h. 



BdMioa. dMfc Mac T4ap^ 4 




i 



GEORGETOWN ^ 
POINT 

Home sites for sale 

People Planning 

Homes & Custom 

Builders 

SALES OFFICE 
333 Providence Rd. 

CAIL 464-9317 



— "I- 



ExocUmt coaditkM. SI0.700. 
CfeD3l7-«a4. 
44T3-9 

CORVETTE - 1912. wUte with 
■ red interior, smoked glass tops, 
ftiOy aqn^ped. AU availiri>le op- 
tioas.Oril4^3637. 
44T^23 

POKD - 1971, LTD 0. radio, 
viiqrl iwa, autoeiatfc. dean, 
aood ooaffiloB, retail book vahw 
t2925. oUag S2.200. CaU 482- 
2246. 

44T3-2 

FORD ' 1968 Mustang, fastback. 
Motor. transmisdcMi, and rear 
end in good shapes. Body needs 
repaii. $800 negotiable. CaU 583- 
2340. 
44T^23 

DODGE - 1973, Charger, 
autonuttic, pow« stecrii^ and 
brpkcs. air. Must see. $1,250. 
Call 833-2033. 

44T^23 




HOME 

IMPROVEMENT 

Rooai •iAUoM for all 

parposei. Coavcrt 

^uagti raise donMri. 

Any type of inprov- 
mcBt. Bathrooio and 
KitelM fenod^i^. 

R.H.BLACX 

3f7*717t 




$795.00 

fCAil. 700419 

STATE LINE BUILDERS 

Gardga • Utility Bams • Any ^izg 

HIgliway 16S _„„ 

Moyock, N.C. 279« «M LEWIS 

{919)43MnS HtM»e:(IM)421.25Si 



Bunker Ramo 
Electronic Systems 

AlLtED 



SOFTWARE 
ENGINEERS 

Norfolk, VA. 

Bunkw Homo Bacfronic Syrtamt, on AWad 

Company, te looUns *« So^*^. N^ 
DMrs lor proiodt band la •♦• Norfolk 
ona. Sw^uM canJdo iw wM kova 2- 
10 ytan of mhy u a wpwtar syHaim onoly- 
tis o«d proyanHNhio. «>^11 «««« 
MACHO n ond fOimiAN «ndar IAS 
prafanad. Eapariwea t*k 000 maaiooa 
iiiBiiftm ■iiirfaim Doia laaa dadon aad 
wtoQa daairoUa WSS ar U Ceaipiitar 
Sciaim or oqirivriaRl 
Bunlw Itano e^M oa 
ftHpodngaai 
rMwma «i«k salary Matary lai 



sifir la 



PART TIME - Docs travel I 

exciting? No experience 
necessary, we train, Norfoft In- 
ternational Air Terminal. Sun- 
day, Feb. 27, 1983. For appoin- 
tment call 482-3633. 

10 IT 2-23 

SINCERE BOOK SALES - 
Agents wanted now, part time or 
fuO. do not confuse with usual 
worn-out offer. No experience 
needed. For details said $1 to 
Beech Sales, 4412-B, 
Schoolhouse Path, Portsmouth, 
VA 23703. 
104T3-16 

PROCESS MAIL ATHOME - 
$30.00 per hundred! No ex- 
perience. Part or full time. Start 
immediately, Details, send self- 
addressed, stamped envelope. 
Haiku Distributors, 1 15 
Waipalani Rd., Haiku, HI 
96708. 

10-TFN 



ILPaaManaWariad 



G 



GENERAL HOUSEcleaniag 

rdiabic and experienced. Ca? 
340-1389. 

IITPN 



TOtUY 

SCIAP 



jMlUDMfar 



41S-1fS0 



GOLI»N RnUOVEl" For 

Stud. AKC ragisttred, dark 
golden, 2Vi year old. rtwimiina 
btoodUne. Ckoice irf fee or pick 
of Utter. Cafl dicr 3. HM^SS- 
2051. 

lan* 

STOP LIVING IN FBAK- 

Complete Dog Training 3 oioii- 
thsTO 3 yean. Licensed from 
largest K-9 Corp. in the nation.. 
Can 481-6999. . 

NANDAY'ObNOUR"- Part 

hand tamed, youag Uid. Can bei 

Uught to lalii cage iadudedj 

Moving must sell. $73. Call all«r 

6,497-6296. 

_I3TPN 

UAMESE IITTIIW ■ R^^ 

Poiat. laglstsrctf: ehampimd 
dnd. show ip«ity, SW. 4SI- 
333t 
13TEtl 

OLD ■NGLiU iOElEroOG - 

Puppies, AEC registered, 
wtaaed la Marck. deposit will 
hold.CUI4«7-«li9. 
l34t3-2 

gUMAN 4HIPARD Pup- 
- AKC regislarad, for pel 
jot show. $130 uf%i. 
COUNTRY SQUIRE 
SHETARDS. (M4M40I3. 

IJ-TFN 



3 Plies MMJD TSAKWOOD 

^Stereo CkMacl - 83" haw, kMs or 
storaae voce for uptt and 
records. Han Sony red-toH«d 
tape dack aad Soajr teodver 

Saand speakan. SP20Q0. Space 
in cabinet for tumtaUe. Afl for 
$aOO.CaD3M-3«ll. 

I7TFN 



2S.6aadTMi«iT8E8t 



EARL SMITH OYSTERS • 

Across . from Kurd Seafood 
Restaurant. Shucked in own 
natural judes. By quarts, pints, 
or bushels. Call 340-5171. 

25-TFN 



1*. Aiitifaat 



2a. [RlailaNMiaiil 



ANTIQUE KITCHEN 

Wood/coal stove. Good con- 
dition. Call days at 547-4571 af- 
ter (call 485-4684. 
18TFN 

MVMMEL • Great collectors 

item. $50. CaU 347-2916. 

18 IT 2-23 

IVORY COLLECTION '• 

Statues, Netsike, Oriental 
screens, silks. Cloisonne neck- 
laces; Vases and Boxes. 1804 
Oranby St., 625-9119. Daily 10- 
3. 

18TFN 



lOR SALE-70 Ballroom dance 
lessons. Call Larry Dunn for 
more information 480-21 54. 

26-TFN 



2f . Lawa A Gardaa 



19.Blc)wlat 



CnLS BDffiS • 20 inch, $15. 10 
speed S35, 5 speed $25. CaU 420- 
7719. 

19 V4TFN 



M. MRiinliaitiWRWiti 



IS. 



SALES 

Interested Im 

Making mg 

^BUCKS'' ' 
CaU Immtdiatefy 

463-3540 



DISHWAffllER • Needs 

S25. CaU 420-7719. 

I3TPN 

BABY° 
BAZAAR 

• Now Furniluro and 
Accoasorlas 

• Handmade Baby G rtis 

• Special OrdOfS 

• Nursery Planning Itps 
LAVAWAV PLAN 

Iwilti no service chsrg«) 
Parkawy Sho^ Ctr. 

isas LymhaMn Vtary -CtmiHun 

■MSTtR GAM) - VISA 
Mw-fn in Si 1 l-S 



oacAN 

fpod 



Swinger 600, 
$373. Cdl 421- 

204T^23 



LANDSCAPING SERVICE • 

Lawn and Garden restoration, 
grading and seeding. Free 
estimates. 421-7350. 
28TFN 

Commcfdal - ResMcnllal 
Landscaping Services 
TORO Sprinkler Systems In-, 
stalled. North Landing Nursery 
(Next to Farmers Market), 
Virginia Beach. 427-6886 
29TFN 

JOYNER PROFESSIONAL 
LANDSCAPING and lawn ser- 
vice. Free estimates. 543-4949. 

29Tf I 



MULCH-BUTLER AND SOh« 

Shredded wood and bark hard- 
wood, truckload, any size. 
Protect your shrubs. Get now 
while on sale. We deliver in one 
day. 853-0250 or 855-7467. 

29TFN 



INCOME TAX -aa 

ing (taichiding tax audits). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Afcnt, 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd., (near 
Rosemont Rd.) CaU 463-6608. 
3»TFN 

BOOKKEEPING - Monthly 
bafauice-sheet, PAL detaUed 
trial balance from your checks 
and receipts, stubs, or registn 
Upes. 941's and VA-5's. Up to 
200 checkbook transactions 
monthly: $45. Payables, receW- 
able, small payroU. Chesapeake 
only. Call 420-6623. 
, 39-TFN 

■ * « — ■ — - ■ — — 

BOOKKEEPING SEk«>v.a. - 

Including quarterly payroll, 
reports and bank account recop* 
dilation. Specializing in taaJt 
proprietorships. Pick up and 
delivery. Retired professional. 
Call 420-5624. 

39TFN 



wMm saianaHiaaw^w 



31. 



D- AM/FM.8 

I liMa. SSO. Cal 420- 

2I4TTFN 



OFfKE CHAIRS - 3 deluxe. 1 
swivel desk and 2 side chairs. 
CaU 547-2916. 

3IIT2-23 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Proposed Highway Project 

Route 190 (Kempsville Road) 

City of Virginia Beach 

All interested pawns are a<Msed tiutt die ap- 
proval of the locaticm and iniiJOT (tensn fe^ures 
for Route 190 (KempsviUe Road) Project 0190 - 
134 - 103, C-SOl, from 0.13 mile scnith of Iiulian 
River Road to 0.20 mik umth of C^tfcrville Tur- 
n{rike. in the City of Virginia Beadi^ is now final 
with the Federal Highway Afiininittntion's ap- 
proval of the environn^ntal cfixiunait pr^Muad 
for this project. 

Maps, drawings, a final environmental 
doctimrat and otim inf(Mtnad<M an v^uteMe m 
the Dei»rtment's Durtrict Of^e tt &fMk, and 
in its Reidency Office located at the iMenec&» 
of Business Route 13 (Military Hi^lni^ mi 
Route 168 in Ctesapeake. f« viewl^ if |B> 
t«e$t^ persons. 

State H^kway Tru^ortitfM 
CMwnl^a of Vbgfaita 



.IMIAIE — 



nilMMK • aKTMUl 

Pod Soviee aaJSipplies 

34M9I1 



32.lniRauFariaRt 



STORfS AND STORAGE areas 
- AU sixes. Propoiies unlimited. 
Marvin Goidfarb. 399-8390, 484- 
1275. 

32TFN 



When Something Needs 
Building or Repaired, You Need 

BLACK 
BROS. 

Home Improvement 
Spccialisls 
'Building C'onlraclor»Roofs»Carp«^»ris»tiarages 
•Bath Remodeled* Room Additions 
•Aluminum Sidings^Kiichen Remodeling 

545-7318 

Haxlii:.lllacfc.Hr. 





Dean P. Edwards, Inc. 

AdditicHU, Rei»irs, Concrete Work 

and New Home Construction 

Guarantee Satisfaction & 

Quality Workmanship 

a»«apeakc: Outer Banks 

804-421-9273 919-261-2901 



ADDITIONS • Rooms, garages, 
convert garages, decks, etc. 
QuaUty work by a licensed 
bidder. Free estimates. Call 340- 
2Slk 

' 47TFN 

AMWIMMS, ROOMS- car- 
f, nraflag, s^lng. storm 
*, storai doon, plastering, 
Jartrlc. ooacrete work, plum- 
felag. fDtteiiiig. remodeling, kit' 
chai aad baths, brick and block 
work, aluminum siding, 
fireplaces, carpeting painting, 
spariaHting in parking areas and 
driveways, all type of 
(lemolitioa, free estimau without 
obligation, prompt service. Ser- 
ving all of Tidewater. Bonded 
and Insured, State Registered. 
Call 625-7435, 623-«l48, m 499- 
5516. 

47-TFN 



^Va RvvMf vl N8MM| 



ANinSSON REMODELING - 

AU types of home repain. Pain- 
ting, rooflng, dding, carpoitry, 
etc. Work guaranteed. Free 
csthaates. Insured and bonded. 
Call 588-2558. 

49TFN 



51. 



40.Servicaa 



ROOKKEEPEat - Will do books 
in my home. Experienced in 
payroll and quarterly returns. 
Pick-up and delivery service. 
CaU 545-4096 aft« 5 p.m. for 
tame inf«mnation and rates. 
,.^, 40V«TFN 

TYPING SERVICE - For 

businesses and individuals. 7 
days a week, IBM Selectric. 
Reasonable rates. Call either 
467-7112, Kempsville area, or 
463-0236, Hilltop/Pembroke 
area. 
40TFN 

WALLPAPODNG • Experiea- 
ced, references, all work faaras- 
teed, $7 a loU. CaB St7-19MMk 
forDebra. 

404TM3 



TAXRETURI^ 

Dave Huff 

AccoyMaw 

Caa48l-26r 

BooUeepng aad Tu I 

40-4T : LO* 

INCOME TAX SatVKX - 

Over 25 yean co^biaei s- 
peneoce, low tax fees, flaae day 
service. Cd CoaaMSNeaM for 
ft«eeraaMie.4ai-«S0a. 

40Tr** 



WALLPAPiaiNQ AND 
PAINTINC-Fast snd friendly 
s»vicc, local references fur- 
nished. Call tts for a free 
climate. Arthur and Company 
Redecorating Conuvctors. 420- 
3478. 
■ _ 4iJB» 



PAINTING - Large or smah 
Jobs. Interior and exterior. Free 
Mtimates. Very reasonable 
prices. References available upon 
request. Commercial work alsfr 
done, and light carpentry and 
wallpapering experience. Call 
397-5483 or 484-1425. 

5ITFN 



aZ. rMtafnplqf 



J 



THE LEIGH PHOTOGRA- 
PHIC SERVICE - Offm full 
of your needs at your 
Isase call for more in- 
fotmsoiaa and oaea dtfes. 482- 
1312. 

5^TFN 



kATflBOOMI 

OM ani new. Sjiarahnng in 
tfle wtSt and floor 
Rsasoiabii rales. Free 
20 years cspciieuoe in 
Saitf and laifc 
d work. Call 
W.<774«9IMe. 

SSffN 




iSEWINdMAOUNES- 

1 with ctfMnrt, S75. 1 withow 
[$25.001420-7719. 

5«rFN 





PIANO 
TUNING 



kltiOOW boutique 

MEW % «$CT OMt% n'* Ww 
ftMktaaieM 
t'SKD Furniture. Aceeanariw A T«» 
Bu yin«/SH«na/C«i*r»^* faratoe* 



U\h l.irMifca*f« P*«» .497.21 S4| 




^^"^ 



^m^ 



m^mmmmmmmiiflfgggfmmmmmmmmmmmm 



■WB 



1 8 Virginia Beach Sun, February 23, 1983 




. At Kline Chevrolet 



U.S. Conversions - Anyway You Want It! 



They're on our lot and 
ready to go. Just as long 
as you don't, ask for pep- 
peroni or extra cheese. 

U. S. Conversions, Inc. 
has compiled several poin- 
ts of interest in which to 
aim your confidence in 
today's van conversion 
market-place. We believe 
in our product and hope 
we can aid you in your 
purchasing decision. 

U. S. Conversions, Inc. 
takes pride in meeting the 



best interest of your 
safety, we comply with all 
federal codes and' 
regulations. 

We believe in our 
products and will be 
around in the future to 
stand behind their quality 
and performance should 
any warranty short- 
comings or servioi needs 
arise. Quality is a word 
frequently tossed about in 
the automotive industry. 
But, at U. S. -Conversions, 



Let yow cjrc for 

pncWmi kc jTMr 







U.S. Convcnioii 
wiD be yoar mat 
dntkc la ■ flue 
motor vekklc. 








O.DTbonpson JayTiowbridoe Carlton 

Kline sales professtonals are among the t>est In 
the entire automotive industry. Their product 
knowledge Is unequalled. Their sincere con- 
cern (or Kline customers is uncompromising. 
And their positive attitudes about their 
profession are obvious. 

So, just being a member of the Kline 
sales team Is an achievement in itself 
Buttoexcel and be a Kline Professional 
Sales Leoder is a special honor. 

These Kline Professional Sales Lead- 
ers led their associates to another 



Sorrple Etsfie) Murphy Jim Brlstow 

record breaking sales year tor Kline Chevrolet 
in continuing our pace as one of ttie fastest 
growing new car dealerships in America And 
each of the five has received the national 
recognition of Chevrolet National 
Legion of Leaders and Truck Sales 
Honor Club, in addition to being 
a Kline Professional Sales Leader 

When you have a first class sales 
aganization, you'regoing to be proud. 
But if s especially pleasing to recog- 
nize the top of tf\e class. 




l l illM n icl l ona C uKPWlW 

i>>MiTSiso>*o>Miai>vCni> 
Courtwy-Fo»n«» itw 1926 



It's as easy as ordering a 
pizza out. Because at 
Kline Chevrolet, we keep a 
stock of custom-made, U. 
S. Conversion vans right 
on our lot. With designer 
paint schemes, creative 
floor plans and standard 
features that cost extra on 
most vans. Without 
having to wait weeks for 
delivery. 

U. S. Conversions is a 
national leader in building 
custom-made vans. 
They've been designing 



unique vans for serious 
van people for years. And 
Kline Chevrolet is the only 
dealer in Tidewater that 
keeps a full line on hand. 

Stop by and check out a 
fully equipped Chevy van 
that includes a custom 
paint design, AM/FM 
stereo cassette and rich 
pile carpeting, and 
decorator specialties like a 
rear bar with ice chest, 
reclining high back cap- 
tain's chairs and ven- 
tilajed bay windows. 



consumers' needs and 
desires, as our competent 
research and development 
staff has combined the 
comfort and convenience 
of a motorvan with superb 
quality. With the purchase 
of a U. S. Conversions 
Motorvan, you are in- 
sured the best possible 
produce in today's luxury 
van conversion market- 
place, for we take pride in 
the 16 step golden4ouch 
quality inspection we con- 
duct. Additionally, in the 



quality is a way of life. 
Since 1976 each and every 
U. S. Conversion has been 
designed as an upcom- 
promising example of 
American craftmanship. 




FIRST Time Evert 



SELL YOUR CAR FOR CASH 



I Now's The Chance To Sell Your Car At Virginia's Largest | 
i Public Auto Auction. Guaranteed Cash Offer. No Hassles. I 

No Waits. 
For Information & Details^Contact: 



Buchanan Auto Auction 

3201 S. Military Hwy. Chesapeake 



485-3342 




TOIMII Vt MIML Pm 
mtTAM 



424-1811 



6.SLITraMIML. 



KLINE CHEVROLET 

1495 S. MUitary Highway 
3 Miles Soutli Of MiU tory Circle 



■p^ 



#1- SUFFOLK 

Mike Duman Ford-Mercury 

THE "DO MAN" W. SAVE YOU MORE! 

NO CASH OR TRADE NEEDED WITH APPROVED CREDIT 
NEW-USED-PARTS-SERVICE-RENTALS-LEASING 
1600 N. MAIN ST., SUFFOLK 539-1595 (Suffolk) 627-8944 (Norfolk) 
ONLY 15 MINUTES FROM CHESAPEAKE 




I'OiirucB (14) 

Crartcou 

SalcMMa 

To Serve 

Ym 

• 

nmueeABd 

MuOb 
Praaiia 

• . 

UMACaiHk 



MIC la 



11.9 



% 

AM 




ON ML 19Sa 
a IMS OlOS A 
OMC TRUCKS 



OVER IM NEW 

CAIS IN STOCK 

ANDONOU>E> 

AH 

E^HipaeBl 
Factory 
iHtallcd 



l«W »-lf MOHIV 




VANS BY 
STARCRAFTd 




r*CTO«T 



£xcliidiiig 19S3 
Hant/OMs 




)M L MUTur nrr. 
nauwMn. r«. 

424-6380 



#143 



THRU MONDAY ONLY ! 

New 1983 Renault 
LeCAR 





Ciril Mn, •SJHSM, talwn to IhMn. 
HjmtM, llMMt ckvp. •741.M, 41 ■•■■ 
Mt m »» «li API I.M%, TMil Qf 



New 1983 Plymoutli 
COLT 



CMk Prin, 4 jH.M, MaMt u I 
•4JM.M. fluKc ck»(c, Snt.a. 41 awi- 
Mt piyaieili APR I.5**, TMat H 
paranli, •S.'nS.M. 



New 1983 Renault 
ALLIANCE. 



Perry Buick 

Presents The 

Front Wheel Drive 

Performers 



126 



94 



CT^... 




11.9<7o 

Financing 



auk rrk», t.USM. Mnct to Itauc^ 
•S,1M.M. flaHK* tkH|t, •Hl.U. 41 
IWt »«;awali, AM t-JM, TMiU .1 

. %jm.n. 




Cmh Prtct. n.m.m. mmh m i 

•MM.W, nana cfcatft. 'I.M4.a4, 41 
■■■I M > fttmiMt Am I.S*^, T«M •( 

n.iMM. 



' A«pa|>amuwMk*9«S«ima,cHkaclra4«hi. 41 



New 1983 
Plymouth 
K-CAR 
63 



148 



Mo. 




CMRVSUtt O PIVMOUTM O ■■■Mt IflNWOKO 

14l4S.MUIMnrHGWY. 424^4600 

3 MUS SOUTH or MUUeV QKIf 



Century 

39.24 
Hwy. Mpg 



46-28 
Hwy. Mpg. 



Buick's Designs 
For Driving 

PERRY BUICK* 

MIS vmcmiA WEAcm m,vd. 

IN NOWOLK AT NEWTOWN ROAD 
SERVING TlDtWATER OVER » YEARS 

461-8855 




On All New 

Ponliacs and 

Volvos 

Parkway 



42(1-5450 



^fc